„Perhaps, somewhere, some day, at a less miserable time, we may see each other again.“

Source: Lolita

Last update Jan. 23, 2022. History
Vladimir Nabokov photo
Vladimir Nabokov193
Russian-American novelist, lepidopterist, professor 1899 - 1977

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Emil M. Cioran photo
Francis Place photo

„It may be supposed that I led a miserable life but I did not I was very far indeed from being miserable at this time when my wife came home at night, we had always something to talk about, we were pleased to see each other, our reliance on each other was great indeed, we were poor, but we were young, active cheerful and although my wife at times doubted that we would get on in the world, I had no such misgivings.“

—  Francis Place English social reformer 1771 - 1854

Source: The Autobiography of Francis Place: 1771-1854, 1972, p. 7; Cited in: Jeremy Wickins. " An Overview of Francis Place's Life, 1771-1854 http://www.historyhome.co.uk/people/place2.htm," historyhome.co.uk, last edited 12 january 2016.

Stephen King photo
Common (rapper) photo

„Granted we known each other for some time
but it don't take a whole day to recognize sunshine“

—  Common (rapper) American rapper, actor and author from Illinois 1972

"The Light" (Track 7)
Albums, Like Water for Chocolate (2000)

Leo Tolstoy photo
Chuck Palahniuk photo
Dave Eggers photo

„We are all feeding from each other, all the time, every day.“

—  Dave Eggers, book A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

Source: A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

Bram van Velde photo

„Yes, perhaps there is some enjoyment in it [his paintings] too, somewhere.“

—  Bram van Velde Dutch painter 1895 - 1981

short quotes, 13 April 1968; p. 70
1960's, Conversations with Samuel Beckett and Bram van Velde' (1965 - 1969)

„Tomorrow'll be a new day. Which is really the same miserable fucking day all over again.“

—  Tim Winton Australian writer 1960

Part I, Ch.2 - p.9 [Page numbers per the Picador 2018 UK paperback.]
The Shepherd's Hut (2018)

Emil M. Cioran photo

„You really should come to the house — one of these days we might die without having seen each other again.“

—  Emil M. Cioran Romanian philosopher and essayist 1911 - 1995

"Since we have to die in any case, what's the use of seeing each other again?"
Drawn and Quartered (1983)

„It may be expedient but it is not just that some should have less in order that others may prosper.“

—  John Rawls, book A Theory of Justice

Source: A Theory of Justice (1971; 1975; 1999), Chapter I, Section 3, pg. 15

John Dewey photo
Chester Bowles photo
Anne Brontë photo

„I see that a man cannot give himself up to drinking without being miserable one half his days and mad the other“

—  Anne Brontë, book The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

Source: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (1848), Ch. XXII : Traits of Friendship; Arthur to Helen
Context: I see that a man cannot give himself up to drinking without being miserable one half his days and mad the other; besides, I like to enjoy my life at all sides and ends, which cannot be done by one that suffers himself to be the slave of a single propensity.

Larry Wall photo

„It is my job in life to travel all roads, so that some may take the road less travelled, and others the road more travelled, and all have a pleasant day.“

—  Larry Wall American computer programmer and author, creator of Perl 1954

[199709241628.JAA08908@wall.org, 1997]
Usenet postings, 1997

Adrienne Rich photo

„I touch you knowing we weren't born tomorrow,
and somehow, each of us will help the other live,
and somewhere, each of us must help the other die.“

—  Adrienne Rich American poet, essayist and feminist 1929 - 2012

Source: Twenty One Love Poems

William Golding photo

„Words may, through the devotion, the skill, the passion, and the luck of writers prove to be the most powerful thing in the world. They may move men to speak to each other because some of those words somewhere express not just what the writer is thinking but what a huge segment of the world is thinking.“

—  William Golding British novelist, poet, playwright and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate 1911 - 1993

Nobel prize lecture (1983)
Context: Words may, through the devotion, the skill, the passion, and the luck of writers prove to be the most powerful thing in the world. They may move men to speak to each other because some of those words somewhere express not just what the writer is thinking but what a huge segment of the world is thinking. They may allow man to speak to man, the man in the street to speak to his fellow until a ripple becomes a tide running through every nation — of commonsense, of simple healthy caution, a tide that rulers and negotiators cannot ignore so that nation does truly speak unto nation. Then there is hope that we may learn to be temperate, provident, taking no more from nature's treasury than is our due. It may be by books, stories, poetry, lectures we who have the ear of mankind can move man a little nearer the perilous safety of a warless and provident world. It cannot be done by the mechanical constructs of overt propaganda. I cannot do it myself, cannot now create stories which would help to make man aware of what he is doing; but there are others who can, many others. There always have been. We need more humanity, more care, more love. There are those who expect a political system to produce that; and others who expect the love to produce the system. My own faith is that the truth of the future lies between the two and we shall behave humanly and a bit humanely, stumbling along, haphazardly generous and gallant, foolishly and meanly wise until the rape of our planet is seen to be the preposterous folly that it is.
For we are a marvel of creation. I think in particular of one of the most extraordinary women, dead now these five hundred years, Juliana of Norwich. She was caught up in the spirit and shown a thing that might lie in the palm of her hand and in the bigness of a nut. She was told it was the world. She was told of the strange and wonderful and awful things that would happen there. At the last, a voice told her that all things should be well and all manner of things should be well and all things should be very well.
Now we, if not in the spirit, have been caught up to see our earth, our mother, Gaia Mater, set like a jewel in space. We have no excuse now for supposing her riches inexhaustible nor the area we have to live on limitless because unbounded. We are the children of that great blue white jewel. Through our mother we are part of the solar system and part through that of the whole universe. In the blazing poetry of the fact we are children of the stars.

Jane Austen photo
James Branch Cabell photo

„I can but entreat you to remember it is only by preserving faith in human dreams that we may, after all, perhaps some day make them come true.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest

"Richard Fentnor Harroby" in Ch. 1 : Pallation of the Gambit
The Cream of the Jest (1917)
Context: I also begin where he began, and follow wither the dream led him. Meanwhile, I can but entreat you to remember it is only by preserving faith in human dreams that we may, after all, perhaps some day make them come true.

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