„Sadness isn't sadness. It's happiness in a black jacket. Tears are not tears. They're balls of laughter dipped in salt. Death is not death. It's life that's jumped off a tall cliff.“

Source: Blackbird Singing: Poems and Lyrics, 1965-1999

Last update Jan. 8, 2021. History
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Paul McCartney49
English singer-songwriter and composer 1942
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