Samuel Taylor Coleridge quotes

Samuel Taylor Coleridge photo
219   6

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Birthdate: 21. October 1772
Date of death: 25. July 1834

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He also shared volumes and collaborated with Charles Lamb, Robert Southey, and Charles Lloyd. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief. He had a major influence on Ralph Waldo Emerson and American transcendentalism.

Throughout his adult life Coleridge had crippling bouts of anxiety and depression; it has been speculated that he had bipolar disorder, which had not been defined during his lifetime. He was physically unhealthy, which may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these conditions with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction. Wikipedia

Works

Biographia Literaria
Biographia Literaria
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Christabel
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Kubla Khan
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Dejection: An Ode
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Frost at Midnight
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

„The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other according to their relative worth and dignity.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge, book Biographia Literaria

Source: Biographia Literaria (1817), Ch. XIV.
Context: The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which I would exclusively appropriate the name of Imagination.

„From my early reading of Faery Tales, & Genii &c &c — my mind had been habituated to the Vast — & I never regarded my senses in any way as the criteria of my belief.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Letter to Thomas Poole (16 October 1797).
Letters
Context: From my early reading of Faery Tales, & Genii &c &c — my mind had been habituated to the Vast — & I never regarded my senses in any way as the criteria of my belief. I regulated all my creeds by my conceptions not by my sight — even at that age. Should children be permitted to read Romances, & Relations of Giants & Magicians, & Genii? — I know all that has been said against it; but I have formed my faith in the affirmative. — I know no other way of giving the mind a love of "the Great," & "the Whole." — Those who have been led by the same truths step by step thro' the constant testimony of their senses, seem to me to want a sense which I possess — They contemplate nothing but parts — and are parts are necessarily little — and the Universe to them is but a mass of little things. It is true, the mind may become credulous and prone to superstition by the former method; — but are not the experimentalists credulous even to madness in believing any absurdity, rather than believe the grandest truths, if they have not the testimony of their own senses in their favor? I have known some who have been rationally educated, as it is styled. They were marked by a microscopic acuteness; but when they looked at great things, all became a blank, and they saw nothing, and denied that any thing could be seen, and uniformly put the negative of a power for the possession of a power, and called the want of imagination judgment, and the never being moved to rapture philosophy.

„Unchanged within, to see all changed without,
Is a blank lot and hard to bear, no doubt.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Duty Surviving Self-Love (1826)
Context: Unchanged within, to see all changed without,
Is a blank lot and hard to bear, no doubt.
Yet why at others' Wanings should'st thou fret?
Then only might'st thou feel a just regret,
Hadst thou withheld thy love or hid thy light
In selfish forethought of neglect and slight.

„Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve,
And Hope without an object cannot live.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Source: Work Without Hope (1825), l. 9.
Context: Bloom, O ye Amaranths! bloom for whom ye may,
For me ye bloom not! Glide, rich streams, away!
With lips unbrightened, wreathless brow, I stroll:
And would you learn the spells that drowse my soul?
Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve,
And Hope without an object cannot live.

„I am by the law of my nature a reasoner. A person who should suppose I meant by that word, an arguer, would not only not understand me, but would understand the contrary of my meaning.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

1 March 1834.
Table Talk (1821–1834)
Context: I am by the law of my nature a reasoner. A person who should suppose I meant by that word, an arguer, would not only not understand me, but would understand the contrary of my meaning. I can take no interest whatever in hearing or saying any thing merely as a fact — merely as having happened. It must refer to something within me before I can regard it with any curiosity or care. My mind is always energic — I don't mean energetic; I require in every thing what, for lack of another word, I may call propriety, — that is, a reason why the thing is at all, and why it is there or then rather than elsewhere or at another time.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„This power…reveals itself in the balance or reconcilement of opposite or discordant qualities: of sameness, with difference; of the general with the concrete; the idea with the image; the individual with the representative“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge, book Biographia Literaria

Source: Biographia Literaria (1817), Ch. XIV.
Context: This power... reveals itself in the balance or reconcilement of opposite or discordant qualities: of sameness, with difference; of the general with the concrete; the idea with the image; the individual with the representative; the sense of novelty and freshness with old and familiar objects; a more than usual state of emotion with more than usual order; judgment ever awake and steady self-possession with enthusiasm and feeling profound or vehement; and while it blends and harmonizes the natural and the artificial, still subordinates art to nature; the manner to the matter; and our admiration of the poet to our sympathy with the poetry.

„Great hierarch! tell thou the silent sky,
And tell the stars, and tell yon rising sun,
Earth, with her thousand voices, praises God.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

"Hymn in the Vale of Chamouni" (1802)
Context: Solemnly seemest like a vapoury cloud
To rise before me — Rise, oh, ever rise;
Rise like a cloud of incense from the earth!
Thou kingly spirit throned among the hills,
Thou dread ambassador from earth to heaven,
Great hierarch! tell thou the silent sky,
And tell the stars, and tell yon rising sun,
Earth, with her thousand voices, praises God.

„I require in every thing what, for lack of another word, I may call propriety, — that is, a reason why the thing is at all, and why it is there or then rather than elsewhere or at another time.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

1 March 1834.
Table Talk (1821–1834)
Context: I am by the law of my nature a reasoner. A person who should suppose I meant by that word, an arguer, would not only not understand me, but would understand the contrary of my meaning. I can take no interest whatever in hearing or saying any thing merely as a fact — merely as having happened. It must refer to something within me before I can regard it with any curiosity or care. My mind is always energic — I don't mean energetic; I require in every thing what, for lack of another word, I may call propriety, — that is, a reason why the thing is at all, and why it is there or then rather than elsewhere or at another time.

„His rapid descents from the hyper-tragic to the infra-colloquial, though sometimes productive of great effect, are often unreasonable. To see him act, is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

17 April 1823.
Table Talk (1821–1834)
Context: Kean is original; but he copies from himself. His rapid descents from the hyper-tragic to the infra-colloquial, though sometimes productive of great effect, are often unreasonable. To see him act, is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning. I do not think him thorough-bred gentleman enough to play Othello.

„Awake, my soul! not only passive praise
Thou owest!“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

"Hymn in the Vale of Chamouni" (1802)
Context: Awake, my soul! not only passive praise
Thou owest! not alone these swelling tears,
Mute thanks and secret ecstasy. Awake,
Voice of sweet song! awake, my heart, awake!
Green vales and icy cliffs, all join my hymn.

„A proper farce is mainly distinguished from comedy by the licence allowed, and even required, in the fable, in order to produce strange and laughable situations. The story need not be probable, it is enough that it is possible.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge, book Biographia Literaria

On The Comedy of Errors, in Ch. XV.
Biographia Literaria (1817)
Context: The myriad-minded man, our, and all men's, Shakespeare, has in this piece presented us with a legitimate farce in exactest consonance with the philosophical principles and character of farce, as distinguished from comedy and from entertainments. A proper farce is mainly distinguished from comedy by the licence allowed, and even required, in the fable, in order to produce strange and laughable situations. The story need not be probable, it is enough that it is possible.

„The proper and immediate object of science is the acquirement, or communication, of truth; the proper and immediate object of poetry is the communication of immediate pleasure.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

"Definitions of Poetry" (1811).
Context: Poetry is not the proper antithesis to prose, but to science. Poetry is opposed to science, and prose to metre. The proper and immediate object of science is the acquirement, or communication, of truth; the proper and immediate object of poetry is the communication of immediate pleasure.

„The Beautiful arises from the perceived harmony of an object, whether sight or sound, with the inborn and constitutive rules of the judgment and imagination: and it is always intuitive.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

On the Principles of Genial Criticism (1814)
Context: The Good consists in the congruity of a thing with the laws of the reason and the nature of the will, and in its fitness to determine the latter to actualize the former: and it is always discursive. The Beautiful arises from the perceived harmony of an object, whether sight or sound, with the inborn and constitutive rules of the judgment and imagination: and it is always intuitive.

„Flowers are lovely; love is flower-like;
Friendship is a sheltering tree“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge

"Youth and Age", st. 2 (1823–1832).
Context: Flowers are lovely; love is flower-like;
Friendship is a sheltering tree;
Oh the joys that came down shower-like,
Of friendship, love, and liberty,
Ere I was old!

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Similar authors

Matthew Arnold photo
Matthew Arnold166
English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector…
Henri-Frédéric Amiel photo
Henri-Frédéric Amiel50
Swiss philosopher and poet
Heinrich Heine photo
Heinrich Heine60
German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic
Percy Bysshe Shelley photo
Percy Bysshe Shelley245
English Romantic poet
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo
Ralph Waldo Emerson728
American philosopher, essayist, and poet
Edgar Allan Poe photo
Edgar Allan Poe124
American author, poet, editor and literary critic
William Blake photo
William Blake249
English Romantic poet and artist
Elizabeth Barrett Browning photo
Elizabeth Barrett Browning88
English poet, author
Charles Dickens photo
Charles Dickens115
English writer and social critic and a Journalist
Robert Browning photo
Robert Browning178
English poet and playwright of the Victorian Era
Today anniversaries
Pablo Neruda photo
Pablo Neruda136
Chilean poet 1904 - 1973
Padre Pio photo
Padre Pio10
Italian saint, priest, stigmatist and mystic 1887 - 1968
Sigmund Freud photo
Sigmund Freud145
Austrian neurologist known as the founding father of psycho… 1856 - 1939
A.S. Neill photo
A.S. Neill8
Scottish educator and theorist 1883 - 1973
Another 60 today anniversaries
Similar authors
Matthew Arnold photo
Matthew Arnold166
English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector…
Henri-Frédéric Amiel photo
Henri-Frédéric Amiel50
Swiss philosopher and poet
Heinrich Heine photo
Heinrich Heine60
German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic
Percy Bysshe Shelley photo
Percy Bysshe Shelley245
English Romantic poet
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo
Ralph Waldo Emerson728
American philosopher, essayist, and poet