„It is in the body politic, as in the natural, those disorders are most dangerous that flow from the head.“

—  Pliny the Younger, Letter 22, 7.
Original

Utque in corporibus sic in imperio gravissimus est morbus, qui a capite diffunditur.

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Pliny the Younger50
Roman writer 61 - 113
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