Latin quotes with translation

Explore well-known and useful Latin quotes, phrases and sayings. In Latin with translation.


 Virgil photo

„Each of us bears his own Hell.“
Quisque suos patimur manis.

—  Virgil Ancient Roman poet -70 - -19 BC
Aeneid (29–19 BC), Book VI, Quisque suos patimur manis. Line 743

 Cyprian photo

„There is no salvation outside the Church.“
Salus extra ecclesiam non est.

—  Cyprian Bishop of Carthage and Christian writer 200 - 258
Salus extra ecclesiam non est. Letter to Jubaianus (AD 256), Letter 73

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 Quintilian photo

„We give to necessity the praise of virtue.“
Laudem virtutis necessitati damus.

—  Quintilian ancient Roman rhetor 35 - 96
De Institutione Oratoria (c. 95 AD), Laudem virtutis necessitati damus. Book I, Chapter VIII, 14 Compare: "To maken vertue of necessite", Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, "The Knightes Tale", line 3044

Sidonius Apollinaris photo

„Death may overwhelm them, but not fear; unconquerable they stand their ground, and their courage well-nigh outlives their lives.“
Mors obruit illos,<br/>non timor; invicti perstant animoque supersunt<br/>jam prope post animam.

—  Sidonius Apollinaris Gaulish poet, aristocrat and bishop 430 - 486
Carmina, Mors obruit illos, non timor; invicti perstant animoque supersunt jam prope post animam. Carmen 5, line 251; vol. 1 p. 83.

 Tertullian photo

„Man is one name belonging to every nation upon earth. In them all is one soul though many tongues.“
Omnium gentium unus homo, uarium nomen est, una anima, uaria uox, unus spiritus, uarius sonus, propria cuique genti loquella, sed loquellae materia communis.

—  Tertullian Christian theologian 155 - 230
Context: Man is one name belonging to every nation upon earth. In them all is one soul though many tongues. Every country has its own language, yet the subjects of which the untutored soul speaks are the same everywhere. De Testimonio Animae (The Testimony of the Soul), 6.3

Gaio Valerio Catullo photo

„Idleness ere now has ruined both kings and wealthy cities.“
Otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes.

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo Latin poet -84 - -54 BC
Carmina, Otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes. LI, last lines

John Amos Comenius photo

„Aristotle compared the mind of man to a blank tablet on which nothing was written, but on which all things could be engraved. … There is, however, this difference, that on the tablet the writing is limited by space, while in the case of the mind, you may continually go on writing and engraving without finding any boundary, because, as has already been shown, the mind is without limit.“
Aristoteles hominis animum comparavit tabulae rasae, cui nihil inscriptum sit, inscribi tamen omnia possint. … Hoc interest, quod in tabula lineas ducere non licet, nisi quousque margo permittat: in mente usque et usque scribendo, et sculpendo, terminum nusquam invenies quia (ut ante monitum) interminabilis est.

—  John Amos Comenius Czech teacher, educator, philosopher and writer 1592 - 1670
Aristoteles hominis animum comparavit tabulae rasae, cui nihil inscriptum sit, inscribi tamen omnia possint. … Hoc interest, quod in tabula lineas ducere non licet, nisi quousque margo permittat: in mente usque et usque scribendo, et sculpendo, terminum nusquam invenies quia (ut ante monitum) interminabilis est. The Great Didactic (Didactica Magna) (Amsterdam, 1657) [written 1627–38], as translated by M. W. Keatinge (1896). Cf. Aristotle, De anima, III, 4, 430a: "δυνάμει δ' οὕτως ὥσπερ ἐν γραμματείῳ ᾧ μηθὲν ἐνυπάρχει ἐντελεχείᾳ γεγραμμένον· ὅπερ συμβαίνει ἐπὶ τοῦ νοῦ."

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius photo

„In every adversity of fortune, to have been happy is the most unhappy kind of misfortune.“
Nam in omni adversitate fortunae infelicissimum est genus infortunii fuisse felicem.

—  Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius philosopher of the early 6th century 480
The Consolation of Philosophy · De Consolatione Philosophiae, Book II, Nam in omni adversitate fortunae infelicissimum est genus infortunii fuisse felicem. Prose IV, line 2

Pliny the Younger photo

„It is in the body politic, as in the natural, those disorders are most dangerous that flow from the head.“
Utque in corporibus sic in imperio gravissimus est morbus, qui a capite diffunditur.

—  Pliny the Younger Roman writer 61 - 113
Letters, Book IV, Utque in corporibus sic in imperio gravissimus est morbus, qui a capite diffunditur. Letter 22, 7.

 Statius photo

„Hear oh hear, if my prayer be worthy and such as you yourself might whisper to my frenzy. Those I begot (no matter in what bed) did not try to guide me, bereft of sight and sceptre, or sway my grieving with words. Nay behold (ah agony!), in their pride, kings this while by my calamity, they even mock my darkness, impatient of their father's groans. Even to them am I unclean? And does the sire of the gods see it and do naught? Do you at least, my rightful champion, come hither and range all my progeny for punishment. Put on your head this gore-soaked diadem that I tore off with my bloody nails. Spurred by a father's prayers, go against the brothers, go between them, let steel make partnership of blood fly asunder. Queen of Tartarus' pit, grant the wickedness I would fain see.“
Exaudi, si digna precor quaeque ipsa furenti subiceres. orbum visu regnisque carentem non regere aut dictis maerentem flectere adorti, quos genui quocumque toro; quin ecce superbi —pro dolor!—et nostro jamdudum funere reges insultant tenebris gemitusque odere paternos. hisne etiam funestus ego? et videt ista deorum ignavus genitor? tu saltem debita vindex huc ades et totos in poenam ordire nepotes. indue quod madidum tabo diadema cruentis unguibus abripui, votisque instincta paternis i media in fratres, generis consortia ferro dissiliant. da, Tartarei regina barathri, quod cupiam vidisse nefas.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Thebaid, Book I, Exaudi, si digna precor quaeque ipsa furenti subiceres. orbum visu regnisque carentem non regere aut dictis maerentem flectere adorti, quos genui quocumque toro; quin ecce superbi —pro dolor!—et nostro jamdudum funere reges insultant tenebris gemitusque odere paternos. hisne etiam funestus ego? et videt ista deorum ignavus genitor? tu saltem debita vindex huc ades et totos in poenam ordire nepotes. indue quod madidum tabo diadema cruentis unguibus abripui, votisque instincta paternis i media in fratres, generis consortia ferro dissiliant. da, Tartarei regina barathri, quod cupiam vidisse nefas. Line 73

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 Statius photo

„While spear in hand he repels the hounds agape to rend him.“
Tela manu, reicitque canes in vulnus hiantes.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Thebaid, Book IV, Tela manu, reicitque canes in vulnus hiantes. Line 574 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

 Statius photo

„The wood that crowns the peak of Nesis set fast in ocean.“
Silvaque quae fixam pelago Nesida coronat.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Silvae, Book III, Silvaque quae fixam pelago Nesida coronat. i, line 148 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

 Statius photo

„A Nemean steed in terror of the fight bears the hero from the citadel of Pallas, and fills the fields with the huge flying shadow, and the long trail of dust rises upon the plain.“
Illum Palladia sonipes Nemeaeus ab arce devehit arma pavens umbraque inmane volanti implet agros longoque attollit pulvere campum.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Thebaid, Book IV, Illum Palladia sonipes Nemeaeus ab arce devehit arma pavens umbraque inmane volanti implet agros longoque attollit pulvere campum. Line 136 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

 Statius photo

„…glad applause and the heaven-flung shout of the populace.“
Laetifici plausus missusque ad sidera vulgi clamor.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Thebaid, Book XII, Laetifici plausus missusque ad sidera vulgi clamor. Line 521 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

 Statius photo

„The claw tips are tamed with gold.“
Auro mansueverat ungues.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Thebaid, Book VI, Auro mansueverat ungues. Line 724. Thomas Gray's translation: "And calm'd the terrors of his claws in gold".

 Statius photo

„"The thunderbolt, ay, where the thunderbolt?" Apollo laments.“
Fulmen, io ubi fulmen?' ait. gemit auctor Apollo.

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
Thebaid, Book X, Fulmen, io ubi fulmen?' ait. gemit auctor Apollo. Line 889 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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