Quotes about weakness

A collection of quotes on the topic of weakness, can, strong, doing.

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Sheikh Mujibur Rahman photo

„My greatest strength is the love for my people, my greatest weakness is that I love them too much.“

—  Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Bengali revolutionary, founder ("father") of Bangladesh 1920 - 1975

Interview with Sir David Frost on the BBC, 1972.
Quote, Other

Citát „People cry, not because they are weak. It is because they've been strong for too long.“
Johnny Depp photo
Osama bin Laden photo

„When people see a strong horse and a weak horse, by nature they will like the strong horse.“

—  Osama bin Laden founder of al-Qaeda 1957 - 2011

Video interview, quoted in Analyzing Leaders, Presidents and Terrorists by Diane E. Holloway page 325 https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Jc7CY1yV1g8C&pg=PA325, with NPR transcript https://www.npr.org/news/specials/response/investigation/011213.binladen.transcript.html (9 November 2001)
2000s, 2002

Swami Vivekananda photo
Swami Vivekananda photo
Martin Luther King, Jr. photo

„The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. Through violence you may murder the liar, but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth. Through violence you may murder the hater, but you do not murder hate.“

—  Martin Luther King, Jr. American clergyman, activist, and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement 1929 - 1968

'Where Do We Go From Here?" as published in Where Do We Go from Here : Chaos or Community? (1967), p. 62; many statements in this book, or slight variants of them, were also part of his address Where Do We Go From Here?" which has a section below. A common variant appearing at least as early as 1968 has "Returning violence for violence multiplies violence..." An early version of the speech as published in A Martin Luther King Treasury (1964), p. 173, has : "Returning hate for hate multiplies hate..."
1960s
Context: The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. Through violence you may murder the liar, but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth. Through violence you may murder the hater, but you do not murder hate. In fact, violence merely increases hate. So it goes. … Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.

Tigran Petrosian photo

„I have a weakness for any piece in excess of my opponent's numbers - from pawn to queen.“

—  Tigran Petrosian Soviet Georgian Armenian chess player and chess writer 1929 - 1984

Quoted in Vik L Vasilev, "Tigran Petrosian His Life and Games" (Batsford, London, 1974) p. 166.

Romain Rolland photo

„We're too weak to sacrifice the things we love.“

— Raised by Wolves

Raised by Wolves, season 1, episode 4. Character Ambrose.

K. B. Hedgewar photo

„Peace and love are possible only between equals. The real enemies of peace are those weak people, who, because of their weakness, incite the strong. If we are weak, we commit the sin of disturbing world peace. The real cause of our degradation is our mental weakness.“

—  K. B. Hedgewar Founding leader of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh 1889 - 1940

Dr. K.B. Hedgewar, Quoted from Talreja, K. M. (2000). Holy Vedas and holy Bible: A comparative study. New Delhi: Rashtriya Chetana Sangathan.

Washington Irving photo
Jordan Peterson photo
Elizabeth I of England photo

„I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too,“

—  Elizabeth I of England Queen regnant of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until 1603 1533 - 1603

Speech to the Troops at Tilbury (1588)
Context: I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm.

Primo Levi photo
Swami Vivekananda photo
Kanō Jigorō photo
Adolf Hitler photo

„Life does not forgive weakness.“

—  Adolf Hitler, book Hitler's Letters and Notes

17 February 1945.
Disputed, The Testament of Adolf Hitler (1945)
Variant: Life does not forgive weakness.
Source: Hitler's Letters and Notes

John Locke photo
John Locke photo
Ignatius of Loyola photo

„Good times create weak people's and weak people creates bad time and bad times creates strong peoples and strong 💪peoples create good times“

—  Attiah

So don't worry if now your time is bad it's making you strong so nothing can effect you in future

Sitting Bull photo
Anne Frank photo

„The weak fall, but the strong will remain and never go under!“

—  Anne Frank victim of the Holocaust and author of a diary 1929 - 1945

Variant: The weak die out and the strong will survive, and will live on forever
Source: The Diary of a Young Girl

John Locke photo
Sitting Bull photo

„I will remain what I am until I die, a hunter, and when there are no buffalo or other game I will send my children to hunt and live on prairie, for where an Indian is shut up in one place his body becomes weak.“

—  Sitting Bull Hunkpapa Lakota medicine man and holy man 1831 - 1890

Recorded by James M. Walsh, inspector in the Northwest Territory of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, at a conference with Sitting Bull on March 23, 1879. Published in Utley, Robert M. The Lance and the Shield. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1993. p. 206.

Henry David Thoreau photo
John Stuart Mill photo
Napoleon Hill photo

„The starting point of all achievement is DESIRE. Keep this constantly in mind. Weak desire brings weak results, just as a small fire makes a small amount of heat.“

—  Napoleon Hill American author 1883 - 1970

Source: Think and Grow Rich: The Landmark Bestseller - Now Revised and Updated for the 21st Century

Marlene Dietrich photo
Stephen Colbert photo

„And then I'm weak. As much as I want to make the audience laugh, I really want to make Jon laugh.“

—  Stephen Colbert American political satirist, writer, comedian, television host, and actor 1964

Entertainment Weekly interview http://www.jerriblank.com/colbert_ew.html, August 13, 2004, on his character break during the infamous Prince Charles sketch on The Daily Show.
Context: Such a proud moment of professionalism. You work for years crafting cogent satirical essays and the thing that everybody remembers is me making love to a Chiquita and bursting into laughter. What you can't see off camera is Jon started laughing first. And then I'm weak. As much as I want to make the audience laugh, I really want to make Jon laugh.

Max Scheler photo

„There are two fundamentally different ways for the strong to bend down to the weak, for the rich to help the poor, for the more perfect life to help the “less perfect.” This action can be motivated by a powerful feeling of security, strength, and inner salvation, of the invincible fullness of one’s own life and existence. All this unites into the clear awareness that one is rich enough to share one’s being and possessions. Love, sacrifice, help, the descent to the small and the weak, here spring from a spontaneous overflow of force, accompanied by bliss and deep inner calm. Compared to this natural readiness for love and sacrifice, all specific “egoism,” the concern for oneself and one’s interest, and even the instinct of “self-preservation” are signs of a blocked and weakened life. Life is essentially expansion, development, growth in plenitude, and not “self-preservation,” as a false doctrine has it. Development, expansion, and growth are not epiphenomena of mere preservative forces and cannot be reduced to the preservation of the “better adapted.” … There is a form of sacrifice which is a free renunciation of one’s own vital abundance, a beautiful and natural overflow of one’s forces. Every living being has a natural instinct of sympathy for other living beings, which increases with their proximity and similarity to himself. Thus we sacrifice ourselves for beings with whom we feel united and solidary, in contrast to everything “dead.” This sacrificial impulse is by no means a later acquisition of life, derived from originally egoistic urges. It is an original component of life and precedes all those particular “aims” and “goals” which calculation, intelligence, and reflection impose upon it later. We have an urge to sacrifice before we ever know why, for what, and for whom! Jesus’ view of nature and life, which sometimes shines through his speeches and parables in fragments and hidden allusions, shows quite clearly that he understood this fact. When he tells us not to worry about eating and drinking, it is not because he is indifferent to life and its preservation, but because he sees also a vital weakness in all “worrying” about the next day, in all concentration on one’s own physical well-being. … all voluntary concentration on one’s own bodily wellbeing, all worry and anxiety, hampers rather than furthers the creative force which instinctively and beneficently governs all life. … This kind of indifference to the external means of life (food, clothing, etc.) is not a sign of indifference to life and its value, but rather of a profound and secret confidence in life’s own vigor and of an inner security from the mechanical accidents which may befall it. A gay, light, bold, knightly indifference to external circumstances, drawn from the depth of life itself—that is the feeling which inspires these words! Egoism and fear of death are signs of a declining, sick, and broken life. …
This attitude is completely different from that of recent modern realism in art and literature, the exposure of social misery, the description of little people, the wallowing in the morbid—a typical ressentiment phenomenon. Those people saw something bug-like in everything that lives, whereas Francis sees the holiness of “life” even in a bug.“

—  Max Scheler German philosopher 1874 - 1928

Source: Das Ressentiment im Aufbau der Moralen (1912), L. Coser, trans. (1961), pp. 88-92

Max Scheler photo

„One cannot love anybody without turning away from oneself. However, the crucial question is whether this movement is prompted by the desire to turn toward a positive value, or whether the intention is a radical escape from oneself. “Love” of the second variety is inspired by self-hatred, by hatred of one’s own weakness and misery. The mind is always on the point of departing for distant places. Afraid of seeing itself and its inferiority, it is driven to give itself to the other—not because of his worth, but merely for the sake of his “otherness.” Modern philosophical jargon has found a revealing term for this phenomenon, one of the many modern substitutes for love: “altruism.” This love is not directed at a previously discovered positive value, nor does any such value flash up in the act of loving: there is nothing but the urge to turn away from oneself and to lose oneself in other people’s business. We all know a certain type of man frequently found among socialists, suffragettes, and all people with an ever-ready “social conscience”— the kind of person whose social activity is quite clearly prompted by inability to keep his attention focused on himself, on his own tasks and problems. Looking away from oneself is here mistaken for love! Isn’t it abundantly clear that “altruism,” the interest in “others” and their lives, has nothing at all to do with love? The malicious or envious person also forgets his own interest, even his “preservation.” He only thinks about the other man’s feelings, about the harm and the suffering he inflicts on him. Conversely, there is a form of genuine “self-love” which has nothing at all to do with “egoism.” It is precisely the essential feature of egoism that it does not apprehend the full value of the isolated self. The egoist sees himself only with regard to the others, as a member of society who wishes to possess and acquire more than the others. Selfdirectedness or other-directedness have no essential bearing on the specific quality of love or hatred. These acts are different in themselves, quite independently of their direction.“

—  Max Scheler German philosopher 1874 - 1928

Das Ressentiment im Aufbau der Moralen (1912)

Max Scheler photo
Nikos Kazantzakis photo

„Fear, selfishness, greed and a human weakness for seeking the "easy way" have led us to the abyss.“

—  David Lane (white nationalist) American white supremacist, convicted felon 1938 - 2007

Now or Never
Focus Fourteen

Scipio Africanus photo

„I am mindful of human weakness, and I reflect upon the might of Fortune and know that everything that we do is exposed to a thousand chances.“

—  Scipio Africanus Roman general in the Second Punic War -235 - -183 BC

Context: I am mindful of human weakness, and I reflect upon the might of Fortune and know that everything that we do is exposed to a thousand chances. But, just as I should admit that I were acting with arrogance and violence if, before I had crossed over to Africa, I were to reject you when you were voluntarily withdrawing from Italy and, while your army was already on shipboard, you were coming in person to sue for peace, so now, when I have dragged you to Africa, resisting and shifting ground as we almost came to blows, I am under no obligation to respect you. Therefore, if to the terms upon which peace was formerly about to be made, as it seemed, you are adding some kind of compensation for the ships loaded with supplies that were taken by force during the armistice, and for violence done to my envoys, I have reason to bring it before the council. But if that addition also seems too severe, prepare for war, since you have been unable to endure a peace [bellum parate, quoniam pacem pati non potuistis].

Reply to Hannibal's attempt to set terms for peace, prior to the Battle of Zama, as quoted in Livy. Books XXVIII-XXX With An English Translation (1949), Book 30, Ch. 31 http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0159%3Abook%3D30%3Achapter%3D31
Variant translation:
I am aware of the frailty of man, I think about the power of fortune, and I know that all our actions are at the mercy of a thousand vicissitudes. Now I admit that it would have been arrogant and headstrong reaction on my part if you had come to sue for peace before I crossed to Africa, and I had rejected your petition when you were yourself voluntarily quitting Italy, and had your troops embarked on your ships. But, as it is, I have forced you back to Africa, and you are reluctant and resisting almost to the point of fighting, so that I feel no need to show you any consideration. Accordingly, if something is actually added to the terms on which it seems probable that a peace could be concluded — some sort of indemnity for the forceful appropriation of our ships, along with their cargoes, during truce and for the violation of our envoys — then I have something to take to my council. But if you consider even that to be excessive, prepare for war, for you have found peace intolerable.
Hannibal's War : Books Twenty-one to Thirty by Livy, as translated by John Yardley (2006), p. 600
Prepare to fight — for, evidently, you have found peace intolerable.
Let us make war, since evidently, you have found peace intolerable.

Michael Jordan photo
Brother Yun photo

„It is not great men who change the world, but weak men in the hands of a great God.“

—  Brother Yun Chinese christian house church leader 1958

Source: The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun

Theodore Roosevelt photo
Billie Eilish photo

„I hate smiling. It makes me feel weak and powerless and small. I've always been like that; I don't smile in any pictures.“

—  Billie Eilish American singer-songwriter 2001

https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/art-books-music/a13040159/billie-eilish-interview/

Robert T. Kiyosaki photo
Audre Lorde photo
Han Yong-un photo
Osamu Dazai photo
Mario Draghi photo
Billie Eilish photo
Koichi Tohei photo
Paul Klee photo
Joseph Conrad photo
Roméo Dallaire photo
Don Henley photo

„I've been tryin' to get down to the Heart of the Matter
Because the flesh will get weak
And the ashes will scatter
So I'm thinkin' about forgiveness
Forgiveness
Even if you don't love me anymore.“

—  Don Henley American singer, lyricist, producer and drummer 1947

"The Heart of the Matter"
Song lyrics, The End of the Innocence (1989)

Alain de Botton photo
Franz Kafka photo
Arthur Miller photo

„My argument with so much of psychoanalysis, is the preconception that suffering is a mistake, or a sign of weakness, or a sign even of illness, when in fact, possibly the greatest truths we know have come out of people's suffering“

—  Arthur Miller playwright from the United States 1915 - 2005

1963 interview, used in The Century of the Self (2002)
Context: My argument with so much of psychoanalysis, is the preconception that suffering is a mistake, or a sign of weakness, or a sign even of illness, when in fact, possibly the greatest truths we know have come out of people's suffering; that the problem is not to undo suffering or to wipe it off the face of the earth but to make it inform our lives, instead of trying to cure ourselves of it constantly and avoid it, and avoid anything but that lobotomized sense of what they call "happiness." There's too much of an attempt, it seems to me, to think in terms of controlling man, rather than freeing him. Of defining him rather than letting him go. It's part of the whole ideology of this age, which is power-mad.

David Foster Wallace photo

„If, by the virtue of charity or the circumstance of desperation, you ever chance to spend a little time around a Substance-recovery halfway facility like Enfield MA’s state-funded Ennet House, you will acquire many exotic new facts…That certain persons simply will not like you no matter what you do. That sleeping can be a form of emotional escape and can with sustained effort be abused. That purposeful sleep-deprivation can also be an abusable escape. That you do not have to like a person in order to learn from him/her/it. That loneliness is not a function of solitude. That logical validity is not a guarantee of truth. That it takes effort to pay attention to any one stimulus for more than a few seconds. That boring activities become, perversely, much less boring if you concentrate intently on them. That if enough people in a silent room are drinking coffee it is possible to make out the sound of steam coming off the coffee. That sometimes human beings have to just sit in one place and, like, hurt. That you will become way less concerned with what other people think of you when you realize how seldom they do. That there is such a thing as raw, unalloyed, agendaless kindness. That it is possible to fall asleep during an anxiety attack. That concentrating intently on anything is very hard work. That 99% of compulsive thinkers’ thinking is about themselves; that 99% of this self-directed thinking consists of imagining and then getting ready for things that are going to happen to them; and then, weirdly, that if they stop to think about it, that 100% of the things they spend 99% of their time and energy imagining and trying to prepare for all the contingencies and consequences of are never good. In short that 99% of the head’s thinking activity consists of trying to scare the everliving shit out of itself. That it is possible to make rather tasty poached eggs in a microwave oven. That some people’s moms never taught them to cover up or turn away when they sneeze. That the people to be the most frightened of are the people who are the most frightened. That it takes great personal courage to let yourself appear weak. That no single, individual moment is in and of itself unendurable. That other people can often see things about you that you yourself cannot see, even if those people are stupid. That having a lot of money does not immunize people from suffering or fear. That trying to dance sober is a whole different kettle of fish. That different people have radically different ideas of basic personal hygiene. That, perversely, it is often more fun to want something than to have it. That if you do something nice for somebody in secret, anonymously, without letting the person you did it for know it was you or anybody else know what it was you did or in any way or form trying to get credit for it, it’s almost its own form of intoxicating buzz. That anonymous generosity, too, can be abused. That it is permissible to want. That everybody is identical in their unspoken belief that way deep down they are different from everyone else. That this isn’t necessarily perverse. That there might not be angels, but there are people who might as well be angels.“

—  David Foster Wallace, book Infinite Jest

Infinite Jest (1996)

Aimé Césaire photo

„Weakness always has a thousand means and cowardice is all that keeps us from listing them.“

—  Aimé Césaire, Une Tempête

Caliban in Une Tempête (1969)
Une Tempête (1969)

Anne Louise Germaine de Staël photo
John Dryden photo
Barbara Ehrenreich photo

„A lot of what we experience as strength comes from knowing what to do with weakness.“

—  Barbara Ehrenreich, book Nickel and Dimed

Source: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America

Cornelius Keagon photo
Cornelius Keagon photo

„Life can be dangerous at any time if you do not know how to protect your weak self.“

—  Kimsa Sok

Kimsa Sok
Source: https://quotepark.com/quotes/2102246-kimsa-sok-life-can-be-dangerous-at-any-time-if-you-do-not-kn/

Daniel O'Connell photo
Joachim von Ribbentrop photo
Vladimir Lenin photo
Pierre Joseph Proudhon photo

„I protest against every order with which some authority may feel pleased on the basis of some alleged necessity to over-rule my free will. Laws: We know what they are, and what they are worth! They are spider webs for the rich and mighty, steel chains for the poor and weak, fishing nets in the hands of government.“

—  Pierre Joseph Proudhon French politician, mutualist philosopher, economist, and socialist 1809 - 1865

"The Authority Principle" in No Gods, No Masters : An Anthology of Anarchism (1980) Daniel Guérin, as translated by Paul Sharkey (1998), p. 90
Context: I stand ready to negotiate, but I want no part of laws: I acknowledge none; I protest against every order with which some authority may feel pleased on the basis of some alleged necessity to over-rule my free will. Laws: We know what they are, and what they are worth! They are spider webs for the rich and mighty, steel chains for the poor and weak, fishing nets in the hands of government.

Warren Farrell photo

„The weakness of men is the facade of strength; the strength of women is the facade of weakness.“

—  Warren Farrell, book The Myth of Male Power

Source: The Myth of Male Power (1993), Part 1: The Myth of Male Power, p. 13.

Brandon Sanderson photo
Arthur Conan Doyle photo
Sri Sri Ravi Shankar photo
Gordon B. Hinckley photo
John Nash photo
Sylvia Plath photo

„Let me not be weak and tell others how bleeding I am internally; how day by day it drips, and gathers, and congeals.“

—  Sylvia Plath American poet, novelist and short story writer 1932 - 1963

Source: The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

Erving Goffman photo
Rich Mullins photo
Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet photo

„The greatest weakness of all weaknesses is to fear too much to appear weak.“

—  Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet French bishop and theologian 1627 - 1704

Politics Drawn from the Very Words of Holy Scripture (1709)

Bing Xin photo

„I am weak and therefore I am strong.“

—  Bing Xin Chinese writer 1900 - 1999

As quoted in Haiping Yan's Chinese Women Writers and the Feminist Imagination, 1905–1948 (New York: Routledge, 2006), p. 8

Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach photo

„The vain and weak see a judge in everyone; the proud and strong know no judge other than themselves.“

—  Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Austrian writer 1830 - 1916

Der eitle, schwache Mensch sieht in Jedem einen Richter, der stolze, starke hat keinen Richter als sich selbst.
Source: Aphorisms (1880/1893), p. 34.

„Man is weak and when he makes strength his profession he is even weaker.“

—  Antonio Porchia Italian Argentinian poet 1885 - 1968

El hombre es débil y cuando ejerce la profesíon de fuerte es más débil.
Voces (1943)

Edgar Allan Poe photo

„Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,“

—  Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven

Stanza 1.
The Raven (1844)
Context: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.

Francis of Assisi photo

„And St. Francis said: 'My dear son, be patient, because the weaknesses of the body are given to us in this world by God for the salvation of the soul. So they are of great merit when they are borne patiently.“

—  Francis of Assisi Catholic saint and founder of the Franciscan Order 1182 - 1226

Source: The Little Flowers of St. Francis of Assisi

Anne Frank photo
B.F. Skinner photo
Billy Graham photo
Cassandra Clare photo
Albert Lutuli photo

„I do not hate the white man; you see, his position of domination has placed him in a position of moral weakness.“

—  Albert Lutuli South African politician 1898 - 1967

As quoted in Guy Arnold (1976), The last bunker: a report on white South Africa today, p. 192.

Adam Weishaupt photo
William Wilberforce photo

„If then we would indeed be “filled with wisdom and spiritual understanding;” if we would “walk worthy of the Lord unto all well pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God;” here let us fix our eyes! “Laying aside every weight, and the sin that does so easily beset us; let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus, the Author and Finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.
Here best we may learn the infinite importance of Christianity. How little it can deserve to be treated in that slight and superficial way, in which it is in these days regarded by the bulk of nominal Christians, who are apt to think it may be enough, and almost equally pleasing to God, to be religious in any way, and upon any system. What exquisite folly it must be to risk the soul on such a venture, in direct contradiction to the dictates of reason, and the express declaration of the word of God! “How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation?”
LOOKING UNTO JESUS!
Here we shall best learn the duty and reasonableness of an absolute and unconditional surrender of soul and body to the will and service of God.—“We are not our own; for we are bought with a price,” and must “therefore” make it our grand concern to “glorify God with our bodies and our spirits, which are God’s.” Should we be base enough, even if we could do it with safety, to make any reserves in our returns of service to that gracious Saviour, who “gave up himself for us?” If we have formerly talked of compounding by the performance of some commands for the breach of others; can we now bear the mention of a composition of duties, or of retaining to ourselves the right of practising little sins! The very suggestion of such an idea fills us with indignation and shame, if our hearts be not dead to every sense of gratitude.
LOOKING UNTO JESUS!
Here we find displayed, in the most lively colours, the guilt of sin, and how hateful it must be to the perfect holiness of that Being, “who is of purer eyes than to behold iniquity.” When we see that, rather than sin should go unpunished, “God spared not his own Son,” but “was pleased[99], to bruise him and put him to grief” for our sakes; how vainly must impenitent sinners flatter themselves with the hope of escaping the vengeance of Heaven, and buoy themselves up with I know not what desperate dreams of the Divine benignity!
Here too we may anticipate the dreadful sufferings of that state, “where shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth;” when rather than that we should undergo them, “the Son of God” himself, who “thought it no robbery to be equal with God,” consented to take upon him our degraded nature with all its weaknesses and infirmities; to be “a man of sorrows,” “to hide not his face from shame and spitting,” “to be wounded for our transgressions, and bruised for our iniquities,” and at length to endure the sharpness of death, “even the death of the Cross,” that he might “deliver us from the wrath to come,” and open the kingdom of Heaven to all believers.
LOOKING UNTO JESUS!
Here best we may learn to grow in the love of God! The certainty of his pity and love towards repenting sinners, thus irrefragably demonstrated, chases away the sense of tormenting fear, and best lays the ground in us of a reciprocal affection. And while we steadily contemplate this wonderful transaction, and consider in its several relations the amazing truth, that “God spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all;” if our minds be not utterly dead to every impulse of sensibility, the emotions of admiration, of preference, of hope, and trust, and joy, cannot but spring up within us, chastened with reverential fear, and softened and quickened by overflowing gratitude. Here we shall become animated by an abiding disposition to endeavour to please our great Benefactor; and by a humble persuasion, that the weakest endeavours of this nature will not be despised by a Being, who has already proved himself so kindly affected towards us. Here we cannot fail to imbibe an earnest desire of possessing his favour, and a conviction, founded on his own declarations thus unquestionably confirmed, that the desire shall not be disappointed. Whenever we are conscious that we have offended this gracious Being, a single thought of the great work of Redemption will be enough to fill us with compunction. We shall feel a deep concern, grief mingled with indignant shame, for having conducted ourselves so unworthily towards one who to us has been infinite in kindness: we shall not rest till we have reason to hope that he is reconciled to us; and we shall watch over our hearts and conduct in future with a renewed jealousy, [Pg 243] lest we should again offend him. To those who are ever so little acquainted with the nature of the human mind, it were superfluous to remark, that the affections and tempers which have been enumerated, are the infallible marks and the constituent properties of Love. Let him then who would abound and grow in this Christian principle, be much conversant with the great doctrines of the Gospel.
It is obvious, that the attentive and frequent consideration of these great doctrines, must have a still more direct tendency to produce and cherish in our minds the principle of the love of Christ.“

—  William Wilberforce English politician 1759 - 1833

Source: Real Christianity (1797), p. 240-243.

Leonard Ravenhill photo
Jeanette Winterson photo