„What though the field be lost?
All is not Lost; the unconquerable will,
And study of revenge, immortal hate,
And the courage never to submit or yeild.“

—  John Milton, livre Le Paradis perdu

Variante: All is not lost, the unconquerable will, and study of revenge, immortal hate, and the courage never to submit or yield.
Source: Paradise Lost

Dernière mise à jour 3 juin 2021. L'histoire
John Milton photo
John Milton5
poète, essayiste et pamphlétaire anglais 1608 - 1674

Citations similaires

Nigel Cumberland photo

„If graduates do not get relevant experience in their field of study after graduation, they will forget what they learned and, in a few years, their knowledge may be completely lost“

—  Nigel Cumberland British author and leadership coach 1967

Quoted in Hong Kong's Career Times newspaper (February 6th 2004) http://www.ctgoodjobs.hk/english/article/show_article.asp?category_id=1070&article_id=12825&title=is-hong-kong-investing-enough-in-its-future&listby=date&listby_id=&page=4
Miscellaneous Quotes in the Press (2002-Present)

Julio Cortázar photo

„Nothing is lost if one has the courage to proclaim that all is lost and we must begin anew.“

—  Julio Cortázar, livre Marelle

Nada está perdido si se tiene el valor de proclamar que todo está perdido y hay que empezar de nuevo.
Source: Rayuela (Hopscotch) (1963), Chapter 71.

„Poor Hayduke: won all his arguments but lost his immortal soul.“

—  Edward Abbey, livre The Monkey Wrench Gang

The Monkey Wrench Gang (1975)

Rainer Maria Rilke photo
Thomas Middleton photo

„There is no hate lost between us.“

—  Thomas Middleton, The Witch

The Witch (1616), Act iv. Sc. 3. Compare: "There is no love lost between us", Cervantes, Don Quixote, book iv. chap. xxiii.; Oliver Goldsmith, She Stoops to Conquer (1771), Act iv.; David Garrick, Correspondence, 1759; Henry Fielding, The Grub Street Opera, act i. sc. 4.

Vanna Bonta photo

„I hated you because you reminded me of…how I once was…of what I lost.“

—  Vanna Bonta, livre Flight: A Quantum Fiction Novel

Flight: A Quantum Fiction Novel (1995)

Robert G. Ingersoll photo

„They abhor the courage of manly men. They hate the man who thinks. They long for revenge. They warm their hands at the imaginary fires of hell.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

The Truth (1896)
Contexte: They put a monster—a master—a tyrant in the sky, and seek to enslave their fellow-men. They teach the cringing virtues of serfs. They abhor the courage of manly men. They hate the man who thinks. They long for revenge. They warm their hands at the imaginary fires of hell. I show them that hell does not exist and they denounce me for destroying their consolation.

William Faulkner photo
George S. Patton photo
Harlan Ellison photo

„I feel that my responsibility is to drag the human race along with me — that I will never pander to, or speak down to, or play the safe game. Because my immortal soul will be lost.“

—  Harlan Ellison American writer 1934 - 2018

As quoted in Contemporary Authors New Revision Series: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Current Writers in Fiction, General Non-Fiction, Poetry, Journalism, Drama, Motion Pictures, Television, & Other Fields (1982) by Ann Evory
Contexte: I talk about the things people have always talked about in stories: pain, hate, truth, courage, destiny, friendship, responsibility, growing old, growing up, falling in love, all of these things. What I try to write about are the darkest things in the soul, the mortal dreads. I try to go into those places in me that contain the cauldrous. I want to dip up the fire, and I want to put it on paper. The closer I get to the burning core of my being, the things which are most painful to me, the better is my work. … It is a love/hate relationship I have with the human race. I am an elitist, and I feel that my responsibility is to drag the human race along with me — that I will never pander to, or speak down to, or play the safe game. Because my immortal soul will be lost.

Eugene O'Neill photo

„They have lost the ideal of the Land of the Free. Freedom demands initiative, courage, the need to decide what life must mean to oneself. To them, that is terror.“

—  Eugene O'Neill American playwright, and Nobel laureate in Literature 1888 - 1953

John: Act 3, Scene 2.
Days Without End (1933)
Contexte: I listen to people talking about this universal breakdown we are in and I marvel at their stupid cowardice. It is so obvious that they deliberately cheat themselves because their fear of change won't let them face the truth. They don't want to understand what has happened to them. All they want is to start the merry-go-round of blind greed all over again. They no longer know what they want this country to be, what they want it to become, where they want it to go. It has lost all meaning for them except as pig-wallow. And so their lives as citizens have no beginnings, no ends. They have lost the ideal of the Land of the Free. Freedom demands initiative, courage, the need to decide what life must mean to oneself. To them, that is terror. They explain away their spiritual cowardice by whining that the time for individualism is past, when it is their courage to possess their own souls which is dead — and stinking! No, they don't want to be free. Slavery means security — of a kind, the only kind they have courage for. It means they need not to think. They have only to obey orders from owners who are, in turn, their slaves!

Jack Kerouac photo
Robert Greene (dramatist) photo

„Ah Franion, treason is loved of many, but the Traitor hated of all: unjust offences may for a time escape without danger, but never without revenge.“

—  Robert Greene (dramatist), livre Pandosto

Pandosto (1588); p. 9 http://books.google.com/books?id=5FIPAAAAQAAJ&q="Treason+is+loved+of+many+but+the+traitor+hated+of+all"&pg=PA9#v=onepage.
Compare: "Cæsar said he loved the treason, but hated the traitor", Plutarch, Life of Romulus.
Compare: "This principle is old, but true as fate,—
Kings may love treason, but the traitor hate." Thomas Dekker, The Honest Whore (1604).

Natalie Merchant photo
Elie Wiesel photo

„I had anger but never hate. Before the war, I was too busy studying to hate. After the war, I thought, What's the use? To hate would be to reduce myself.“

—  Elie Wiesel writer, professor, political activist, Nobel Laureate, and Holocaust survivor 1928 - 2016

Interview in O : The Oprah Magazine (November 2000)

Sidonius Apollinaris photo

„Death may overwhelm them, but not fear; unconquerable they stand their ground, and their courage well-nigh outlives their lives.“
Mors obruit illos,<br/>non timor; invicti perstant animoque supersunt<br/>jam prope post animam.

—  Sidonius Apollinaris, livre Carmina

Mors obruit illos,
non timor; invicti perstant animoque supersunt
jam prope post animam.
Carmen 5, line 251; vol. 1 p. 83.
Carmina

Eric Hoffer photo

„Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life.“

—  Eric Hoffer, livre The True Believer

The True Believer (1951), Part Three: United Action and Self-Sacrifice
Contexte: It is easier to hate an enemy with much good in him than one who is all bad. We cannot hate those we despise. The Japanese had an advantage over us in that they admired us more than we admired them. They could hate us more fervently than we could hate them. The Americans are poor haters in international affairs because of their innate feeling of superiority over all foreigners. An American's hatred for a fellow American (for Hoover or Roosevelt) is far more virulent than any antipathy he can work up against foreigners. It is of interest that the backward South shows more xenophobia than the rest of the country. Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life. <!-- p. 96

Anaïs Nin photo
Frantz Fanon photo
Elizabeth Barrett Browning photo

Avec