„By the time you swear you're his,
Shivering and sighing.
And he vows his passion is,
Infinite, undying.
Lady make note of this --
One of you is lying.“

Ostatnia aktualizacja 8 stycznia 2020. Historia
Dorothy Parker Fotografia
Dorothy Parker6
amerykańska pisarka i poetka 1893 - 1967

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„Everard sighed, switched off his conscience, and began lying.“

—  Poul Anderson American science fiction and fantasy writer 1926 - 2001

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E. L. James Fotografia

„I vowed I would bring you solace in time of need. Please don't make me break my vows.“

—  E. L. James, książka Fifty Shades Freed

Anastasia Steele, Chapter 4, p. 75.
Fifty Shades Freed (2011)

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Albert Camus Fotografia

„You have already grasped that Sisyphus is the absurd hero. He is, as much through his passions as through his torture.“

—  Albert Camus, książka The Myth of Sisyphus

The Myth of Sisyphus (1942), The Myth of Sisyphus
Kontekst: You have already grasped that Sisyphus is the absurd hero. He is, as much through his passions as through his torture. His scorn of the gods, his hatred of death, and his passion for life won him that unspeakable penalty in which the whole being is exerted toward accomplishing nothing. This is the price that must be paid for the passions of this earth. Nothing is told us about Sisyphus in the underworld. Myths are made for the imagination to breathe life into them.

Halldór Laxness Fotografia

„Sighing, he became aware of his own insignificance in the midst of this infinite chorus glory and radiance; his whole consciousness dissolved into one sacred, tearful yearning to be allowed to be one with the Highest and be no longer any part of himself. He lay for a long time on the sand or on the grass, and wept tears of deep and fervent happiness, face to face with the inexpressible. "God, God, God!" he cried, trembling with love and reverence, and kissed the ground and dug his fingers into the turf.“

—  Halldór Laxness Icelandic author 1902 - 1998

Heimsljós (World Light) (1940), Book One: The Revelation of the Deity
Kontekst: He was not quite nine years old, in fact, when he began to have spiritual experiences... he felt he saw God's image open before him. He felt the deity reveal itself in Nature in an inexpressible music, the sonic revelation of the deity; and before he knew it, he himself had become a trembling voice in a celestial chorus of glory. His soul seemed to be rising out of his body like frothing milk brimming over the edge of a basin; it was as if his soul were flowing into an unfathomable ocean of higher life, beyond words, beyond all perception, his body suffused by some surging light that was beyond all light. Sighing, he became aware of his own insignificance in the midst of this infinite chorus glory and radiance; his whole consciousness dissolved into one sacred, tearful yearning to be allowed to be one with the Highest and be no longer any part of himself. He lay for a long time on the sand or on the grass, and wept tears of deep and fervent happiness, face to face with the inexpressible. "God, God, God!" he cried, trembling with love and reverence, and kissed the ground and dug his fingers into the turf.

Harry Truman Fotografia

„He’s one of the few in the history of this country to run for high office talking out of both sides of his mouth at the same time and lying out of both sides.“

—  Harry Truman American politician, 33rd president of the United States (in office from 1945 to 1953) 1884 - 1972

On Richard Nixon, as quoted Plain Speaking : An Oral Biography of Harry S Truman (1974) by Merle Miller, p. 179

George Bird Evans Fotografia
Hartley Coleridge Fotografia

„Then would he swear
That he would conquer time; that in his reign
It never should be winter; he would have
No pain, no growing old, no death at all.“

—  Hartley Coleridge British poet, biographer, essayist, and teacher 1796 - 1849

Sylphs
Poems (1851), Prometheus
Kontekst: The glad sons of the deliver'd earth
Shall yearly raise their multitudinous voice,
Hymning great Jove, the God of Liberty!
Then he grew proud, yet gentle in his pride,
And full of tears, which well became his youth,
As showers do spring. For he was quickly moved,
And joy'd to hear sad stories that we told
Of what we saw on earth, of death and woe,
And all the waste of time. Then would he swear
That he would conquer time; that in his reign
It never should be winter; he would have
No pain, no growing old, no death at all.
And that the pretty damsels, whom we said
He must not love, for they would die and leave him,
Should evermore be young and beautiful;
Or, if they must go, they should come again,
Like as the flowers did. Thus he used to prate,
Till we almost believed him.

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„no one talks more passionately about his rights than he who in the depths of his soul doubts whether he has any“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, książka Human, All Too Human

I.597
Human, All Too Human (1878)
Kontekst: No one talks more passionately about his rights than he who in the depths of his soul doubts whether he has any. By enlisting passion on his side he wants to stifle his reason and its doubts: thus he will acquire a good conscience and with it success among his fellow men.

Harry Truman Fotografia
William Kingdon Clifford Fotografia

„In the first case he is lying, and his moral character is to blame; in the second case he is ignorant or mistaken, and it is only his knowledge or his judgment which is in fault.“

—  William Kingdon Clifford English mathematician and philosopher 1845 - 1879

The Ethics of Belief (1877), The Weight Of Authority
Kontekst: In what cases, then, let us ask in the first place, is the testimony of a man unworthy of belief? He may say that which is untrue either knowingly or unknowingly. In the first case he is lying, and his moral character is to blame; in the second case he is ignorant or mistaken, and it is only his knowledge or his judgment which is in fault. In order that we may have the right to accept his testimony as ground for believing what he says, we must have reasonable grounds for trusting his veracity, that he is really trying to speak the truth so far as he knows it; his knowledge, that he has had opportunities of knowing the truth about this matter; and his judgment, that he has made proper use of those opportunities in coming to the conclusion which he affirms.
However plain and obvious these reasons may be, so that no man of ordinary intelligence, reflecting upon the matter, could fail to arrive at them, it is nevertheless true that a great many persons do habitually disregard them in weighing testimony. Of the two questions, equally important to the trustworthiness of a witness, "Is he dishonest?" and "May he be mistaken?" the majority of mankind are perfectly satisfied if one can, with some show of probability, be answered in the negative. The excellent moral character of a man is alleged as ground for accepting his statements about things which he cannot possibly have known.

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