„For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.“

—  John Milton, livre Areopagitica

Source: Areopagitica

Dernière mise à jour 3 juin 2021. L'histoire
John Milton photo
John Milton5
poète, essayiste et pamphlétaire anglais 1608 - 1674

Citations similaires

John Lancaster Spalding photo

„To ask them to read books whose life-breath is pure thought and beauty is as though one asked them to read things written in a language they do not understand and have no desire to learn.“

—  John Lancaster Spalding Catholic bishop 1840 - 1916

Source: Aphorisms and Reflections (1901), pp. 11-12
Contexte: The multitude are matter-of-fact. They live in commonplace concerns and interests. Their problems are, how to get more plentiful and better food and drink, more comfortable and beautiful clothing, more commodious dwellings, for themselves and their children. When they seek relaxation from their labors for material things, they gossip of the daily happenings, or they play games or dance or go to the theatre or club, or they travel or they read story books, or accounts in the newspapers of elections, murders, peculations, marriages, divorces, failures and successes in business; or they simply sit in a kind of lethargy. They fall asleep and awake to tread again the beaten path. While such is their life, it is not possible that they should take interest or find pleasure in religion, poetry, philosophy, or art. To ask them to read books whose life-breath is pure thought and beauty is as though one asked them to read things written in a language they do not understand and have no desire to learn. A taste for the best books, as a taste for whatever is best, is acquired; and it can be acquired only by long study and practice. It is a result of free and disinterested self-activity, of efforts to attain what rarely brings other reward than the consciousness of having loved and striven for the best. But the many have little appreciation of what does not flatter or soothe the senses. Their world, like the world of children and animals, is good enough for them; meat and drink, dance and song, are worth more, in their eyes, than all the thoughts of all the literatures. A love tale is better than a great poem, and the story of a bandit makes Plutarch seem tiresome. This is what they think and feel, and what, so long as they remain what they are, they will continue to think and feel. We do not urge a child to read Plato—why should we find fault with the many for not loving the best books?

Thomas Carlyle photo

„A good book is the purest essence of a human soul.“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

Shahrukh Khan photo
James Hamilton photo
Lois McMaster Bujold photo

„The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.“

—  Lois McMaster Bujold, livre Diplomatic Immunity

Source: Vorkosigan Saga, Diplomatic Immunity (2002)

Robert Greene photo
Diadochos of Photiki photo
Julian (emperor) photo

„The one absolutely, the Intelligible, the ever Preexisting, comprehending all the universe together within the One — nay, more, is not the whole world One living thing — all and everywhere full of life and soul, perfect and made up out of parts likewise perfect?“

—  Julian (emperor) Roman Emperor, philosopher and writer 331 - 363

Upon the Sovereign Sun (362)
Contexte: The one absolutely, the Intelligible, the ever Preexisting, comprehending all the universe together within the One — nay, more, is not the whole world One living thing — all and everywhere full of life and soul, perfect and made up out of parts likewise perfect? Now of this double unity the most perfect part (I mean of the Unity in the Intelligible World that comprehends all things in One, and of the Unity encompassing the Sensible World, that brings together all things into a single and perfect nature) is the perfection of the sovereign Sun, which is central and single, and placed in the middle of the intermediate Powers. <!-- But coming after this, there exists a certain connection in the Intelligible World with the Power that orders and arranges all things in one. Does not the essence of the Fifth Body, which is turned, as it were by a lathe, in a circle, move around the heavens, and is that which holds together all the parts, and binds them to one another, uniting what is naturally united amongst them and also those parts that mutually affect each other. These two essences, which are the causes of mutual attraction and of union (whereof the one manifests itself in the Intelligible, the other in the Sensible creation) does the Sun thus concentrate into one. Of the former he imitates this power of embracing and containing all things in the Intelligible creation, inasmuch as he proceeds from that source; whilst he governs the latter, that which is perceptible in the world of Sense. Perhaps, therefore, the self-existent principle, which existed first in the Intelligible creation, and lastly in the Visible bodies of the heavens, is owner of the intermediate, self-created essence of the sovereign Sun, from which primal creative essence there descends upon the visible world the radiance which illuminates the universe.

John Godfrey Saxe photo
Robert Musil photo

„We do not have too much intellect and too little soul, but too little intellect in matters of the soul.“

—  Robert Musil Austrian writer 1880 - 1942

Wir haben nicht zuviel Verstand und zu wenig Seele, sondern wir haben zu wenig Verstand in den Fragen der Seele.
Helpless Europe (1922)

John Locke photo

„Of all the ways whereby children are to be instructed, and their manners formed, the plainest, easiest, and most efficacious, is, to set before their eyes the examples of those things you would have them do, or avoid“

—  John Locke, livre Some Thoughts Concerning Education

Sec. 82
Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693)
Contexte: Of all the ways whereby children are to be instructed, and their manners formed, the plainest, easiest, and most efficacious, is, to set before their eyes the examples of those things you would have them do, or avoid; which, when they are pointed out to them, in the practice of persons within their knowledge, with some reflections on their beauty and unbecomingness, are of more force to draw or deter their imitation, than any discourses which can be made to them.

John Muir photo
Laurence Sterne photo

„Digressions, incontestably, are the sunshine; —& they are the life, the soul of reading; — take them out of this book for instance, — you might as well take the book along with them.“

—  Laurence Sterne, livre Vie et opinions de Tristram Shandy

Book I, Ch. 22.
The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760-1767)

John Napier photo

„5 Proposition. The space of the fift trumpet or vial containeth 245. years, and so much also, every one of the rest of the trumpets or vials doe containe.“

—  John Napier Scottish mathematician 1550 - 1617

A Plaine Discovery of the Whole Revelation of St. John (1593), The First and Introductory Treatise

Dorothy Day photo

„The best thing to do with the best things in life is to give them up.“

—  Dorothy Day Social activist 1897 - 1980

Interviewed in Time (29 December 1975)

„Animals that are killed for their flesh lead miserable lives. They are kept in disgusting conditions. The simplest little thing you can do not to hurt animals is just not eat them. I'm bringing my four children up vegetarian, and I know absolutely that I'm giving them the very best start in life.“

—  Sadie Frost English actress and producer 1965

“Sadie Frost: Vegetarian Testimonial for PETA”, video ad for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (14 October 2011) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTkXMQSJOpI.

Eduardo Galeano photo
Epictetus photo

„Crows pick out the eyes of the dead, when the dead have no longer need of them; but flatterers mar the soul of the living, and her eyes they blind.“

—  Epictetus philosopher from Ancient Greece 50 - 138

Fragment iv.
Golden Sayings of Epictetus, Fragments

Yann Martel photo

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