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Horace

Birthdate: 8. December 65 BC
Date of death: 27. November 8 BC
Other names: Quintus Flaccus Horatius, Flaccus Quintus Horatius, Квинт Гораций Флакк

Quintus Horatius Flaccus , known in the English-speaking world as Horace , was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus . The rhetorician Quintilian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words."Horace also crafted elegant hexameter verses and caustic iambic poetry . The hexameters are amusing yet serious works, friendly in tone, leading the ancient satirist Persius to comment: "as his friend laughs, Horace slyly puts his finger on his every fault; once let in, he plays about the heartstrings".His career coincided with Rome's momentous change from a republic to an empire. An officer in the republican army defeated at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, he was befriended by Octavian's right-hand man in civil affairs, Maecenas, and became a spokesman for the new regime. For some commentators, his association with the regime was a delicate balance in which he maintained a strong measure of independence but for others he was, in John Dryden's phrase, "a well-mannered court slave".

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Works

Epistles
Horace
Odes
Horace
Satires
Horace

„I am not bound over to swear allegiance to any master; where the storm drives me I turn in for shelter.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle i, line 14
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nullius addictus iurare in verba magistri,
quo me cumque rapit tempestas, deferor hospes.

„He is not poor who has enough of things to use.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xii, line 4
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Pauper enim non est, cui rerum suppetit usus.
si ventri bene, si lateri est pedibusque tuis, nil
divitiae poterunt regales addere maius.
Context: He is not poor who has enough of things to use. If it is well with your belly, chest and feet, the wealth of kings can give you nothing more.

„What the discordant harmony of circumstances would and could effect.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xii, line 19
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Quid velit et possit rerum concordia discors

„Anger is a momentary madness so control your passion or it will control you.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, line 62
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Ira furor brevis est: animum rege: qui nisi paret
imperat.

„This to the right, that to the left hand strays,
And all are wrong, but wrong in different ways.“

—  Horace, book Satires

Book II, satire iii, line 50 (trans. Conington)
Satires (c. 35 BC and 30 BC)
Original: (la) Ille sinistrorsum, hie dextrorsum abit : unus utrique
Error, sed variis illudit partibus.

„So live, my boys, as brave men; and if fortune is adverse, front its blows with brave hearts.“

—  Horace, book Satires

Book II, Satire II, Line 135-136 (trans. E. C. Wickham)
Satires (c. 35 BC and 30 BC)
Original: (la) Quocirca vivite fortes, fortiaque adversis opponite pectora rebus

„In vain did Nature's wife command
Divide the waters from the land,
If daring ships and men profane,
Invade th' inviolable main.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Book I, ode iii, line 21 (trans. by John Dryden)
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Nequiquam deus abscidit
Prudens Oceano dissociabili
Terras, si tamen impiae
Non tangenda rates transiliunt vada.

„Once a word has been allowed to escape, it cannot be recalled.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 71
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Semel emissum volat irrevocabile verbum.

„Conquered Greece took captive her savage conqueror and brought her arts into rustic Latium.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book II, epistle i, lines 156–157
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit et artes intulit agresti Latio.

„Sky, not spirit, do they change, those who cross the sea.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xi, line 27
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Caelum, non animum mutant, qui trans mare currunt.

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„Think to yourself that every day is your last; the hour to which you do not look forward will come as a welcome surprise.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle iv, line 13–14
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum.
grata superveniet, quae non sperabitur hora.

„If you wish me to weep, you yourself
Must first feel grief.“

—  Horace, Ars Poetica

Original: (la) Si vis me flere, dolendum est
primum ipsi tibi.
Source: Ars Poetica, or The Epistle to the Pisones (c. 18 BC), Line 102

„I sing for maidens and boys.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Book III, ode i, line 4
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Virginibus puerisque canto.

„We are but numbers, born to consume resources.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, line 27
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nos numerus sumus et fruges consumere nati.

„Life grants nothing to us mortals without hard work.“

—  Horace, book Satires

Book I, satire ix, line 59
Satires (c. 35 BC and 30 BC)
Original: (la) Nil sine magno
vita labore dedit mortalibus.

„The mind enamored with deceptive things, declines things better.“

—  Horace, book Satires

Book II, satire ii, line 6
Satires (c. 35 BC and 30 BC)
Original: (la) Adclinis falsis animus meliora recusat.

„For why do you hasten to remove things that hurt your eyes, but if anything gnaws your mind, defer the time of curing it from year to year?“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, lines 37–39; translation by C. Smart
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nam cur
quae laedunt oculum festinas demere; si quid
est animum, differs curandi tempus in annum?

„We are but dust and shadow.“

—  Horace, book Odes

Book IV, ode vii, line 16
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Pulvis et umbra sumus.

„Natales grate numeras?“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Do you count your birthdays with gratitude?
Book II, epistle ii, line 210
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)

„It is your concern when your neighbor's wall is on fire.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 84
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nam tua res agitur, paries cum proximus ardet.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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