„Nothing has meaning except for the meaning you give it.“

Source: Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Last update June 3, 2021. History
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T. Harv Eker11
American writer 1954

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„Life has no meaning a priori … It is up to you to give it a meaning, and value is nothing but the meaning that you choose.“

—  Jean Paul Sartre French existentialist philosopher, playwright, novelist, screenwriter, political activist, biographer, and literary cri… 1905 - 1980

Source: Existentialism Is a Humanism (1946), p. 58

Erich Fromm photo

„There is no meaning to life except the meaning man gives his life by the unfolding of his powers.“

—  Erich Fromm German social psychologist and psychoanalyst 1900 - 1980

Source: Man for Himself: An Inquiry into the Psychology of Ethics

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„Apologies mean nothing if you don't mean it.“

—  Laurie Halse Anderson American children's writer 1961

Source: The Impossible Knife of Memory

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„There is no hurry. Time means nothing
to you.“

—  Charles Bukowski American writer 1920 - 1994

Source: The Roominghouse Madrigals: Early Selected Poems, 1946-1966

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„The meaning of life is to give life meaning.“

—  Viktor E. Frankl Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, and Holocaust survivor 1905 - 1997

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„You mean nothing to no one but that's nobody's fault.“

—  Conor Oberst American musician 1980

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Robert E. Lee photo

„The Abolitionist… must see that he has neither the right or power of operating except by moral means and suasion.“

—  Robert E. Lee Confederate general in the Civil War 1807 - 1870

Speech in the Senate (3 March 1854); Quoted in Douglas Southall Freeman (2008) Lee, p. 93
1850s

Lewis Carroll photo

„Why it's simply impassible!
Alice: Why, don't you mean impossible?
Door: No, I do mean impassible. Nothing's impossible!“

—  Lewis Carroll English writer, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer 1832 - 1898

Source: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

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„The Government which has a right to do an act and has imposed on it the duty of performing that act must, according to the dictates of reason, be allowed to select the means, and those who contend that it may not select any appropriate means that one particular mode of effecting the object is excepted take upon themselves the burden of establishing that exception.“

—  John Marshall fourth Chief Justice of the United States 1755 - 1835

17 U.S. (4 Wheaton) 316, 409-411
McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)
Context: [T]he power of creating a corporation is one appertaining to sovereignty, and is not expressly conferred on Congress. This is true. But all legislative powers appertain to sovereignty. The original power of giving the law on any subject whatever is a sovereign power, and if the Government of the Union is restrained from creating a corporation as a means for performing its functions, on the single reason that the creation of a corporation is an act of sovereignty, if the sufficiency of this reason be acknowledged, there would be some difficulty in sustaining the authority of Congress to pass other laws for the accomplishment of the same objects. The Government which has a right to do an act and has imposed on it the duty of performing that act must, according to the dictates of reason, be allowed to select the means, and those who contend that it may not select any appropriate means that one particular mode of effecting the object is excepted take upon themselves the burden of establishing that exception. [... ] The power of creating a corporation, though appertaining to sovereignty, is not, like the power of making war or levying taxes or of regulating commerce, a great substantive and independent power which cannot be implied as incidental to other powers or used as a means of executing them. It is never the end for which other powers are exercised, but a means by which other objects are accomplished. No contributions are made to charity for the sake of an incorporation, but a corporation is created to administer the charity; no seminary of learning is instituted in order to be incorporated, but the corporate character is conferred to subserve the purposes of education. No city was ever built with the sole object of being incorporated, but is incorporated as affording the best means of being well governed. The power of creating a corporation is never used for its own sake, but for the purpose of effecting something else. No sufficient reason is therefore perceived why it may not pass as incidental to those powers which are expressly given if it be a direct mode of executing them.

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