Quotes about ruling

A collection of quotes on the topic of rule, ruling, people, can.

Total 4035 quotes, filter:

Benjamin Disraeli photo
Friedrich Engels photo
George Orwell photo
George Orwell photo

„If one harbours anywhere in one's mind a nationalistic loyalty or hatred, certain facts, although in a sense known to be true, are inadmissible. Here are just a few examples. I list below five types of nationalist, and against each I append a fact which it is impossible for that type of nationalist to accept, even in his secret thoughts:
: BRITISH TORY. Britain will come out of this war with reduced power and prestige.
: COMMUNIST. If she had not been aided by Britain and America, Russia would have been defeated by Germany.
: IRISH NATIONALIST. Eire can only remain independent because of British protection.
: TROTSKYIST. The Stalin regime is accepted by the Russian masses.
: PACIFIST. Those who "abjure" violence can only do so because others are committing violence on their behalf.
All of these facts are grossly obvious if one's emotions do not happen to be involved: but to the kind of person named in each case they are also intolerable, and so they have to be denied, and false theories constructed upon their denial. I come back to the astonishing failure of military prediction in the present war. It is, I think, true to say that the intelligentsia have been more wrong about the progress of the war than the common people, and that they were more swayed by partisan feelings. The average intellectual of the Left believed, for instance, that the war was lost in 1940, that the Germans were bound to overrun Egypt in 1942, that the Japanese would never be driven out of the lands they had conquered, and that the Anglo-American bombing offensive was making no impression on Germany. He could believe these things because his hatred for the British ruling class forbade him to admit that British plans could succeed. There is no limit to the follies that can be swallowed if one is under the influence of feelings of this kind. I have heard it confidently stated, for instance, that the American troops had been brought to Europe not to fight the Germans but to crush an English revolution. One has to belong to the intelligentsia to believe things like that: no ordinary man could be such a fool.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

Notes on Nationalism (1945)

George Orwell photo

„Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.“

—  George Orwell, book Politics and the English Language

"Politics and the English Language" (1946)
Context: Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print. Never use a long word where a short one will do. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out. Never use the passive voice where you can use the active. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

George Orwell photo
George Orwell photo

„Since 1930 I had seen little evidence that the USSR was progressing towards anything that one could truly call Socialism. On the contrary, I was struck by clear signs of its transformation into a hierarchical society, in which the rulers have no more reason to give up their power than any other ruling class.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

Original preface to Animal Farm; as published in George Orwell: Some Materials for a Bibliography (1953) by Ian R. Willison
Context: I have never visited Russia and my knowledge of it consists only of what can be learned by reading books and newspapers. Even if I had the power, I would not wish to interfere in Soviet domestic affairs: I would not condemn Stalin and his associates merely for their barbaric and undemocratic methods. It is quite possible that, even with the best intentions, they could not have acted otherwise under the conditions prevailing there.
But on the other hand it was of the utmost importance to me that people in western Europe should see the Soviet regime for what it really was. Since 1930 I had seen little evidence that the USSR was progressing towards anything that one could truly call Socialism. On the contrary, I was struck by clear signs of its transformation into a hierarchical society, in which the rulers have no more reason to give up their power than any other ruling class. Moreover, the workers and intelligentsia in a country like England cannot understand that the USSR of today is altogether different from what it was in 1917. It is partly that they do not want to understand (i. e. they want to believe that, somewhere, a really Socialist country does actually exist), and partly that, being accustomed to comparative freedom and moderation in public life, totalitarianism is completely incomprehensible to them.

George Orwell photo

„A society becomes totalitarian when its structure becomes flagrantly artificial: that is, when its ruling class has lost its function but succeeds in clinging to power by force or fraud.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

"The Prevention of Literature" (1946)
Context: Totalitarianism, however, does not so much promise an age of faith as an age of schizophrenia. A society becomes totalitarian when its structure becomes flagrantly artificial: that is, when its ruling class has lost its function but succeeds in clinging to power by force or fraud. Such a society, no matter how long it persists, can never afford to become either tolerant or intellectually stable. It can never permit either the truthful recording of facts or the emotional sincerity that literary creation demands. But to be corrupted by totalitarianism one does not have to live in a totalitarian country. The mere prevalence of certain ideas can spread a kind of poison that makes one subject after another impossible for literary purposes. Wherever there is an enforced orthodoxy — or even two orthodoxies, as often happens — good writing stops. This was well illustrated by the Spanish civil war. To many English intellectuals the war was a deeply moving experience, but not an experience about which they could write sincerely. There were only two things that you were allowed to say, and both of them were palpable lies: as a result, the war produced acres of print but almost nothing worth reading.

George Orwell photo

„The choice before human beings, is not, as a rule, between good and evil but between two evils.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

"No, Not One," The Adelphi (October 1941), p. 7 http://books.google.com/books?id=hdwYAQAAIAAJ&q=%22The+choice+before+human+beings%22&pg=PA7#v=onepage- 8 http://books.google.com/books?id=hdwYAQAAIAAJ&q=%22is+not+as+a+rule+between+good+and+evil+but+between+two+evils%22&pg=PA8#v=onepage
Context: The choice before human beings, is not, as a rule, between good and evil but between two evils. You can let the Nazis rule the world: that is evil; or you can overthrow them by war, which is also evil. There is no other choice before you, and whichever you choose you will not come out with clean hands.

George Orwell photo

„A totalitarian state is in effect a theocracy, and its ruling caste, in order to keep its position, has to be thought of as infallible.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

"The Prevention of Literature" (1946)
Context: A totalitarian state is in effect a theocracy, and its ruling caste, in order to keep its position, has to be thought of as infallible. But since, in practice, no one is infallible, it is frequently necessary to rearrange past events in order to show that this or that mistake was not made, or that this or that imaginary triumph actually happened. Then, again, every major change in policy demands a corresponding change of doctrine and a revaluation of prominent historical figures.

Benjamin Disraeli photo

„He told Lord Esher that, in talking with the Queen, he observed a simple rule: "I never deny; I never contradict; I sometimes forget."“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Cited in William Flavelle Monypenny and George Earle Buckle, The life of Benjamin Disraeli, Rarl of Beaconsfield, Vol. 6 (1920), p. 463, and in Henry W. Lucy, Memories of Eight Parliaments (1908), p. 66.
Sourced but undated

George Orwell photo
Henry Kissinger photo

„If Tehran insists on combining the Persian imperial tradition with contemporary Islamic fervor, then a collision with America — and, indeed, with its negotiating partners of the Six — is unavoidable. Iran simply cannot be permitted to fulfill a dream of imperial rule in a region of such importance to the rest of the world.“

—  Henry Kissinger United States Secretary of State 1923

"The Next Steps With Iran" in The Washington Post (31 July 2006), p. A15 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/30/AR2006073000546.html
2000s

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn photo
Benjamin Disraeli photo

„As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Source: Books, Coningsby (1844), Endymion (1880), Ch. 36.

Thomas Jefferson photo

„The issue today is the same as it has been throughout all history, whether man shall be allowed to govern himself or be ruled by a small elite.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

Not found in Jefferson's writings. http://www.tcfrank.com/essays/Check_It_Yourself
Misattributed

Chetan Bhagat photo

„Rules, after all, are only made so you can work around them“

—  Chetan Bhagat, book 2 States: The Story of My Marriage

Source: 2 States: The Story of My Marriage

Andrei Sakharov photo

„Only universal cooperation under conditions of intellec­tual freedom and the lofty moral ideals of socialism and labor, accompanied by the elimination of dogmatism and pressures of the concealed interests of ruling classes, will preserve civilization.“

—  Andrei Sakharov Soviet nuclear physicist and human rights activist 1921 - 1989

Progress, Coexistence and Intellectual Freedom (1968)
Context: The division of mankind threatens it with destruction. Civilization is imperiled by: a universal thermonuclear war, catastrophic hunger for most of mankind, stupefaction from the narcotic of "mass culture," and bureaucratized dogmatism, a spreading of mass myths that put entire peoples and continents under the power of cruel and treacherous demagogues, and destruction or degeneration from the unforeseeable consequences of swift changes in the conditions of life on our planet.
In the face of these perils, any action increasing the division of mankind, any preaching of the incompatibility of world ideologies and nations is madness and a crime. Only universal cooperation under conditions of intellec­tual freedom and the lofty moral ideals of socialism and labor, accompanied by the elimination of dogmatism and pressures of the concealed interests of ruling classes, will preserve civilization.
The reader will understand that ideological collaboration cannot apply to those fanatical, sectarian, and extremist ideologies that reject all possibility of rapprochement, discussion, and compromise, for example, the ideologies of fascist, racist, militaristic, and Maoist demagogy.

John Stuart Mill photo

„What is called the Law of Nations is not properly law, but a part of ethics: a set of moral rules, accepted as authoritative by civilized states.“

—  John Stuart Mill British philosopher and political economist 1806 - 1873

Inaugural Address Delivered to the University of St. Andrews, Feb. 1st 1867 (1867) p. 36. http://books.google.com/books?id=DFNAAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA36
Context: What is called the Law of Nations is not properly law, but a part of ethics: a set of moral rules, accepted as authoritative by civilized states. It is true that these rules neither are nor ought to be of eternal obligation, but do and must vary more or less from age to age, as the consciences of nations become more enlightened, and the exigences of political society undergo change. But the rules mostly were at their origin, and still are, an application of the maxims of honesty and humanity to the intercourse of states. They were introduced by the moral sentiments of mankind, or by their sense of the general interest, to mitigate the crimes and sufferings of a state of war, and to restrain governments and nations from unjust or dishonest conduct towards one another in time of peace. Since every country stands in numerous and various relations with the other countries of the world, and many, our own among the number, exercise actual authority over some of these, a knowledge of the established rules of international morality is essential to the duty of every nation, and therefore of every person in it who helps to make up the nation, and whose voice and feeling form a part of what is called public opinion. Let not any one pacify his conscience by the delusion that he can do no harm if he takes no part, and forms no opinion. Bad men need nothing more to compass their ends, than that good men should look on and do nothing. He is not a good man who, without a protest, allows wrong to be committed in his name, and with the means which he helps to supply, because he will not trouble himself to use his mind on the subject. It depends on the habit of attending to and looking into public transactions, and on the degree of information and solid judgment respecting them that exists in the community, whether the conduct of the nation as a nation, both within itself and towards others, shall be selfish, corrupt, and tyrannical, or rational and enlightened, just and noble.

Wangari Maathai photo

„The people are starving. They need food; they need medicine; they need education. They do not need a skyscraper to house the ruling party and a 24-hour TV station.“

—  Wangari Maathai Kenyan environmental and political activist 1940 - 2011

On her opposition to the construction of a skyscraper in Nairobi, Kenya, as quoted in the article Wangari Maathai:"You Strike The Woman ..." by Priscilla Sears in the quarterly In Context #28 (Spring 1991)

Geert Wilders photo
Ian Smith photo

„Let me say it again. I don't believe in black majority rule ever in Rhodesia—not in a thousand years. I repeat that I believe in blacks and whites working together. If one day it is white and the next day it is black, I believe we have failed and it will be a disaster for Rhodesia.“

—  Ian Smith Prime Minister of Rhodesia 1919 - 2007

Nigel Rees, "Sayings of the Century", Unwin paperbacks, 1984, p. 247.
Radio broadcast, March 20, 1976.
Peter Godwin, Comment in the Guardian(UK) Newspaper http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2007/nov/25/comment.zimbabwe.

Bernard Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein photo

„Rule 1, on page 1 of the book of war, is: "Do not march on Moscow". Various people have tried it, Napoleon and Hitler, and it is no good. That is the first rule. I do not know whether your Lordships will know Rule 2 of war. It is: "Do not go fighting with your land armies in China."“

—  Bernard Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein British Army officer, Commander of Allied forces at the Battle of El Alamein 1887 - 1976

It is a vast country, with no clearly defined objectives.
In the House of Lords, 30 May 1962 ( Hansard, Col. 227 http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/lords/1962/may/30/the-army-estimates#S5LV0241P0-00791)

Sergei Rachmaninoff photo
Mahathir bin Mohamad photo
Michael Moorcock photo
Marilyn Manson photo
Samuel Smiles photo

„The greatest slave is not he who is ruled by a despot, great though that evil be, but he who is in the thrall of his own moral ignorance, selfishness, and vice.“

—  Samuel Smiles Scottish author 1812 - 1904

Source: Self-Help; with Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1859), Ch. I : Self-Help — National and Individual

René Guénon photo
Kanō Jigorō photo

„Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love truly, Laugh uncontrollably … And never regret anything that made you smile.“

—  Ruslana Koršunova fashion model 1987 - 2008

"Model's Web rants pined for love" in Daily News (New York, 29 June 2009) http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2008/06/28/2008-06-28_models_web_rants_pined_for_love.html

John Locke photo

„The old question will be asked in this matter of prerogative, But who shall be judge when this power is made a right use of? 1 answer: between an executive power in being, with such a prerogative, and a legislative that depends upon his will for their convening, there can be no judge on earth; as there can be none between the legislative and the people, should either the executive, or the legislative, when they have got the power in their hands, design, or go about to enslave or destroy them. The people have no other remedy in this, as in all other cases where they have no judge on earth, but to appeal to heaven: for the rulers, in such attempts, exercising a power the people never put into their hands, (who can never be supposed to consent that any body should rule over them for their harm) do that which they have not a right to do. And where the body of the people, or any single man, is deprived of their right, or is under the exercise of a power without right, and have no appeal on earth, then they have a liberty to appeal to heaven, whenever they judge the cause of sufficient moment. And therefore, though the people cannot be judge, so as to have, by the constitution of that society, any superior power, to determine and give effective sentence in the case; yet they have, by a law antecedent and paramount to all positive laws of men, reserved that ultimate determination to themselves which belongs to all mankind, where there lies no appeal on earth, viz. to judge, whether they have just cause to make their appeal to heaven. And this judgment they cannot part with, it being out of a man's power so to submit himself to another, as to give him a liberty to destroy him; God and nature never allowing a man so to abandon himself, as to neglect his own preservation: and since he cannot take away his own life, neither can he give another power to take it. Nor let any one think, this lays a perpetual foundation for disorder; for this operates not, till the inconveniency is so great, that the majority feel it, and are weary of it, and find a necessity to have it amended. But this the executive power, or wise princes, never need come in the danger of: and it is the thing, of all others, they have most need to avoid, as of all others the most perilous.“

—  John Locke, book Two Treatises of Government

Second Treatise of Government http://www.constitution.org/jl/2ndtr14.htm, Sec. 168
Two Treatises of Government (1689)

John Locke photo
Thomas Sankara photo
John Locke photo
John Locke photo
Andrew Jackson photo

„No one need think that the world can be ruled without blood. The civil sword shall and must be red and bloody.“

—  Andrew Jackson American general and politician, 7th president of the United States 1767 - 1845

Martin Luther, Von Kaufhandlung und Wucher, 1524, (Vol. XV, p. 302, of the Weimar edition of Luther's works).
Misattributed

Sitting Bull photo
Elizabeth Gilbert photo
Oswald Chambers photo
Hjalmar Schacht photo

„It has been shown that, in contrast to everything which classical national economy has hitherto taught, not the producer but the consumer is the ruling factor in economic life.“

—  Hjalmar Schacht German politician 1877 - 1970

As quoted Nazi Conspiracy and Aggression (1946) by the United States Department of State, Vol. 2, p. 746.

Nicholas II of Russia photo

„I am not prepared to be Tsar. I never wanted to become one. I know nothing of the business of ruling. I even have no idea how to talk to the ministers.“

—  Nicholas II of Russia Emperor of All the Russias, Grand Duke of Finland and King of Poland By the Grace of God 1868 - 1918

As quoted in [Richard Wortman, Scenarios of Power: From Alexander II to the abdication of Nicholas II, https://books.google.com/books?id=wGp4M2DzfMQC&pg=PA341, 1995, Princeton University Press, 0-691-02947-4, 341–]

John Locke photo

„There cannot any one moral Rule be propos'd, whereof a Man may not justly demand a Reason.“

—  John Locke, book An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

Book I, Ch. 3, sec. 4
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689)

Bidhan Chandra Roy photo
Tamora Pierce photo
Italo Calvino photo

„Cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else.“

—  Italo Calvino, book Invisible Cities

Page 44.
Source: Invisible Cities (1972)
Context: With cities, it is as with dreams: everything imaginable can be dreamed, but even the most unexpected dream is a rebus that conceals a desire or, its reverse, a fear. Cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else.

Susan Neiman photo
Nathuram Godse photo
Matthew Henry photo

„The woman was made of a rib out of the side of Adam; not made out of his head to rule over him, nor out of his feet to be trampled upon by him, but out of his side to be equal with him, under his arm to be protected, and near his heart to be beloved.“

—  Matthew Henry Theologician from Wales 1662 - 1714

Genesis 2:21.
Commentaries
Variant: Eve was not taken out of Adam's head to top him, neither out of his feet to be trampled on by him, but out of his side to be equal with him, under his arm to be protected by him, and near his heart to be loved by him.
Source: Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible

William Hazlitt photo

„Every man, in his own opinion, forms an exception to the ordinary rules of morality.“

—  William Hazlitt English writer 1778 - 1830

No. 305
Characteristics, in the manner of Rochefoucauld's Maxims (1823)

Jane Goodall photo
L. S. Lowry photo

„I see lots of people everywhere, one lot going one way and the other lot going in the opposite way, as a rule.“

—  L. S. Lowry British visual artist 1887 - 1976

Response in a letter to David Carr 9 Dec 1943 concerning his style L. S. Lowry - A Biography by Shelley Rhode Lowry Press 1999 ISBN 9781902970011.
Other

Nicholas Murray Butler photo
Ada Leverson photo
George Bernard Shaw photo
Anne Frank photo

„In a democracy the noble man is condemned to obscurity, prison or death, while scum, liars and degenerates rule.“

—  David Lane (white nationalist) American white supremacist, convicted felon 1938 - 2007

Revolution by Number

„We live entirely under enemy rule, and it is futile, as well as destructive, to debate or even care about what goes on in "their" system.“

—  David Lane (white nationalist) American white supremacist, convicted felon 1938 - 2007

Drugs and Governments
Focus Fourteen

„There is no set sort of rules, or no set sort of formula to the way we work in the studio … so it's difficult to know … what we'll move on to next.“

—  Enya Irish singer, songwriter, and musician 1961

KSCA interview (1996)
Context: There is no set sort of rules, or no set sort of formula to the way we work in the studio... so it's difficult to know... what we'll move on to next. We don't like to say, "Never, no we'd never do this"... But, we... like the setup as far as there's only three people in the studio... because the work is very personal, very intimate, very emotional... and that is very important to the album.

Elfriede Jelinek photo
Bobby Fischer photo
Theodore Roosevelt photo
Francis Bacon photo
Charles R. Drew photo

„I feel that the recent ruling of the United States Army and Navy regarding the refusal of colored blood donors is an indefensible one from any point of view. As you know, there is no scientific basis for the separation of the bloods of different races except on the basis of the individual blood types or groups.“

—  Charles R. Drew African-American physician, surgeon, and medical researcher 1904 - 1950

(1942) Spencie Love, One Blood: The Death and Resurrection of Charles R. Drew (1996) ISBN 0-8078-2250-7, 155-56, quoting as it appeared in Current Biography (1944), 180.

Friedrich Hayek photo

„We do not owe our morals to our intelligence: we owe them to the fact that some groups uncomprehendingly accepted certain rules of conduct — the rules of private property, of honesty, and of the family — that enabled the groups practising them to prosper, multiply, and gradually to displace the others.“

—  Friedrich Hayek Austrian and British economist and Nobel Prize for Economics laureate 1899 - 1992

1980s and later, Knowledge, Evolution and Society (1983), "Coping with Ignorance", "Our Moral Heritage"

Pablo Picasso photo

„Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.“

—  Pablo Picasso Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer 1881 - 1973

Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
Babur photo
Babur photo

„According to old records, it has been a rule with the Muslim rulers from the first to build mosques, monasteries, and inns, spread Islam, and put (a stop to) non-Islamic practices, wherever they found prominence (of kufr). Accordingly, even as they cleared up Mathura, Bindraban etc., from the rubbish of non-Islamic practices, the Babari mosque was built up in AH 923 (?) under the patronage of Sayyid Musa Ashiqan in the Janmasthan temple (butkhane Janmsthan mein) in Faizabad Avadh, which was a great place of (worship) and capital of Rama's father'…'A great mosque was built on the spot where Sita ki Rasoi is situated. During the regime of Babar, the Hindus had no guts to be a match for the Muslims. The mosque was built in AH 923 (?) under the patronage of Sayyid Mir Ashiqan' Aurangzeb built a mosque on the Hanuman Garhi' The Bairagis effaced the mosque and erected a temple in its place. Then idols began to be worshipped openly in the Babari mosque where the Sita ki Rasoi is situated.“

—  Babur 1st Mughal Emperor 1483 - 1530

Muraqqa-i-Khusrawî (Tãrîkh-i-Awadh) by Shykh Azmat Alî Kãkorwî Nãmî , cited by Dr. Harsh Narain, "Rama-Janmabhumi Temple: Muslim Testimony", 1990, and quoted in Goel, S.R. Hindu Temples - What Happened to them.

According to Harsh Narain, the publication of the chapter "dealing with the Jihad led by Amir Ali Amethawi for recapture of Hanuman Garhi from the Bairagis" was suppressed "on the ground that its publication would not be opportune in view of the prevailing political situation". Dr. Kakorawi himself lamented that ‘suppression of any part of any old composition or compilation like this can create difficulties and misunderstandings for future historians and researchers’. Muraqqa-i-Khusrawî (Tãrîkh-i-Awadh) by Shykh Azmat Alî Kãkorwî Nãmî. Shykh Azamat Ali Kakorawi Nami (1811–1893), Muraqqa(h)-i Khusrawi also known as the Tarikh-i Av(w)adh cited by Harsh Narain The Ayodhya Temple Mosque Dispute: Focus on Muslim Sources, 1993, New Delhi, Penman Publications. ISBN 8185504164 Quoted in Dr. Harsh Narain: Rama-Janmabhumi Temple Muslim Testimony Harsh Narain (Indian Express, February 26, 1990) and in Shourie, A., & Goel, S. R. (1990). Hindu temples: What happened to them.
Quotes from Muslim histories of early modern era

Babur photo

„If you desire to rule and conquer, you don't just fold your hands when things go wrong, you act.“

—  Babur 1st Mughal Emperor 1483 - 1530

"History of India" at Amazing World http://www.amworld.info/india-travel/history-of-india; it is not clear in the source cited that this is a quote of Babur — it might be a comment made about him.
Disputed

Ludwig von Mises photo

„He who is unfit to serve his fellow citizens wants to rule them.“

—  Ludwig von Mises, book Bureaucracy

Source: Bureaucracy

Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
Epictetus photo

„Let silence be your general rule; or say only what is necessary and in few words.“

—  Epictetus philosopher from Ancient Greece 50 - 138

Golden Sayings of Epictetus
Context: Let silence be your general rule; or say only what is necessary and in few words. We shall, however, when occasion demands, enter into discourse sparingly, avoiding such common topics as gladiators, horse-races, athletes; and the perpetual talk about food and drink. Above all avoid speaking of persons, either in the way of praise or blame, or comparison. If you can, win over the conversation of your company to what it should be by your own. But if you should find yourself cut off without escape among strangers and aliens, be silent. (164).

Thomas Traherne photo

„Order the beauty even of beauty is,
It is the rule of bliss,
The very life and form and cause of pleasure.“

—  Thomas Traherne English poet 1636 - 1674

"The Vision", stanza 2; The Poetical Works of Thomas Traherne, B.D. (London: Bertram Dobell, 1903) p. 20.

Ernesto Che Guevara photo
Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
George Sutherland photo
Benjamin Creme photo
Jenny Holzer photo
Socrates photo
Bertolt Brecht photo

„All the gang of those who rule us
Hope our quarrels never stop
Helping them to split and fool us
So they can remain on top.“

—  Bertolt Brecht German poet, playwright, theatre director 1898 - 1956

"Solidarity song" [Solidaritätslied] (1931), trans. John Willett in Poems, 1913-1956, p. 186
Poems, 1913-1956 (1976)

Andrew S. Grove photo

„A fundamental rule in technology says that whatever can be done will be done.“

—  Andrew S. Grove Hungarian-born American businessman, engineer, and author 1936 - 2016

Attributed to Andy Grove in: Ciarán Parker (2006) The Thinkers 50: The World's Most Influential Business. p. 70
New millennium

Bernard Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein photo

„The United States has broken the second rule of war. That is: don't go fighting with your land army on the mainland in Asia. Rule One is, don't march on Moscow. I developed those two rules myself.“

—  Bernard Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein British Army officer, Commander of Allied forces at the Battle of El Alamein 1887 - 1976

Interview, 2 July, 1968; quoted in New York Times, 3 July, 1968, p. 6.

Husayn ibn Ali photo
Albert Einstein photo

„Three great forces rule the world: stupidity, fear and greed.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Arthur Ashe photo
Mark Twain photo
Rene Balcer photo

„If you're going to play stickball in Canarsie you better learn Brooklyn rules.“

—  Rene Balcer screenwriter, producer and director 1954

ADA Jack McCoy in the Law & Order episode Blue Bamboo.
Law & Order

Savitri Devi photo
Giordano Bruno photo

„The fools of the world have been those who have established religions, ceremonies, laws, faith, rule of life.“

—  Giordano Bruno Italian philosopher, mathematician and astronomer 1548 - 1600

Cabal of the Cheval Pegasus (1585)
Context: The fools of the world have been those who have established religions, ceremonies, laws, faith, rule of life. The greatest asses of the world are those who, lacking all understanding and instruction, and void of all civil life and custom, rot in perpetual pedantry; those who by the grace of heaven would reform obscure and corrupted faith, salve the cruelties of perverted religion and remove abuse of superstitions, mending the rents in their vesture. It is not they who indulge impious curiosity or who are ever seeking the secrets of nature, and reckoning the courses of the stars. Observe whether they have been busy with the secret causes of things, or if they have condoned the destruction of kingdoms, the dispersion of peoples, fires, blood, ruin or extermination; whether they seek the destruction of the whole world that it may belong to them: in order that the poor soul may be saved, that an edifice may be raised in heaven, that treasure may be laid up in that blessed land, caring naught for fame, profit or glory in this frail and uncertain life, but only for that other most certain and eternal life.

Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
Immanuel Kant photo
Dadabhai Naoroji photo

„More than 20 years earlier a small band of Hindu students and thoughtful gentlemen used to meet secretly to discuss the effects of British rule in India. The home charges and the transfer of capital from India to England in various shapes, and the exclusion of the children of the country from any share or voice in the administration of their own country, formed the chief burden of their complaint.“

—  Dadabhai Naoroji Indian politician 1825 - 1917

As the theoretician of the "Drain Theory", he explained in his lecture delivered at the East Indian Association, London on 2 May 1867 in Forerunners of Dadabhai Naoroji’s Drain Theory, 3 December 2013, Jstor Organization http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/4411389?uid=3738256&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&sid=21103047963541,
Drain Theory

Bob Black photo

„The demeaning system of domination I've described rules over half the waking hours of a majority of women and the vast majority of men for decades, for most of their lifespans.“

—  Bob Black, book The Abolition of Work

The Abolition of Work (1985)
Context: The demeaning system of domination I've described rules over half the waking hours of a majority of women and the vast majority of men for decades, for most of their lifespans. For certain purposes it's not too misleading to call our system democracy or capitalism or — better still — industrialism, but its real names are factory fascism and office oligarchy. Anybody who says these people are "free" is lying or stupid. You are what you do. If you do boring, stupid monotonous work, chances are you'll end up boring, stupid and monotonous. Work is a much better explanation for the creeping cretinization all around us than even such significant moronizing mechanisms as television and education. People who are regimented all their lives, handed off to work from school and bracketed by the family in the beginning and the nursing home at the end, are habituated to heirarchy and psychologically enslaved. Their aptitude for autonomy is so atrophied that their fear of freedom is among their few rationally grounded phobias. Their obedience training at work carries over into the families they start, thus reproducing the system in more ways than one, and into politics, culture and everything else. Once you drain the vitality from people at work, they'll likely submit to heirarchy and expertise in everything. They're used to it.

Charles Grandison Finney photo