Heinrich Heine quotes

Heinrich Heine photo
60   14

Heinrich Heine

Birthdate: 13. December 1797
Date of death: 17. February 1856

Christian Johann Heinrich Heine was a German poet, writer and literary critic. He is best known outside Germany for his early lyric poetry, which was set to music in the form of lieder by composers such as Robert Schumann and Franz Schubert. Heine's later verse and prose are distinguished by their satirical wit and irony. He is considered part of the Young Germany movement. His radical political views led to many of his works being banned by German authorities—which, however, only added to his fame. He spent the last 25 years of his life as an expatriate in Paris. Wikipedia

Works

Wartet nur
Heinrich Heine
Heinrich Heine
Heinrich Heine
Almansor
Heinrich Heine
Citát „When words leave off, music begins.“

„When words leave off, music begins.“

—  Heinrich Heine

As quoted in Peter's Quotations : Ideas for Our Time (1977) by Laurence J. Peter, p. 343

„Whatever tears one may shed, in the end one always blows one's nose.“

—  Heinrich Heine

As quoted in The Routledge Dictionary of Quotations (1987) by Robert Andrews, p. 60

„No talent, but a character.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Atta Troll, ch. 24 (1843)

„You're lovely as a flower,
So pure and fair to see;
I look at you, and sadness
Comes stealing over me.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Du bist wie eine Blume,
So hold und schön und rein;
Ich schau dich an, und Wehmut
Schleicht mir ins Herz hinein.
Du Bist Wie eine Blume, st. 1

„My songs, they say, are poisoned.
How else, love, could it be?
Thou hast, with deadly magic,
Poured poison into me.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Lyrical Intermezzo, 57; in Poems of Heinrich Heine: Three Hundred and Twenty-five Poems (1917) Selected and translated by Louis Untermeyer, p. 73

„Experience is a good school. But the fees are high.“

—  Heinrich Heine

As quoted in The Modern Handbook of Humor (1967) by Ralph Louis Woods, p. 493

„The duration of religions has always been dependent on human need for them. Christianity has been a blessing for suffering humanity during eighteen centuries ; it has been providential, divine, holy. All that it has done in the interest of civilisation, curbing the strong and strengthening the weak, binding together the nations through a common sympathy and a common tongue, and all else that its apologists have urged in its praise all this is as nothing compared with that great consolation it has bestowed on man. Eternal praise is due to the symbol of that suffering God, the Saviour with the crown of thorns, the crucified Christ, whose blood was as a healing balm that flowed into the wounds of humanity. The poet especially must acknowledge with reverence the terrible sublimity of this symbol.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Religion and Philosophy in Germany, A fragment https://archive.org/stream/religionandphilo011616mbp#page/n5/mode/2up. p. 25
Context: I believe in progress; I believe that happiness is the goal of humanity, and I cherish a higher idea of the Divine Being than those pious folk who suppose that man was created only to suffer. Even here on earth I would strive, through the blessings of free political and industrial institutions, to bring about that reign of felicity which, in the opinion of the pious, is to be postponed till heaven is reached after the day of Judgment. The one expectation is perhaps as vain as the other; there may be no resurrection of humanity either in a political or in a religious sense. Mankind, it may be, is doomed to eternal misery; the nations are perhaps under a perpetual curse, condemned to be trodden under foot by despots, to be made the instruments of their accomplices and the laughing-stocks of their menials. Yet, though all this be the case, it will be the duty even of those who regard Christianity as an error still to uphold it; and men must journey barefoot through Europe, wearing monks' cowls, preaching the doctrine of renunciation and the vanity of all earthly possessions, holding up before the gaze of a scourged and despised humanity the consoling Cross, and promising, after death, all the glories of heaven.
The duration of religions has always been dependent on human need for them. Christianity has been a blessing for suffering humanity during eighteen centuries; it has been providential, divine, holy. All that it has done in the interest of civilisation, curbing the strong and strengthening the weak, binding together the nations through a common sympathy and a common tongue, and all else that its apologists have urged in its praise all this is as nothing compared with that great consolation it has bestowed on man. Eternal praise is due to the symbol of that suffering God, the Saviour with the crown of thorns, the crucified Christ, whose blood was as a healing balm that flowed into the wounds of humanity. The poet especially must acknowledge with reverence the terrible sublimity of this symbol.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„I believe in progress; I believe that happiness is the goal of humanity, and I cherish a higher idea of the Divine Being than those pious folk who suppose that man was created only to suffer.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Religion and Philosophy in Germany, A fragment https://archive.org/stream/religionandphilo011616mbp#page/n5/mode/2up. p. 25
Context: I believe in progress; I believe that happiness is the goal of humanity, and I cherish a higher idea of the Divine Being than those pious folk who suppose that man was created only to suffer. Even here on earth I would strive, through the blessings of free political and industrial institutions, to bring about that reign of felicity which, in the opinion of the pious, is to be postponed till heaven is reached after the day of Judgment. The one expectation is perhaps as vain as the other; there may be no resurrection of humanity either in a political or in a religious sense. Mankind, it may be, is doomed to eternal misery; the nations are perhaps under a perpetual curse, condemned to be trodden under foot by despots, to be made the instruments of their accomplices and the laughing-stocks of their menials. Yet, though all this be the case, it will be the duty even of those who regard Christianity as an error still to uphold it; and men must journey barefoot through Europe, wearing monks' cowls, preaching the doctrine of renunciation and the vanity of all earthly possessions, holding up before the gaze of a scourged and despised humanity the consoling Cross, and promising, after death, all the glories of heaven.
The duration of religions has always been dependent on human need for them. Christianity has been a blessing for suffering humanity during eighteen centuries; it has been providential, divine, holy. All that it has done in the interest of civilisation, curbing the strong and strengthening the weak, binding together the nations through a common sympathy and a common tongue, and all else that its apologists have urged in its praise all this is as nothing compared with that great consolation it has bestowed on man. Eternal praise is due to the symbol of that suffering God, the Saviour with the crown of thorns, the crucified Christ, whose blood was as a healing balm that flowed into the wounds of humanity. The poet especially must acknowledge with reverence the terrible sublimity of this symbol.

„Oh what lies there are in kisses!
And their guile so well prepared!
Sweet the snaring is; but this is
Sweeter still, to be ensnared.“

—  Heinrich Heine

The Home-coming, Poem 74; also in Poems of Heinrich Heine: Three Hundred and Twenty-five Poems (1917) Selected and translated by Louis Untermeyer, p. 134

„I owe my conversion simply to the reading of a book.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Religion and Philosophy in Germany, A fragment https://archive.org/stream/religionandphilo011616mbp#page/n5/mode/2up, p. 14-15
Context: In my latest book, "Komancero," I have explained the transformation that took place within me regarding sacred things. Since its publication many inquiries have been made, with zealous importunity, as to the manner in which the true light dawned upon me. Pious souls, thirsting after a miracle, have desired to know whether, like Saul on the way to Damascus, I had seen a light from heaven; or whether, like Balaam, the son of Beor, I was riding on a restive ass, that suddenly opened its mouth and began to speak as a man? No; ye credulous believers, I never journeyed to Damascus, nor do I know anything about it, save that lately the Jews there were accused of devouring aged monks of St. Francis; and I might never have known even the name of the city had I not read the Song of Solomon, wherein the wise king compares the nose of his beloved to a tower that looketh towards Damascus. Nor have I ever seen an ass, at least any four-footed one, that spake as a man, though I have often enough met men who, whenever they opened their mouths, spake as asses.
In truth, it was neither a vision, nor a seraphic revelation, nor a voice from heaven, nor any strange dream or other mystery that brought me into the way of salvation; and I owe my conversion simply to the reading of a book. A book? Yes, and it is an old, homely-looking book, modest as nature and natural as it; a book that has a work-a-day and unassuming look, like the sun that warms us, like the bread that nourishes us; a book that seems to us as familiar and as full of kindly blessing as the old grandmother who reads daily in it with dear, trembling lips, and with spectacles on her nose. And this book is called quite shortly the Book, the Bible. Rightly do men also call it the Holy Scripture; for he that has lost his God can find Him again in this Book, and towards him that has never known God it sends forth the breath of the Divine Word. The Jews, who appreciate the value of precious things, knew right well what they did when, at the burning of the second temple, they left to their fate the gold and silver implements of sacrifice, the candlesticks and lamps, even the breastplate of the High Priest adorned with great jewels, but saved the Bible. This was the real treasure of the Temple, and, thanks be to God!

„Ordinarily he is insane, but he has lucid moments when he is only stupid.“

—  Heinrich Heine

Of Savoye, appointed ambassador to Frankfurt by Lamartine (1848); as quoted in Insults : A Practical Anthology of Scathing Remarks and Acid Portraits (1941) by Max John Herzberg, p. 74

„There are more fools in the world than there are people.“

—  Heinrich Heine

As quoted in One Big Fib : The Incredible Story of the Fraudulent First International Bank of Grenada (2003) by Owen Platt, p. 37

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Similar authors

Samuel Taylor Coleridge photo
Samuel Taylor Coleridge220
English poet, literary critic and philosopher
Walt Whitman photo
Walt Whitman181
American poet, essayist and journalist
Alphonse Karr photo
Alphonse Karr3
French critic, journalist, and novelist
Léon Bloy photo
Léon Bloy22
French writer, poet and essayist
Friedrich Nietzsche photo
Friedrich Nietzsche649
German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and cl…
Matthew Arnold photo
Matthew Arnold166
English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector…
Edgar Allan Poe photo
Edgar Allan Poe124
American author, poet, editor and literary critic
Theodor Mommsen photo
Theodor Mommsen65
German classical scholar, historian, jurist, journalist, po…
Charles Baudelaire photo
Charles Baudelaire133
French poet
Karl Marx photo
Karl Marx282
German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and …
Today anniversaries
Frank Zappa photo
Frank Zappa129
American musician, songwriter, composer, and record and fil… 1940 - 1993
Hannah Arendt photo
Hannah Arendt85
Jewish-American political theorist 1906 - 1975
Rainer Maria Rilke photo
Rainer Maria Rilke175
Austrian poet and writer 1875 - 1926
Nick Vujicic photo
Nick Vujicic3
Serbian Australian evangelist and motivational speaker 1982
Another 71 today anniversaries
Similar authors
Samuel Taylor Coleridge photo
Samuel Taylor Coleridge220
English poet, literary critic and philosopher
Walt Whitman photo
Walt Whitman181
American poet, essayist and journalist
Alphonse Karr photo
Alphonse Karr3
French critic, journalist, and novelist
Léon Bloy photo
Léon Bloy22
French writer, poet and essayist
Friedrich Nietzsche photo
Friedrich Nietzsche649
German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and cl…