Quotes from book
Man's Search for Meaning

Man's Search for Meaning
Viktor E. FranklOriginal title …trotzdem Ja zum Leben sagen: Ein Psychologe erlebt das Konzentrationslager (German, 1946)

Man's Search for Meaning is a 1946 book by Viktor Frankl chronicling his experiences as a prisoner in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, and describing his psychotherapeutic method, which involved identifying a purpose in life to feel positive about, and then immersively imagining that outcome. According to Frankl, the way a prisoner imagined the future affected his longevity. The book intends to answer the question "How was everyday life in a concentration camp reflected in the mind of the average prisoner?" Part One constitutes Frankl's analysis of his experiences in the concentration camps, while Part Two introduces his ideas of meaning and his theory called logotherapy.


Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo

„To suffer unecessarily is masochistic rather than heroic.“

—  Viktor E. Frankl, book Man's Search for Meaning

Variant: To Suffer unnecessarily is masochistic rather than heroic.
Source: Man's Search for Meaning

Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo

„You may of course ask whether we really need to refer to "saints."“

—  Viktor E. Frankl, book Man's Search for Meaning

Postscript 1984 : The Case for a Tragic Optimism, based on a lecture at the Third World Congress of Logotherapy, Regensburg University (19 June 1983)
Man's Search for Meaning (1946; 1959; 1984)
Context: You may of course ask whether we really need to refer to "saints." Wouldn't it suffice just to refer to decent people? It is true that they form a minority. More than that, they always will remain a minority. And yet I see therein the very challenge to join the minority. For the world is in a bad state, but everything will become still worse unless each of us does his best.
So, let us be alert — alert in a twofold sense:
Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of.
And since Hiroshima we know what is at stake.

Viktor E. Frankl photo

„Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of.
And since Hiroshima we know what is at stake.“

—  Viktor E. Frankl, book Man's Search for Meaning

Postscript 1984 : The Case for a Tragic Optimism, based on a lecture at the Third World Congress of Logotherapy, Regensburg University (19 June 1983)
Variant: So, let us be alert in a twofold sense: Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of. And since Hiroshima we know what is at stake.
Source: Man's Search for Meaning (1946; 1959; 1984)
Context: You may of course ask whether we really need to refer to "saints." Wouldn't it suffice just to refer to decent people? It is true that they form a minority. More than that, they always will remain a minority. And yet I see therein the very challenge to join the minority. For the world is in a bad state, but everything will become still worse unless each of us does his best.
So, let us be alert — alert in a twofold sense:
Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of.
And since Hiroshima we know what is at stake.

Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo
Viktor E. Frankl photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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