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Horace

Birthdate: 8. December 65 BC
Date of death: 27. November 8 BC
Other names: Quintus Flaccus Horatius, Flaccus Quintus Horatius, Квинт Гораций Флакк

Quintus Horatius Flaccus , known in the English-speaking world as Horace , was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus . The rhetorician Quintilian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words."Horace also crafted elegant hexameter verses and caustic iambic poetry . The hexameters are amusing yet serious works, friendly in tone, leading the ancient satirist Persius to comment: "as his friend laughs, Horace slyly puts his finger on his every fault; once let in, he plays about the heartstrings".His career coincided with Rome's momentous change from a republic to an empire. An officer in the republican army defeated at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, he was befriended by Octavian's right-hand man in civil affairs, Maecenas, and became a spokesman for the new regime. For some commentators, his association with the regime was a delicate balance in which he maintained a strong measure of independence but for others he was, in John Dryden's phrase, "a well-mannered court slave".

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Works

Epistles
Horace
Odes
Horace
Satires
Horace

„Conquered Greece took captive her savage conqueror and brought her arts into rustic Latium.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book II, epistle i, lines 156–157
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit et artes intulit agresti Latio.

„I am not bound over to swear allegiance to any master; where the storm drives me I turn in for shelter.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle i, line 14
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nullius addictus iurare in verba magistri,
quo me cumque rapit tempestas, deferor hospes.

„He is not poor who has enough of things to use. If it is well with your belly, chest and feet, the wealth of kings can give you nothing more.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xii, line 4
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Pauper enim non est, cui rerum suppetit usus.
si ventri bene, si lateri est pedibusque tuis, nil
divitiae poterunt regales addere maius.

„Anger is a momentary madness so control your passion or it will control you.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, line 62
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Ira furor brevis est: animum rege: qui nisi paret
imperat.

„For why do you hasten to remove things that hurt your eyes, but if anything gnaws your mind, defer the time of curing it from year to year?“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, lines 37–39; translation by C. Smart
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nam cur
quae laedunt oculum festinas demere; si quid
est animum, differs curandi tempus in annum?

„We are but numbers, born to consume resources.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, line 27
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nos numerus sumus et fruges consumere nati.

„A host is like a general: calamities often reveal his genius.“

—  Horace, book Satires

Sed convivatoris uti ducis ingenium res
Adversae nudare solent, celare secundae.
Book II, satire viii, lines 73–74 http://books.google.com/books?id=hlgNAAAAYAAJ&q=%22Sed+convivatoris+uti+ducis+ingenium+res+Adversae+nudare+solent+celare+secundae%22&pg=PA360#v=onepage
Satires (c. 35 BC and 30 BC)
Original: (la) Sed convivatoris uti ducis ingenium res
Adversae nudare solent, celare secundae.

„Once a word has been allowed to escape, it cannot be recalled.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 71
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Semel emissum volat irrevocabile verbum.

„When you wish to instruct, be brief; that men’s minds may take in quickly what you say, learn its lesson, and retain it faithfully. Every word that is unnecessary only pours over the side of a brimming mind.“

—  Horace, Ars Poetica

Original: (la) Quidquid praecipies, esto brevis, ut cito dicta
percipiant animi dociles teneantque fideles:
omne supervacuum pleno de pectore manat.
Source: Ars Poetica, or The Epistle to the Pisones (c. 18 BC), Lines 335–337; Edward Charles Wickham translation

„I have made a monument more lasting than bronze.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Book III, ode xxx, line 1
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Exegi monumentum aere perennius

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„For nature forms our spirits to receive
Each bent that outward circumstance can give:
She kindles pleasure, bids resentment glow,
Or bows the soul to earth in hopeless woe.“

—  Horace, Ars Poetica

Original: (la) Format enim Natura prius nos intus ad omnem
Fortunarum habitum, juvat, aut impellit ad iram,
Aut ad humum moerore gravi deducit, et angit.
Source: Ars Poetica, or The Epistle to the Pisones (c. 18 BC), Line 108 (tr. Conington)

„At times the world sees straight, but many times the world goes astray.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book II, epistle i, line 63
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Interdum volgus rectum videt, est ubi peccat.

„As money grows, care follows it and the hunger for more.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Crescentem sequitur cura pecuniam,
Maiorumque fames.

„Force without wisdom falls of its own weight.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Book III, ode iv, line 65
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)

„The Muse gave the Greeks their native character, and allowed them to speak in noble tones, they who desired nothing but praise.“

—  Horace, Ars Poetica

Grais ingenium, Grais dedit ore rotundo
Musa loqui, præter laudem nullius avaris. . .

Line 323
Ars Poetica, or The Epistle to the Pisones (c. 18 BC)
Original: (la) Grais ingenium, Grais dedit ore rotundo
Musa loqui, præter laudem nullius avaris. . .

„To flee vice is the beginning of virtue, and to have got rid of folly is the beginning of wisdom.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Virtus est vitium fugere et sapientia prima
stultitia caruisse.

„Some faults may claim forgiveness.“

—  Horace, Ars Poetica

Original: (la) Sunt delicta tamen quibus ignovisse velimus.
Source: Ars Poetica, or The Epistle to the Pisones (c. 18 BC), Line 347 (tr. Conington)

„None knows the reason why this curse
Was sent on him, this love of making verse.“

—  Horace, Ars Poetica

Original: (la) Nec satis apparet, cur versus factitet.
Source: Ars Poetica, or The Epistle to the Pisones (c. 18 BC), Line 470 (tr. Conington)

„Leave all else to the gods.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Book I, ode ix, line 9
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Permitte divis cetera.

„Let hopes and sorrows, fears and angers be,
And think each day that dawns the last you'll see;
For so the hour that greets you unforeseen
Will bring with it enjoyment twice as keen.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle iv, line 12 (translated by John Conington)
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Inter spem curamque, timores inter et iras,
Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum:
Grata superveniet quae non sperabitur hora.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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