Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington cytaty

Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington Fotografia
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Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

Data urodzenia: 1. Maj 1769
Data zgonu: 14. Wrzesień 1852
Natępne imiona: Arthur Wellesley, I duca di Wellington, Duca di Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington KG, GCB, GCH – brytyjski arystokrata, wojskowy i polityk.

Pochodził ze zubożałej anglo-irlandzkiej rodziny szlacheckiej, która zmieniła nazwisko z Wesley na Wellesley. Był trzecim synem Garreta Wesleya, który nosił tytuł pierwszego hrabiego Mornington. W latach 1781–1785 młody Wellesley pobierał nauki w Eton, a później, z powodu słabych wyników w Eton, w sławnej wojskowej akademii francuskiej w Angers.

Największą sławę zdobył w okresie wojen napoleońskich, przede wszystkim jako zwycięzca – wspólnie z Blücherem – pod Waterloo . Wcześniej z powodzeniem walczył z wojskami francuskimi w Hiszpanii i Portugalii oraz reprezentował Wielką Brytanię na kongresie wiedeńskim. Jeden z przywódców torysów, w latach 1828–1830 i przejściowo w 1834 r. pełnił funkcję premiera. Od 1847 r. był członkiem Royal Society.

Cytaty Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

„Bez niego nie zwyciężylibyśmy.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

o generale Johnie Moore – słowa z 1809 dotyczące jego udziału w bitwie pod La Coruñą.
Źródło: Nigel Cawthorne, Dowódcy i generałowie. Prawdziwe historie, Grupa Wydawnicza Foksal, Warszawa 2014, s. 108

„Są przecież najbardziej diabelskim kamieniem zawieszonym u szyi rządu, jaki można sobie wyobrazić.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

o Jerzym IV i Wilhelmie IV.
Źródło: Grzegorz Jaszuński, Ostatni monarchowie, wyd. Czytelnik, Warszawa 1975, s. 21.

„Chciałbym nadejścia Prusaków lub nocy.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

cytat przypisywany, wypowiedziany ponoć, gdy oddziały brytyjskie zostały zdziesiątkowane w trakcie bitwy pod Waterloo; w języku angielskim zdanie to jest najczęściej cytowane w formie „Podaruj mi noc albo ześlij mi Blüchera” (Give me the night or give me Blücher!).
Źródło: Helge Hesse, W 80 powiedzeń dookoła świata, tłum. Anna Wziątek, Wydawnictwo Dolnośląskie, Wrocław 2009, ISBN 9788324587339, s. 199.

„Mięso armatnie i tyle.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

Anne Hill Wellesley, lady Mornington (matka Arthura Wellesleya)
O Arthurze Wellesleyu
Źródło: Paul Johnson, Bohaterowie, tłum. Anna i Jacek Maziarscy, wyd. Świat Książki, Warszawa 2009, s. 249.

„Najbardziej niepewne zwycięstwo, jakie kiedykolwiek widziałem.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

o bitwie pod Waterloo.
Źródło: Helge Hesse, W 80 powiedzeń dookoła świata, op. cit., s. 199.

„Uwierzcie mi, nie ma rzeczy straszniejszej od wygranej bitwy z wyjątkiem bitwy przegranej.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won. (ang.)
po bitwie pod Waterloo w 1815.
Źródło: Edward Shepherd Creasy, Decisive Battles of the World, 1899, tłum. cyt. za: historia-powszechna.pl http://www.historia-powszechna.yoyo.pl/cytaty/n.php?n=1353

„It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Remark to Thomas Creevey (18 June 1815), using the word nice in an older sense of "uncertain, delicately balanced", about the Battle of Waterloo. Creevy, a civilian, got a public interview with Wellington at headquarters, and quoted the remark in his book Creevey Papers (1903), in Ch. X, on p. 236; the phrase "a damned nice thing" has sometimes been paraphrased as "a damn close-run thing."
Kontekst: It has been a damned serious business... Blucher and I have lost 30,000 men. It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life. … By God! I don't think it would have been done if I had not been there.

„The history of a battle, is not unlike the history of a ball. Some individuals may recollect all the little events of which the great result is the battle won or lost, but no individual can recollect the order in which, or the exact moment at which, they occurred, which makes all the difference as to their value or importance...“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Letter to John Croker (8 August 1815), as quoted in The History of England from the Accession of James II (1848) by Thomas Babington Macaulay, Volume I Chapter 5 http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/hst/european/TheHistoryofEnglandfromtheAccessionofJamesIIVol1/chap5.html, p. 180.; and in The Waterloo Letters (1891) edited by H. T. Sibome

„Napoleon has humbugged me, by God“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

At the Duchess of Richmond's ball (15 June 1815), as quoted in Camps, Quarters, and Casual Places http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/9460 (1896) by Archibald Forbes, quotes Captain Bowles account and citing the Letters of the First Earl of Malmesbury.
Kontekst: Napoleon has humbugged me, by God; he has gained twenty-four hours' march on me.

„Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won: the bravery of my troops hitherto saved me from the greater evil; but to win such a battle as this of Waterloo, at the expens of so many gallant friends, could only be termed a heavy misfortune but for the result to the public.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Letter from the field of Waterloo (June 1815), as quoted in Decisive Battles of the World (1899) by Edward Shepherd Creasy. Quoted too in Memorable Battles in English History: Where Fought, why Fought, and Their Results; with the Military Lives of the Commanders by William Henry Davenport Adams; Editor Griffith and Farran, 1863. p. 400.
Kontekst: My heart is broken by the terrible loss I have sustained in my old friends and companions and my poor soldiers. Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won: the bravery of my troops hitherto saved me from the greater evil; but to win such a battle as this of Waterloo, at the expens of so many gallant friends, could only be termed a heavy misfortune but for the result to the public.

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„It has been a damned serious business“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Remark to Thomas Creevey (18 June 1815), using the word nice in an older sense of "uncertain, delicately balanced", about the Battle of Waterloo. Creevy, a civilian, got a public interview with Wellington at headquarters, and quoted the remark in his book Creevey Papers (1903), in Ch. X, on p. 236; the phrase "a damned nice thing" has sometimes been paraphrased as "a damn close-run thing."
Kontekst: It has been a damned serious business... Blucher and I have lost 30,000 men. It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life. … By God! I don't think it would have been done if I had not been there.

„I don't know what effect these men will have on the enemy, but by God, they terrify me.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Said to be his remarks on a draft of new troops sent to him in Spain (1809), as quoted in A New Dictionary of Quotations on Historical Principles from Ancient and Modern Sources (1942) by H. L. Mencken, this quote is disputed, and may be derived from a comment made to Colonel Robert Torrens about some of his generals in a despatch (29 August 1810): "As Lord Chesterfield said of the generals of his day, "I only hope that when the enemy reads the list of their names, he trembles as I do."
Disputed

„If a gentleman happens to be born in a stable, it does not follow that he should be called a horse.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

As quoted in Genetic Studies in Joyce (1995) by David Hayman and Sam Slote. Though such remarks have often been quoted as Wellington's response on being called Irish, the earliest published sources yet found for similar comments are those about him attributed to an Irish politician:
The poor old Duke! what shall I say of him? To be sure he was born in Ireland, but being born in a stable does not make a man a horse.
Daniel O'Connell, in a speech (16 October 1843), as quoted in Shaw's Authenticated Report of the Irish State Trials (1844), p. 93 http://books.google.com/books?id=dpKbWonMghwC&pg=PA93&dq=%22+make+a+man+a+horse%22&num=100&ei=0YVZSIWXCIiSjgG37bGIDA
No, he is not an Irishman. He was born in Ireland; but being born in a stable does not make a man a horse.
Daniel O'Connell during a speech (16 October 1843), as quoted in Reports of State Trials: New Series Volume V, 1843 to 1844 (1893) "The Queen Against O'Connell and Others", p. 206 http://books.google.com/books?id=zWETAAAAYAAJ&pg=PT108&dq=%22+make+a+man+a+horse%22&num=100&ei=MohZSJ-PK4a4jgG-lLGJDA
Variants: If a man be born in a stable, that does not make him a horse.
Quoted as as an anonymous proverb in Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern English and Foreign Sources (1899), p. 171
Because a man is born in a stable that does not make him a horse.
Quoted as a dubious statement perhaps made early in his career in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs (1992) edited by John Simpson and Jennifer Speake, p. 162.
Misattributed

„I used to say of him that his presence on the field made the difference of forty thousand men.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

On Napoleon Bonaparte, in notes for 2 November 1831; later, in the notes for 18 September 1836, he is quoted as saying:
It is very true that I have said that I considered Napoleon's presence in the field equal to forty thousand men in the balance. This is a very loose way of talking; but the idea is a very different one from that of his presence at a battle being equal to a reinforcement of forty thousand men.

„All the business of war, and indeed all the business of life, is to endeavour to find out what you don't know by what you do; that's what I called "guessing what was at the other side of the hill."“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Statement in conversation with John Croker https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilson_Croker and Croker's wife (4 September 1852), as quoted in The Croker Papers: The Correspondence and Diaries of the Late Right Honourable John Wilson Croker, LL.Dm F.R.S, Secretary of the Admiralty from 1809 to 1830 (1884), edited by Louis J. Jennings, Vol.III, p. 276.

„There is no mistake; there has been no mistake; and there shall be no mistake.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

In response to William Huskisson declaring there had been a mistake, and he had not intended to resign, after Wellington chose to interpret a letter to him detailing his obligation to vote for a measure opposed by him as a letter of resignation. As quoted in The Military and Political Life of Arthur Wellesley: Duke of Wellington (1852) by "A Citizen of the World", and in Wellingtoniana (1852), edited by John Timbs.

„The French system of conscription brings together a fair sample of all classes; ours is composed of the scum of the earth — the mere scum of the earth. It is only wonderful that we should be able to make so much out of them afterwards.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Speaking about soldiers in the British Army, 4 November 1813
A French army is composed very differently from ours. The conscription calls out a share of every class — no matter whether your son or my son — all must march; but our friends — I may say it in this room — are the very scum of the earth. People talk of their enlisting from their fine military feeling — all stuff — no such thing. Some of our men enlist from having got bastard children — some for minor offences — many more for drink; but you can hardly conceive such a set brought together, and it really is wonderful that we should have made them the fine fellows they are.
Notes for 11 November 1831.

„I should have given more praise.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

As quoted in A History of Warfare (1968) by Bernard Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein: "Sir Winston Churchill once told me of a reply made by the Duke of Wellington, in his last years, when a friend asked him: "If you had your life over again, is there any way in which you could have done better?" The old Duke replied: "Yes, I should have given more praise."

„If you believe that you will believe anything.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

In reply to a man who greeted him in the street with the words "Mr. Jones, I believe?", as quoted in Wellington — The Years of the Sword (1969) by Elizabeth Longford.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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