„The art of war is of vital importance to the State.“

—  Sun Tzu, livre L'Art de la guerre

The Art of War, Chapter I · Detail Assessment and Planning
Original: (zh_Hant) 孫子曰:國之上下,死生之地,存亡之道,不可不察也。
Contexte: The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.

Sun Tzu photo
Sun Tzu6
philosophe théoricien de l'art de la guerre chinois -543 - -495 avant J.-C.

Citations similaires

Sun Tzu photo

„The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.“

—  Sun Tzu, livre L'Art de la guerre

(zh-TW) 孫子曰:國之上下,死生之地,存亡之道,不可不察也。
The Art of War, Chapter 1 · Detail Assessment and Planning

Raymond Chandler photo

„South Koreans do not consider the integrity of their state important enough to go to war for.“

—  Brian Reynolds Myers American professor of international studies 1963

2010s, Interview with Chad O'Carroll (2012)

Marshall McLuhan photo
Emil M. Cioran photo
Cy Twombly photo

„For myself the past is the source (for all art is vitally contemporary).“

—  Cy Twombly American painter 1928 - 2011

1950 - 1960
Source: 'Editions du Regard', January 1952, p.13; as quoted in 'A monograph', M. Whittall, London,Thames & Hudson, 2005ns du Regard. p. 9

Tarik Gunersel photo

„If life were enough for vitality, there would be no art.“

—  Tarik Gunersel Turkish actor 1953

Oluşmak (To Become) Aphorisms (Pan Publishing House, Istanbul, 2011)

Henry Moore photo
Samuel P. Huntington photo

„The most important groupings of states are no longer the three blocs of the Cold War but rather the world’s seven or eight major civilizations.“

—  Samuel P. Huntington American political scientist 1927 - 2008

Source: The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (1996), Ch. 1: The New Era in World Politics, § 2 : A Multipolar, Multicivilizational World
Contexte: In the post-Cold War world, for the first time in history, global politics has become multipolar and multicivilizational. During most of human existence, contacts between civilizations were intermittent or nonexistent. Then, with the beginning of the modern era, about A. D. 1500, global politics assumed two dimensions. For over four hundred years, the nation states of the West — Britain, France, Spain, Austria, Prussia, Germany, the United States, and others — constituted a multipolar international system within Western civilization and interacted, competed, and fought wars with each other. At the same time, Western nations also expanded, conquered, colonized, or decisively influenced every other civilization. During the Cold War global politics became bipolar and the world was divided into three parts. A group of mostly wealthy and democratic societies, led by the United States, was engaged in a pervasive ideological, political, economic, and, at times, military competition with a group of somewhat poorer communist societies associated with and led by the Soviet Union. Much of this conflict occurred in the Third World outside these two camps, composed of countries which often were poor, lacked political stability, were recently independent, and claimed to be nonaligned.
In the late 1980s the communist world collapsed, and the Cold War international system became history. In the post-Cold War world, the most important distinctions among peoples are not ideological, political, or economic. They are cultural. Peoples and nations are attempting to answer the most basic question humans can face: Who are we? And they are answering that question in the traditional way human beings have answered it, by reference to the things that mean most to them. People define themselves in terms of ancestry, religion, language, history, values, customs, and institutions. They identify with cultural groups: tribes, ethnic groups, religious communities, nations, and, at the broadest level, civilizations. People use politics not just to advance their interests but also to define their identity. We know who we are only when we know who we are not and often only when we know whom we are against.
Nation states remain the principal actors in world affairs. Their behavior is shaped as in the past by the pursuit of power and wealth, but it is also shaped by cultural preferences, commonalities, and differences. The most important groupings of states are no longer the three blocs of the Cold War but rather the world’s seven or eight major civilizations. Non-Western societies, particularly in East Asia, are developing their economic wealth and creating the basis for enhanced military power and political influence. As their power and self-confidence increase, non-Western societies increasingly assert their own cultural values and reject those “imposed” on them by the West.

Marshall McLuhan photo

„Bless advertising art for its pictorial vitality and verbal creativity.“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicatio… 1911 - 1980

Source: 1960s, Counterblast (1969), p. 18

James Baldwin photo

„Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important.“

—  James Baldwin (1924-1987) writer from the United States 1924 - 1987

"An interview with James Baldwin" (1961)
Contexte: You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discover that it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that he is alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important.

Vladimir Nabokov photo
Herbert Read photo

„The work of art … is an instrument for tilling the human psyche, that it may continue to yield a harvest of vital beauty.“

—  Herbert Read English anarchist, poet, and critic of literature and art 1893 - 1968

Source: Collected Poems (1966), p. 20

John Ruskin photo

„The entire vitality of art depends upon its being either full of truth, or full of use“

—  John Ruskin English writer and art critic 1819 - 1900

Lecture IV
Lectures on Art (1870)
Contexte: The entire vitality of art depends upon its being either full of truth, or full of use; and that, however pleasant, wonderful, or impressive it may be in itself, it must yet be of inferior kind, and tend to deeper inferiority, unless it has clearly one of these main objects, — either to state a true thing, or to adorn a serviceable one.

Kurt Cobain photo
William Carlos Williams photo

„Such war, as the arts live and breathe by, is continuous.“

—  William Carlos Williams American poet 1883 - 1963

Introduction
The Wedge (1944)
Contexte: There is no poetry of distinction without formal invention, for it is in the intimate form that works of art achieve their exact meaning, in which they most resemble the machine, to give language its highest dignity, its illumination in the environment to which it is native. Such war, as the arts live and breathe by, is continuous.
It may be that my interests as expressed here are pre-art. If so I look for a development along these lines and will be satisfied with nothing else.

Julie Taymor photo

„Why do we think that arts are leisure? Why isn't it arts and science or arts and the most important thing in your life?“

—  Julie Taymor American film and theatre director 1952

Bill Moyers interview (2002)
Contexte: I used to say that arts were talked about in the arts and leisure page. Now, why would it be arts and leisure? Why do we think that arts are leisure? Why isn't it arts and science or arts and the most important thing in your life? I think that art has become a big scarlet letter in our culture.
It's a big "A." And it says, you are an elitist, you're effete, or whatever those things... do you know what I mean? It means you don't connect. And I don't believe that. I think we've patronized our audiences long enough.
You can do things that would bring people to another place and still get someone on a very daily mundane moving level but you don't have to separate art from the masses.

Leo Tolstoy photo
Robert Henri photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“