„Yet malice never was his aim;
He lashed the vice but spared the name.
No individual could resent,
Where thousands equally were meant.“

—  Jonathan Swift, Context: Yet malice never was his aim; He lashed the vice but spared the name. No individual could resent, Where thousands equally were meant. His satire points at no defect But what all mortals may correct; For he abhorred that senseless tribe Who call it humor when they gibe. Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift (1731), l. 459
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Jonathan Swift6
écrivain, satiriste, essayiste, pamphlétaire politique angl… 1667 - 1745
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„Where, where was Roderick then!
One blast upon his bugle-horn
Were worth a thousand men.“

—  Walter Scott Scottish historical novelist, playwright, and poet 1771 - 1832
Canto VI, stanza 18.

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„[The] truth is incontrovertible. Panic may resent it, ignorance may deride it, malice may distort it, but there it is.“

—  Winston S. Churchill Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1874 - 1965
Speech in the House of Commons, May 17, 1916 "Royal Assent" http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1916/may/17/royal-assent#column_1578.

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„Yet no one could apparently be more unlike those who were especially named as the French philosophers of the eighteenth century. He remained reverential; he was never blasphemous, never blatant; he was careful to avoid giving needless pain or arousing fruitless discussion; and, while the tendency of his whole thinking was evidently removing him from the orthodoxy of the Church, his was a broader and deeper philosophy than that which was then dominant.“

—  Andrew Dickson White American politician 1832 - 1918
Context: The French philosophy of the eighteenth century was in full strength. Those were the years in which Voltaire ruled European opinion, and Turgot could not but take account of his influence. Yet no one could apparently be more unlike those who were especially named as the French philosophers of the eighteenth century. He remained reverential; he was never blasphemous, never blatant; he was careful to avoid giving needless pain or arousing fruitless discussion; and, while the tendency of his whole thinking was evidently removing him from the orthodoxy of the Church, his was a broader and deeper philosophy than that which was then dominant. p. 167

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