Georg Simmel quotes

Georg Simmel photo
27   1

Georg Simmel

Birthdate: 1. March 1858
Date of death: 26. September 1918
Other names: جورج سيمل, George Simmel

Georg Simmel was a German sociologist, philosopher, and critic.

Simmel was one of the first generation of German sociologists: his neo-Kantian approach laid the foundations for sociological antipositivism, asking 'What is society?' in a direct allusion to Kant's question 'What is nature?', presenting pioneering analyses of social individuality and fragmentation. For Simmel, culture referred to "the cultivation of individuals through the agency of external forms which have been objectified in the course of history". Simmel discussed social and cultural phenomena in terms of "forms" and "contents" with a transient relationship; form becoming content, and vice versa, dependent on the context. In this sense he was a forerunner to structuralist styles of reasoning in the social sciences. With his work on the metropolis, Simmel was a precursor of urban sociology, symbolic interactionism and social network analysis.An acquaintance of Max Weber, Simmel wrote on the topic of personal character in a manner reminiscent of the sociological 'ideal type'. He broadly rejected academic standards, however, philosophically covering topics such as emotion and romantic love. Both Simmel and Weber's nonpositivist theory would inform the eclectic critical theory of the Frankfurt School.Simmel's most famous works today are The Problems of the Philosophy of History , The Philosophy of Money , The Metropolis and Mental Life , Soziologie , and Fundamental Questions of Sociology . He also wrote extensively on the philosophy of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, as well on art, most notably his book Rembrandt: An Essay in the Philosophy of Art . Wikipedia

Photo: Unknown author / Public domain

Works

The Stranger
Georg Simmel

„That man overcomes himself means that he reaches out beyond the bounds that the moment sets for him. There must be something at hand to be overcome, but it is only there in order to be overcome. Thus even as an ethical agent, man is the limited being that has no limit.“

—  Georg Simmel

Source: The View of Life (1918), p. 5-6 part of the first essay "Life as Transcendence"
Context: Man is something that is to be overcome.
Logically considered, this, too, presents a contradiction: he who overcomes himself is admittedly the victor, but he is also the defeated. The ego succumbs to itself, when it wins; it achieves victory, when it suffers defeat. Yet the contradiction only arises when the two aspects of this unity are hardened into opposed, mutually exclusive conceptions. It is precisely the fully unified process of the moral life which overcomes and surpasses every lower state by achieving a higher one, and again transcends this latter state through one still higher. That man overcomes himself means that he reaches out beyond the bounds that the moment sets for him. There must be something at hand to be overcome, but it is only there in order to be overcome. Thus even as an ethical agent, man is the limited being that has no limit.

„Man is something that is to be overcome“

—  Georg Simmel

Source: The View of Life (1918), p. 5-6 part of the first essay "Life as Transcendence"
Context: Man is something that is to be overcome.
Logically considered, this, too, presents a contradiction: he who overcomes himself is admittedly the victor, but he is also the defeated. The ego succumbs to itself, when it wins; it achieves victory, when it suffers defeat. Yet the contradiction only arises when the two aspects of this unity are hardened into opposed, mutually exclusive conceptions. It is precisely the fully unified process of the moral life which overcomes and surpasses every lower state by achieving a higher one, and again transcends this latter state through one still higher. That man overcomes himself means that he reaches out beyond the bounds that the moment sets for him. There must be something at hand to be overcome, but it is only there in order to be overcome. Thus even as an ethical agent, man is the limited being that has no limit.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„The deepest problems of modern life derive from the claim of the individual to preserve the autonomy and individuality of his existence in the face of overwhelming social forces, of historical heritage, of external culture, and of the technique of life. The fight with nature which primitive man has to wage for his bodily existence attains in this modern form its latest transformation. The eighteenth century called upon man to free himself of all the historical bonds in the state and in religion, in morals and in economics. Man’s nature, originally good and common to all, should develop unhampered. In addition to more liberty, the nineteenth century demanded the functional specialization of man and his work; this specialization makes one individual incomparable to another, and each of them indispensable to the highest possible extent. However, this specialization makes each man the more directly dependent upon the supplementary activities of all others. Nietzsche sees the full development of the individual conditioned by the most ruthless struggle of individuals; socialism believes in the suppression of all competition for the same reason. Be that as it may, in all these positions the same basic motive is at work: the person resists to being leveled down and worn out by a social technological mechanism. An inquiry into the inner meaning of specifically modern life and its products, into the soul of the cultural body, so to speak, must seek to solve the equation which structures like the metropolis set up between the individual and the super-individual contents of life. Such an inquiry must answer the question of how the personality accommodates itself in the adjustments to external forces.“

—  Georg Simmel

Source: The Metropolis and Modern Life (1903), p. 409

„The Stranger is close to us, insofar as we feel between him and ourselves common features of a national, social, occupational, or generally human, nature. He is far from us, insofar as these common features extend beyond him or us, and connect us only because they connect a great many people.“

—  Georg Simmel, book The Stranger

Der Fremde ist uns nah, insofern wir Gleichheiten nationaler oder sozialer, berufsmäßiger oder allgemein menschlicher Art zwischen ihm und uns fühlen; er ist uns fern, insofern diese Gleichheiten über ihn und uns hinausreichen und uns beide nur verbinden, weil sie überhaupt sehr Viele verbinden.
Source: The Stranger (1908), p. 405

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Similar authors

Karl Marx photo
Karl Marx279
German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and …
Ludwig Feuerbach photo
Ludwig Feuerbach36
German philosopher and anthropologist
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel photo
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel105
German philosopher
Arthur Schopenhauer photo
Arthur Schopenhauer260
German philosopher
Friedrich Nietzsche photo
Friedrich Nietzsche648
German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and cl…
Heinrich Heine photo
Heinrich Heine60
German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic
Samuel Taylor Coleridge photo
Samuel Taylor Coleridge219
English poet, literary critic and philosopher
Friedrich Engels photo
Friedrich Engels85
German social scientist, author, political theorist, and ph…
Henri-Frédéric Amiel photo
Henri-Frédéric Amiel50
Swiss philosopher and poet
Émile Durkheim photo
Émile Durkheim43
French sociologist (1858-1917)
Today anniversaries
James Baldwin photo
James Baldwin162
(1924-1987) writer from the United States 1924 - 1987
Horace Mann photo
Horace Mann67
American politician 1796 - 1859
Raymond Carver photo
Raymond Carver51
American short story author and poet 1938 - 1988
William S. Burroughs photo
William S. Burroughs108
American novelist, short story writer, essayist, painter, a… 1914 - 1997
Another 50 today anniversaries
Similar authors
Karl Marx photo
Karl Marx279
German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and …
Ludwig Feuerbach photo
Ludwig Feuerbach36
German philosopher and anthropologist
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel photo
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel105
German philosopher
Arthur Schopenhauer photo
Arthur Schopenhauer260
German philosopher
Friedrich Nietzsche photo
Friedrich Nietzsche648
German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and cl…