„A plant, an animal, the regular order of nature — probably also the disposition of the whole universe — give manifest evidence that they are possible only by means of and according to ideas“

—  Immanuel Kant, könyv Critique of Pure Reason

B 374
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)
Kontextus: A plant, an animal, the regular order of nature — probably also the disposition of the whole universe — give manifest evidence that they are possible only by means of and according to ideas; that, indeed, no one creature, under the individual conditions of its existence, perfectly harmonizes with the idea of the most perfect of its kind — just as little as man with the idea of humanity, which nevertheless he bears in his soul as the archetypal standard of his actions; that, notwithstanding, these ideas are in the highest sense individually, unchangeably, and completely determined, and are the original causes of things; and that the totality of connected objects in the universe is alone fully adequate to that idea.

Forrás Wikiquote. Utolsó frissítés 2021. június 3.. Történelem
Immanuel Kant fénykép
Immanuel Kant17
német idealista filozófus 1724 - 1804

Hasonló idézetek

Johann Gottlieb Fichte fénykép
Hans Arp fénykép
Stephen Hawking fénykép

„Yet all the evidence is that it evolves in a regular way according to certain laws. It would therefore seem reasonable to suppose that there are also laws governing the boundary conditions.“

—  Stephen Hawking British theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author 1942 - 2018

"The Quantum State of the Universe", Nuclear Physics (1984) <!-- B239, p. 258 -->
Kontextus: Many people would claim that the boundary conditions are not part of physics but belong to metaphysics or religion. They would claim that nature had complete freedom to start the universe off any way it wanted. That may be so, but it could also have made it evolve in a completely arbitrary and random manner. Yet all the evidence is that it evolves in a regular way according to certain laws. It would therefore seem reasonable to suppose that there are also laws governing the boundary conditions.

Johann Gottlieb Fichte fénykép
Frithjof Schuon fénykép
Albert Einstein fénykép
Irving Kristol fénykép
Henry David Thoreau fénykép

„If a plant cannot live according to its nature, it dies; and so a man.“

—  Henry David Thoreau 1817-1862 American poet, essayist, naturalist, and abolitionist 1817 - 1862

Forrás: Civil Disobedience and Other Essays

Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet fénykép

„Circumstantial evidence only raises a probability.“

—  Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet British lawyer and Tory politician 1783 - 1870

Reg. v. Rowton (1865), 13 W. R. 437.

Ray Comfort fénykép
Herbert Marcuse fénykép
Vitruvius fénykép
John Hall fénykép

„Give according to your means, or God will make your means according to your giving.“

—  John Hall Presbyterian pastor from Northern Ireland in New York, died 1898 1829 - 1898

Reported in Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), p. 194.

David Hume fénykép
John Dewey fénykép
Miguel de Unamuno fénykép
Zeno of Citium fénykép

„The end may be defined as life in accordance with nature or, in other words, in accordance with our own human nature as well as that of the universe.“

—  Zeno of Citium ancient Greek philosopher -334 - -263 i.e.

As quoted by Diogenes Laërtius, in Lives of Eminent Philosophers: 'Zeno', 7.87.
The "end" here means “the goal of life.”

Bernhard Riemann fénykép

„Natural science is the attempt to comprehend nature by precise concepts.
According to the concepts by which we comprehend nature not only are observations completed at every instant but also future observations are pre-determined as necessary, or, in so far as the concept-system is not quite adequate therefor, they are predetermined as probable; these concepts determine what is "possible" (accordingly also what is "necessary," or the opposite of which is impossible), and the degree of the possibility (the "probability") of every separate event that is possible according to them, can be mathematically determined, if the event is sufficiently precise.
If what is necessary or probable according to these concepts occurs, then the latter are thereby confirmed and upon this confirmation by experience rests our confidence in them. If, however, something happens which according to them is not expected and which is therefore according to them impossible or improbable, then arises the problem so to complete them, or if necessary, to transform them, that according to the completed or ameliorated concept-system, what is observed ceases to be impossible or improbable. The completion or amelioration of the concept-system forms the "explanation" of the unexpected observation. By this process our comprehension of nature becomes gradually always more complete and assured, but at the same time recedes even farther behind the surface of phenomena.“

—  Bernhard Riemann German mathematician 1826 - 1866

Theory of Knowledge
Gesammelte Mathematische Werke (1876)

Luther Burbank fénykép
J. Howard Moore fénykép

„The inanimate universe is related to the animate as means to end.“

—  J. Howard Moore 1862 - 1916

We conscious individuals manipulate it in manners best adapted to the satisfaction of our desires. We barricade its rivers, plow its seas, ingulf its vegetations, enslave its atmospheres, torture its soils, and perform upon it any other surgery or enormity that will help us in the satisfaction of these driving desires of ours. The inanimate is. if reason is not treason, the gigantic accessory of the consciousnesses that infest it. The animate environment, on the contrary, is related to each living being, not as means, but as end.
Forrás: Better-World Philosophy: A Sociological Synthesis (1899), The Social Problem, pp. 78–79

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