„Man is always something more than what he knows of himself. He is not what he is simply once and for all, but is a process…“

Man in the Modern Age (1933), p. 146

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Karl Jaspers Fotografia
Karl Jaspers5
niemiecki psychiatra i filozof 1883 - 1969

Podobne cytaty

Rudolf Nureyev Fotografia

„It is always thought that he gave more than what he received, but to give something, you must have something inside.“

—  Rudolf Nureyev Soviet ballet dancer and choreographer 1938 - 1993

Źródło: Gervaso, Roberto. La mosca al naso, Rizzoli Editore (1980)

William Least Heat-Moon Fotografia

„Other than to amuse himself, why should a man pretend to know where he's going or understand what he sees?“

—  William Least Heat-Moon, książka Blue Highways

Part Five, Chapter 6.
Blue Highways (1982)

Golo Mann Fotografia

„Man is always more than he can know of himself; consequently, his accomplishments, time and again, will come as a surprise to him.“

—  Golo Mann German historian 1909 - 1994

Golo Mann in his Recollections, quoted in: Marcel Reich-Ranicki (1989), Thomas Mann and his family, p. 187.

Philip K. Dick Fotografia
Jean Paul Sartre Fotografia
Herbert Beerbohm Tree Fotografia

„A man never knows what a fool he is until he hears himself imitated by one.“

—  Herbert Beerbohm Tree English actor and theatre manager 1852 - 1917

Quoted by Max Beerbohm in Hebert Beerbohm Tree: Some Memories of Him and of His Art Collected by Max Beerbohm http://books.google.com/books?id=wM08AAAAIAAJ&q="A+man+never+knows+what+a+fool+he+is+until+he+hears+himself+imitated+by+one"&pg=PA312#v=onepage (1920).

Edgar Wallace Fotografia

„What is a highbrow? He is a man who has found something more interesting than women.“

—  Edgar Wallace British crime writer, journalist and playwright 1875 - 1932

New York Times, 24 January 1932, sec.8, p. 6

Jean Paul Sartre Fotografia
Andrei Tarkovsky Fotografia
Confucius Fotografia

„There is nothing more visible than what is secret, and nothing more manifest than what is minute. Therefore the superior man is watchful over himself, when he is alone.“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 p. n. e.

Źródło: The Doctrine of the Mean

Cyrano de Bergerac Fotografia

„To believe something, one must imagine that it is more probable than not. Unless you show him what is probable or he realizes it himself, he may tell you that he believes and yet he will not believe.“

—  Cyrano de Bergerac French novelist, dramatist, scientist and duelist 1619 - 1655

Sun-being to the court
The Other World (1657)
Kontekst: O just ones, hear me! You cannot condemn this man, monkey or parrot for saying that the moon is the world he comes from. If he is a man, all men are free. Is he then not free to imagine what he wants, even if he does not come from the moon? Can you force him to have only your visions? Impossible! You may make him say that he believes that the moon is not a world, but still he will not believe it. To believe something, one must imagine that it is more probable than not. Unless you show him what is probable or he realizes it himself, he may tell you that he believes and yet he will not believe.

Victor Hugo Fotografia

„A one-eyed man is much more incomplete than a blind man, for he knows what it is that's lacking.“

—  Victor Hugo, książka Katedra Marii Panny w Paryżu

Źródło: The Hunchback of Notre-Dame

R. G. Collingwood Fotografia

„Lastly, what is history for? This is perhaps a harder question than the others; a man who answers it will have to reflect rather more widely than a man who answers the three we have answered already. He must reflect not only on historical thinking but on other things as well, because to say that something is `for' something implies a distinction between A and B, where A is good for something and B is that for which something is good. But I will suggest an answer, and express the opinion that no historian would reject it, although the further questions to which it gives rise are numerous and difficult.
My answer is that history is `for' human self-knowledge. It is generally thought to be of importance to man that he should know himself: where knowing himself means knowing not his merely personal peculiarities, the things that distinguish him from other men, but his nature as man. Knowing yourself means knowing, first, what it is to be a man; secondly, knowing what it is to be the kind of man you are; and thirdly, knowing what it is to be the man you are and nobody else is. Knowing yourself means knowing what you can do; and since nobody knows what he can do until he tries, the only clue to what man can do is what man has done. The value of history, then, is that it teaches us what man has done and thus what man is.“

—  R. G. Collingwood British historian and philosopher 1889 - 1943

Źródło: The Idea of History (1946), p. 10

Adam Smith Fotografia
Michael Swanwick Fotografia

„What the common man calls Evil, he once told me, is nothing more than the fear of one’s own potential.“

—  Michael Swanwick, książka Jack Faust

Źródło: Jack Faust (1997), Chapter 16, “The Wild Hunt” (p. 278)

„What I am saying is that it is not so much what man is that counts as it is what he ventures to make of himself. To make the leap he must do more than disclose himself; he must risk a certain amount of confusion. Then, as soon as he does catch a glimpse of a different kind of life, he needs to find some way of overcoming the paralyzing moment of threat, for this is the instant when he wonders who he really is - whether he is what he just was or is what he is about to be. Adam must have experienced such a moment.“

—  George Kelly (psychologist) American psychologist and therapist 1905 - 1967

Wariant: What I am saying is that it is not so much what man is that counts as it is what he ventures to make of himself. To make the leap he must do more than disclose himself; he must risk a certain amount of confusion. Then, as soon as he does catch a glimpse of a different kind of life, he needs to find some way of overcoming the paralyzing moment of threat, for this is the instant when he wonders who he really is - whether he is what he just was or is what he is about to be. Adam must have experienced such a moment.
Źródło: The Language of Hypothesis, 1964, p. 158

Alexander Graham Bell Fotografia

„A man, as a general rule, owes very little to what he is born with — a man is what he makes of himself.“

—  Alexander Graham Bell scientist and inventor known for his work on the telephone 1847 - 1922

Bell Telephone Talk (1901)

Arthur Schopenhauer Fotografia
Thomas Mann Fotografia

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