„There is no virtue in curiosity. In fact, it might be the most immoral desire a man can possess.“

Source: Confessions of a Mask (1949), p. 222.

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update June 8, 2021. History
Yukio Mishima photo
Yukio Mishima60
Japanese author 1925 - 1970

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„I hope I shall always possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain (what I consider the most enviable of all titles) the character of an honest man“

—  George Washington first President of the United States 1732 - 1799

Letter to Alexander Hamilton (28 August 1788) http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/04-06-02-0432
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Context: I hope I shall always possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain (what I consider the most enviable of all titles) the character of an honest man, as well as prove (what I desire to be considered in reality) that I am, with great sincerity & esteem, Dear Sir Your friend and Most obedient Hble Ser⟨vt⟩

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„It is only the individual possessed of the most entire sincerity that can exist under Heaven, who can adjust the great invariable relations of mankind, establish the great fundamental virtues of humanity, and know the transforming and nurturing operations of Heaven and Earth“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 BC

The Analects, The Doctrine of the Mean
Context: It is only the individual possessed of the most entire sincerity that can exist under Heaven, who can adjust the great invariable relations of mankind, establish the great fundamental virtues of humanity, and know the transforming and nurturing operations of Heaven and Earth; — shall this individual have any being or anything beyond himself on which he depends? Call him man in his ideal, how earnest is he! Call him an abyss, how deep is he! Call him Heaven, how vast is he! Who can know him, but he who is indeed quick in apprehension, clear in discernment, of far-reaching intelligence, and all-embracing knowledge, possessing all Heavenly virtue?

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„In matters of science, curiosity gratified begets not indolence, but new desires.“

—  Stephen Baxter author 1957

Source: Ages in Chaos (2003), Chapter 15, “The world was tired out with geological theories” (p. 153)

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„Facts do not "speak for themselves." They speak for or against competing theories. Facts divorced from theory or visions are mere isolated curiosities.“

—  Thomas Sowell American economist, social theorist, political philosopher and author 1930

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„A man is free in proportion to the measure of his virtues, and the extent to which he is free determines what his virtues can accomplish.“

—  John of Salisbury, Policraticus

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„Friendship is not to be sought, not to be dreamed, not to be desired; it is to be exercised (it is a virtue).“

—  Simone Weil French philosopher, Christian mystic, and social activist 1909 - 1943

Source: Simone Weil : An Anthology (1986), Love (1947), p. 274
Context: To wish to escape from solitude is cowardice. Friendship is not to be sought, not to be dreamed, not to be desired; it is to be exercised (it is a virtue).

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„That a thing is unnatural, in any precise meaning which can be attached to the word, is no argument for its being blamable; since the most criminal actions are to a being like man not more unnatural than most of the virtues.“

—  John Stuart Mill British philosopher and political economist 1806 - 1873

Source: On Nature (1874), p. 102
Context: Conformity to nature has no connection whatever with right and wrong. The idea can never be fitly introduced into ethical discussions at all, except, occasionally and partially, into the question of degrees of culpability. To illustrate this point, let us consider the phrase by which the greatest intensity of condemnatory feeling is conveyed in connection with the idea of nature - the word "unnatural." That a thing is unnatural, in any precise meaning which can be attached to the word, is no argument for its being blamable; since the most criminal actions are to a being like man not more unnatural than most of the virtues.

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„Virtue with poverty didst thou prefer
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—  Dante Alighieri, book Purgatorio

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„A common mortal periodically selected by his fellow-citizens to watch over their own interests, can never be supposed to possess this stupendous virtue.“

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„The saving of anyone is something which is not in the power of man, but only of God. No one can be saved — in virtue of what he can do. Everyone can be saved — in virtue of what God can do.“

—  Karl Barth, book Church Dogmatics

2:2 <!-- p. 625 -->
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Context: The saving of anyone is something which is not in the power of man, but only of God. No one can be saved — in virtue of what he can do. Everyone can be saved — in virtue of what God can do. The divine claim takes the form that it puts both the obedient and the disobedient together and compels them to realise this, to recognise their common status in face of the commanding God.

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