Dante Alighieri quotes

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Dante Alighieri

Birthdate: 30. May 1265
Date of death: 14. September 1321

Durante di Alighiero degli Alighieri , commonly known by his pen name Dante Alighieri or simply as Dante , was an Italian poet. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa and later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.In the Late Middle Ages, most poetry was written in Latin, making it accessible only to the most educated readers. In De vulgari eloquentia , however, Dante defended the use of the vernacular in literature. He would even write in the Tuscan dialect for works such as The New Life and the Divine Comedy; this highly unorthodox choice set a precedent that important later Italian writers such as Petrarch and Boccaccio would follow.

Dante was instrumental in establishing the literature of Italy, and his depictions of Hell, Purgatory and Heaven provided inspiration for the larger body of Western art. He is cited as an influence on John Milton, Geoffrey Chaucer and Alfred Tennyson, among many others. In addition, the first use of the interlocking three-line rhyme scheme, or the terza rima, is attributed to him. He is described as the "father" of the Italian language, and in Italy, he is often referred to as il Sommo Poeta . Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio are also called the tre corone of Italian literature.

Works

Inferno
Dante Alighieri
Purgatorio
Purgatorio
Dante Alighieri
Paradiso
Paradiso
Dante Alighieri
Vita Nuova
Dante Alighieri

Quotes Dante Alighieri

„Ye keep your watch in the eternal day.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XXX, line 103 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio
Original: (la) Voi vigilate ne l'etterno die.

„From that point
Dependent is the heaven and nature all.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Paradiso

Canto XXVIII, lines 41–42 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Paradiso
Original: (rm) Da quel punto
depende il cielo e tutta la natura.

„To her perfection all of beauty tends.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Vita Nuova

Source: La Vita Nuova (1293), Chapter XIV, lines 49–50 (tr. Barbara Reynolds)
Context: She is the sum of nature's universe.
To her perfection all of beauty tends.

„But now was turning my desire and will,
Even as a wheel that equally is moved,“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Paradiso

Canto XXXIII, closing lines, as translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Paradiso
Context: p>As the geometrician, who endeavours
To square the circle, and discovers not,
By taking thought, the principle he wants,Even such was I at that new apparition;
I wished to see how the image to the circle
Conformed itself, and how it there finds place;But my own wings were not enough for this,
Had it not been that then my mind there smote
A flash of lightning, wherein came its wish. Here vigour failed the lofty fantasy:
But now was turning my desire and will,
Even as a wheel that equally is moved,The Love which moves the sun and the other stars.</p

„The Love which moves the sun and the other stars.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Paradiso

Canto XXXIII, closing lines, as translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Paradiso
Context: p>As the geometrician, who endeavours
To square the circle, and discovers not,
By taking thought, the principle he wants,Even such was I at that new apparition;
I wished to see how the image to the circle
Conformed itself, and how it there finds place;But my own wings were not enough for this,
Had it not been that then my mind there smote
A flash of lightning, wherein came its wish. Here vigour failed the lofty fantasy:
But now was turning my desire and will,
Even as a wheel that equally is moved,The Love which moves the sun and the other stars.</p

„Do you not know that we are worms and born
To form the angelic butterfly that soars,
Without defenses, to confront His judgment?“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto X, lines 121–129 (tr. Mandelbaum).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio
Context: O Christians, arrogant, exhausted, wretched,
Whose intellects are sick and cannot see,
Who place your confidence in backward steps,
Do you not know that we are worms and born
To form the angelic butterfly that soars,
Without defenses, to confront His judgment?
Why does your mind presume to flight when you
Are still like the imperfect grub, the worm
Before it has attained its final form?

„How long in woman lasts the fire of love,
If eye or touch do not relight it often.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto VIII, lines 77–78 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

„In his arms, my lady lay asleep, wrapped in a veil.
He woke her then and trembling and obedient
She ate that burning heart out of his hand;
Weeping I saw him then depart from me.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Vita Nuova

ne le braccia avea
madonna involta in un drappo dormendo.
Poi la svegliava, e d'esto core ardendo
lei paventosa umilmente pascea:
appresso gir lo ne vedea piangendo.
Source: La Vita Nuova (1293), Chapter I, First Sonnet (tr. Mark Musa)

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„He listens well who takes notes.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Inferno

Canto XV, line 99 (tr. Clive James).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Inferno

„He goes seeking liberty, which is so dear, as he knows who gives his life for it.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto I, lines 71–72 (tr. Sinclair).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

„Time moves and yet we do not notice it.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto IV, line 9 (tr. Mandelbaum).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

„As the thing more perfect is,
The more it feels of pleasure and of pain.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Inferno

Canto VI, lines 107–108 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Inferno

„Behold a God more powerful than I who comes to rule over me.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Vita Nuova

Original: (la) Ecce deus fortior me, qui veniens dominabitur mihi.
Source: La Vita Nuova (1293), Chapter I (tr. Barbara Reynolds); of love.

„A thing done has an end!“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Inferno

Canto XXVIII, line 107 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Inferno

„Behold the grass, the flowerets, and the shrubs
Which of itself alone this land produces.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XXVII, lines 134–135 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

„O human race, born to fly upward, wherefore at a little wind dost thou so fall?“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XII, lines 95–96 (tr. C. E. Norton).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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