Henry Wadsworth Longfellow quotes

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Birthdate: 27. February 1807
Date of death: 24. March 1882
Other names: Longfello Genri Uodsuort, Генри Уодсворт Лонгфелло

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy and was one of the Fireside Poets from New England.

Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, which was then still part of Massachusetts. He studied at Bowdoin College and became a professor at Bowdoin and later at Harvard College after spending time in Europe. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night and Ballads and Other Poems . He retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, and he lived the remainder of his life in the Revolutionary War headquarters of George Washington in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His first wife Mary Potter died in 1835 after a miscarriage. His second wife Frances Appleton died in 1861 after sustaining burns when her dress caught fire. After her death, Longfellow had difficulty writing poetry for a time and focused on translating works from foreign languages. He died in 1882.

Longfellow wrote many lyric poems known for their musicality and often presenting stories of mythology and legend. He became the most popular American poet of his day and also had success overseas. He has been criticized by some, however, for imitating European styles and writing specifically for the masses.

Works

Tales of a Wayside Inn
Tales of a Wayside Inn
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Song of Hiawatha
The Song of Hiawatha
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Courtship of Miles Standish
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie
Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Building of the Ship
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
A Psalm of Life
A Psalm of Life
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Resignation
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Hyperion
Hyperion
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Builders
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Village Blacksmith
The Village Blacksmith
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Voices of the Night
Voices of the Night
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Singers
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Santa Filomena
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Light of Stars
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Arrow and the Song
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Vittoria Colonna
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Seaside and the Fireside
The Seaside and the Fireside
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Reaper and the Flowers
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Old Clock on the Stairs
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Excelsior
Excelsior
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Bridge
The Bridge
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Kavanagh
Kavanagh
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Children's Hour
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Rainy Day
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Ballads and Other Poems
Ballads and Other Poems
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Flowers
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Outre-Mer
Outre-Mer
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Quotes Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

„For after all, the best thing one can do when it is raining is let it rain.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Variant: The best thing one can do when it's raining is to let it rain.

„Every man has his secret sorrows which the world knows not; and often times we call a man cold when he is only sad.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Hyperion http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/5436, Bk. III, Ch. IV (1839).
Variant: Believe me, every heart has its secret sorrows, which the world knows not, and oftentimes we call a man cold, when he is only sad.
Context: "Ah! this beautiful world!" said Flemming, with a smile. "Indeed, I know not what to think of it. Sometimes it is all gladness and sunshine, and Heaven itself lies not far off. And then it changes suddenly; and is dark and sorrowful, and clouds shut out the sky. In the lives of the saddest of us, there are bright days like this, when we feel as if we could take the great world in our arms and kiss it. Then come the gloomy hours, when the fire will neither burn on our hearths nor in our hearts; and all without and within is dismal, cold, and dark. Believe me, every heart has its secret sorrows, which the world knows not, and oftentimes we call a man cold, when he is only sad."

„Love makes its record in deeper colors as we grow out of childhood into manhood“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Table-Talk (1857)
Context: Love makes its record in deeper colors as we grow out of childhood into manhood; as the Emperors signed their names in green ink when under age, but when of age, in purple.

„Great is the art of beginning, but greater the art is of ending“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Elegiac Verse, st. 14 (1879).
Context: Great is the art of beginning, but greater the art is of ending;
Many a poem is marred by a superfluous verse.

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„And death, and time shall disappear,—
Forever there, but never here!“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Old Clock on the Stairs

The Old Clock on the Stairs, st. 9 (1845).
Context: Never here, forever there,
Where all parting, pain, and care,
And death, and time shall disappear,—
Forever there, but never here!
The horologe of Eternity
Sayeth this incessantly,—
"Forever — never!
Never — forever!"

„This divine madness enters more or less into all our noblest undertakings.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Here Longfellow is translating or paraphrasing an expression attributed to a canon of Seville, also quoted as "we shall have a church so great and of such a kind that those who see it built will think we were mad".
Table-Talk (1857)
Context: "Let us build such a church, that those who come after us shall take us for madmen," said the old canon of Seville, when the great cathedral was planned. Perhaps through every mind passes some such thought, when it first entertains the design of a great and seemingly impossible action, the end of which it dimly foresees. This divine madness enters more or less into all our noblest undertakings.

„Round about what is, lies a whole mysterious world of might be, — a psychological romance of possibilities and things that do not happen.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Table-Talk (1857)
Context: Round about what is, lies a whole mysterious world of might be, — a psychological romance of possibilities and things that do not happen. By going out a few minutes sooner or later, by stopping to speak with a friend at a corner, by meeting this man or that, or by turning down this street instead of the other, we may let slip some great occasion of good, or avoid some impending evil, by which the whole current of our lives would have been changed. There is no possible solution to the dark enigma but the one word, "Providence".

„The Laws of Nature are just, but terrible. There is no weak mercy in them. Cause and consequence are inseparable and inevitable.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Table-Talk (1857)
Context: The Laws of Nature are just, but terrible. There is no weak mercy in them. Cause and consequence are inseparable and inevitable. The elements have no forbearance. The fire burns, the water drowns, the air consumes, the earth buries. And perhaps it would be well for our race if the punishment of crimes against the Laws of Man were as inevitable as the punishment of crimes against the Laws of Nature, — were Man as unerring in his judgments as Nature.

„I like that ancient Saxon phrase, which calls
The burial-ground God's-Acre!“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

God's-Acre, st. 1 (1842).
Context: I like that ancient Saxon phrase, which calls
The burial-ground God's-Acre! It is just;
It consecrates each grave within its walls,
And breathes a benison o'er the sleeping dust.

„All nature, he holds, is a respiration
Of the Spirit of God, who, in breathing hereafter
Will inhale it into his bosom again,
So that nothing but God alone will remain.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Golden Legend, Pt. VI, A travelling Scholastic affixing his Theses to the gate of the College.
Context: I think I have proved, by profound researches,
The error of all those doctrines so vicious
Of the old Areopagite Dyonisius,
That are making such terrible work in the churches,
By Michael the Stammerer sent from the East,
And done into Latin by that Scottish beast,
Erigena Johannes, who dares to maintain,
In the face of the truth, the error infernal,
That the universe is and must be eternal;
At first laying down, as a fact fundamental,
That nothing with God can be accidental;
Then asserting that God before the creation
Could not have existed, because it is plain
That, had he existed, he would have created;
Which is begging the question that should be debated,
And moveth me less to anger than laughter.
All nature, he holds, is a respiration
Of the Spirit of God, who, in breathing hereafter
Will inhale it into his bosom again,
So that nothing but God alone will remain.

„Turn, turn, my wheel! All things must change
To something new, to something strange“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Kéramos http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/lit/poetry/TheCompletePoeticalWorksofHenryWadsworthLongfellow/chap22.html, st. 3 (1878).
Context: Turn, turn, my wheel! All things must change
To something new, to something strange;
Nothing that is can pause or stay;
The moon will wax, the moon will wane,
The mist and cloud will turn to rain,
The rain to mist and cloud again,
To-morrow be to-day.

„Ah, how wonderful is the advent of spring!“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Source: Kavanagh: A Tale (1849), Chapter 13.
Context: Ah, how wonderful is the advent of spring! — the great annual miracle of the blossoming of Aaron's rod, repeated on myriads and myriads of branches! — the gentle progression and growth of herbs, flowers, trees, — gentle and yet irrepressible, — which no force can stay, no violence restrain, like love, that wins its way and cannot be withstood by any human power, because itself is divine power. If spring came but once in a century, instead of once a year, or burst forth with the sound of an earthquake, and not in silence, what wonder and expectation there would be in all hearts to behold the miraculous change! But now the silent succession suggests nothing but necessity. To most men only the cessation of the miracle would be miraculous and the perpetual exercise of God's power seems less wonderful than its withdrawal would be.

„The warriors that fought for their country, and bled,
Have sunk to their rest“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

"The Battle of Lovell's Pond," poem first published in the Portland Gazette (November 17, 1820).
Context: p>The warriors that fought for their country, and bled,
Have sunk to their rest; the damp earth is their bed;
No stone tells the place where their ashes repose,
Nor points out the spot from the graves of their foes.They died in their glory, surrounded by fame,
And Victory's loud trump their death did proclaim;
They are dead; but they live in each Patriot's breast,
And their names are engraven on honor's bright crest.</p

„They are dead; but they live in each Patriot's breast,
And their names are engraven on honor's bright crest.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

"The Battle of Lovell's Pond," poem first published in the Portland Gazette (November 17, 1820).
Context: p>The warriors that fought for their country, and bled,
Have sunk to their rest; the damp earth is their bed;
No stone tells the place where their ashes repose,
Nor points out the spot from the graves of their foes.They died in their glory, surrounded by fame,
And Victory's loud trump their death did proclaim;
They are dead; but they live in each Patriot's breast,
And their names are engraven on honor's bright crest.</p

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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