Quotes from work
The Meaning of the Russian Revolution

The Meaning of the Russian Revolution

"The Meaning of the Russian Revolution" from Leo Tolstoy. Russian writer (1828-1910).


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„Not only does the action of Governments not deter men from crimes; on the contrary, it increases crime by always disturbing and lowering the moral standard of society.“

—  Leo Tolstoy, The Meaning of the Russian Revolution

The Meaning of the Russian Revolution (1906), a work about the 1905 Russian Revolution.
Context: Not only does the action of Governments not deter men from crimes; on the contrary, it increases crime by always disturbing and lowering the moral standard of society. Nor can this be otherwise, since always and everywhere a Government, by its very nature, must put in the place of the highest, eternal, religious law (not written in books but in the hearts of men, and binding on every one) its own unjust, man-made laws, the object of which is neither justice nor the common good of all but various considerations of home and foreign expediency.

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