Quotes from book
Purgatorio

Purgatorio
Dante AlighieriOriginal title Purgatorio (Italian, 1316)

Purgatorio is the second part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno, and preceding the Paradiso. The poem was written in the early 14th century. It is an allegory telling of the climb of Dante up the Mount of Purgatory, guided by the Roman poet Virgil, except for the last four cantos at which point Beatrice takes over as Dante's guide.


Dante Alighieri photo

„Ye keep your watch in the eternal day.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XXX, line 103 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio
Original: (la) Voi vigilate ne l'etterno die.

Dante Alighieri photo

„For to lose time irks him most who most knows.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto III, line 78 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

„Less than a drop of blood remains in me that does not tremble; I recognize the signals of the ancient flame.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XXX, lines 46–48.
Compare: Agnosco veteris vestigia flammae ("I feel once more the scars of the old flame", tr. C. Day Lewis), Virgil, Aeneid, Book IV, line 23.
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo
Dante Alighieri photo

„Give us this day the daily manna, without which, in this rough desert, he backward goes, who toils most to go on.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XI, lines 13–15 (tr. C. E. Norton).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

„Behold the grass, the flowerets, and the shrubs
Which of itself alone this land produces.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XXVII, lines 134–135 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

„Time moves and yet we do not notice it.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto IV, line 9 (tr. Mandelbaum).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo
Dante Alighieri photo

„Love kindled by virtue always kindles another, provided that its flame appear outwardly.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XXII, lines 10–12.
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

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Dante Alighieri photo
Dante Alighieri photo

„To run over better waters the little vessel of my genius now hoists her sails, as she leaves behind her a sea so cruel.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto I, lines 1–3 (tr. C. E. Norton).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

„Each one confusedly a good conceives
Wherein the mind may rest, and longeth for it;
Therefore to overtake it each one strives.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XVII, lines 127–129 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

„Do you not know that we are worms and born
To form the angelic butterfly that soars,
Without defenses, to confront His judgment?“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto X, lines 121–129 (tr. Mandelbaum).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio
Context: O Christians, arrogant, exhausted, wretched,
Whose intellects are sick and cannot see,
Who place your confidence in backward steps,
Do you not know that we are worms and born
To form the angelic butterfly that soars,
Without defenses, to confront His judgment?
Why does your mind presume to flight when you
Are still like the imperfect grub, the worm
Before it has attained its final form?

Dante Alighieri photo

„How long in woman lasts the fire of love,
If eye or touch do not relight it often.“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto VIII, lines 77–78 (tr. Longfellow).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo
Dante Alighieri photo

„O human race, born to fly upward, wherefore at a little wind dost thou so fall?“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto XII, lines 95–96 (tr. C. E. Norton).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo

„O conscience, upright and stainless, how bitter a sting to thee is little fault!“

—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

Canto III, lines 8–9 (tr. C. E. Norton).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Purgatorio

Dante Alighieri photo
Dante Alighieri photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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