Quotes from book
Epistles

HoraceOriginal title Sermones (Latin)

The Epistles of Horace were published in two books, in 20 BCE and 14 BCE, respectively.


Horace photo

„Conquered Greece took captive her savage conqueror and brought her arts into rustic Latium.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book II, epistle i, lines 156–157
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit et artes intulit agresti Latio.

Horace photo

„I am not bound over to swear allegiance to any master; where the storm drives me I turn in for shelter.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle i, line 14
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nullius addictus iurare in verba magistri,
quo me cumque rapit tempestas, deferor hospes.

Horace photo

„Anger is a momentary madness so control your passion or it will control you.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, line 62
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Ira furor brevis est: animum rege: qui nisi paret
imperat.

Horace photo

„For why do you hasten to remove things that hurt your eyes, but if anything gnaws your mind, defer the time of curing it from year to year?“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, lines 37–39; translation by C. Smart
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nam cur
quae laedunt oculum festinas demere; si quid
est animum, differs curandi tempus in annum?

Horace photo

„We are but numbers, born to consume resources.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle ii, line 27
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nos numerus sumus et fruges consumere nati.

Horace photo

„Once a word has been allowed to escape, it cannot be recalled.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 71
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Semel emissum volat irrevocabile verbum.

Horace photo

„At times the world sees straight, but many times the world goes astray.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book II, epistle i, line 63
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Interdum volgus rectum videt, est ubi peccat.

Horace photo

„To flee vice is the beginning of virtue, and to have got rid of folly is the beginning of wisdom.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Virtus est vitium fugere et sapientia prima
stultitia caruisse.

Horace photo

„Let hopes and sorrows, fears and angers be,
And think each day that dawns the last you'll see;
For so the hour that greets you unforeseen
Will bring with it enjoyment twice as keen.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle iv, line 12 (translated by John Conington)
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Inter spem curamque, timores inter et iras,
Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum:
Grata superveniet quae non sperabitur hora.

Horace photo

„It is your concern when your neighbor's wall is on fire.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 84
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nam tua res agitur, paries cum proximus ardet.

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Horace photo

„As for me, when you want a good laugh, you will find me in fine state… fat and sleek, a true hog of Epicurus' herd.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle iv, lines 15–16
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Me pinguem et nitidum bene curata cute vises,
cum ridere voles Epicuri de grege porcum.

Horace photo

„The years as they pass plunder us of one thing after another.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book II, epistle ii, line 55
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Singula de nobis anni praedantur euntes.

Horace photo

„You may drive out Nature with a pitchfork, yet she still will hurry back.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret.

Horace photo

„To have a great man for an intimate friend seems pleasant to those who have never tried it; those who have, fear it.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 86
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Dulcis inexpertis cultura potentis amici; Expertus metuit. http://books.google.com/books?id=BGxQAAAAcAAJ&q=%22Dulcis+inexpertis+cultura+potentis+amici+Expertus+metuit%22&pg=PA207#v=onepage

Horace photo

„Think to yourself that every day is your last; the hour to which you do not look forward will come as a welcome surprise.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle iv, line 13–14
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum.
grata superveniet, quae non sperabitur hora.

Horace photo

„Sky, not spirit, do they change, those who cross the sea.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xi, line 27
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Caelum, non animum mutant, qui trans mare currunt.

Horace photo

„What the discordant harmony of circumstances would and could effect.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xii, line 19
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Quid velit et possit rerum concordia discors

Horace photo

„Look round and round the man you recommend,
For yours will be the shame should he offend.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xviii, line 76 (translated by John Conington).
Variant translation: Study carefully the character of the one you recommend, lest his misdeeds bring you shame.
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Qualem commendes, etiam atque etiam aspice, ne mox incutiant aliena tibi peccata pudorem.

Horace photo

„He who feared that he would not succeed sat still.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xvii, line 37
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Sedit qui timuit ne non succederet.

Horace photo

„For joys fall not to the rich alone, nor has he lived ill, who from birth to death has passed unknown.“

—  Horace, book Epistles

Book I, epistle xvii, line 9
Epistles (c. 20 BC and 14 BC)
Original: (la) Nam neque divitibus contingunt gaudia solis,
nec vixit male, qui natus moriensque fefellit.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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