„Thanne is it wysdom, as it thynketh me,
To maken vertu of necessity,“

The Knight's Tale, lV 2177 - 2186
The Canterbury Tales
Context: p>What maketh this, but Juppiter the kyng,
That is prince and cause of alle thyng
Convertynge al unto his propre welle
From which it is deryved, sooth to telle,
And heer-agayns no creature on lyve
Of no degree availleth for to strive.Thanne is it wysdom, as it thynketh me,
To maken vertu of necessity,
And take it weel, that we may nat eschue;
And namely, that to us alle is due.</p

Last update May 22, 2020. History
Geoffrey Chaucer photo
Geoffrey Chaucer98
English poet 1343 - 1400

Related quotes

Geoffrey Chaucer photo

„To maken vertue of necessite.“

—  Geoffrey Chaucer, book The Canterbury Tales

The Knight's Tale, l. 3044
The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer photo
Vincent Van Gogh photo

„The work is an absolute necessity for me.“

—  Vincent Van Gogh Dutch post-Impressionist painter (1853-1890) 1853 - 1890

Quote in Vincent's letter to Theo van Gogh, from The Hague, 3 June 1883; as cited in Stranger on the Earth : A Psychological Biography of Vincent Van Gogh (1996) by Albert J. Lubin, p. 22
Variant translation: For me, the work is an absolute necessity. I cannot put it off; I don't care for anything else; that is to say, the pleasure in something else ceases at once, and I become melancholy when I cannot go on with my work. I feel then as the weaver does when he sees that his threads have got tangled, the pattern he had on the loom has gone to the deuce, and his exertion and deliberation are lost.
As quoted in Dear Theo: the Autobiography of Vincent Van Gogh (1995) edited by Irving Stone and Jean Stone, p. 204
1880s, 1883
Context: The work is an absolute necessity for me. I can't put it off, I don't care for anything but the work; that is to say, the pleasure in something else ceases at once and I become melancholy when I can't go on with my work. Then I feel like a weaver who sees that his threads are tangled, and the pattern he had on the loom is gone to hell, and all his thought and exertion is lost.

Thomas Jefferson photo

„Good wine is a necessity of life for me.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

As quoted in The Man from Monticello : An Intimate Life of Thomas Jefferson (1969) by Thomas J. Fleming, p. 250
Posthumous publications

Pliny the Younger photo

„Honour is to you and me as strong an obligation, as necessity to others.“

—  Pliny the Younger Roman writer 61 - 113

Letter 10, 3.
Letters, Book IV
Original: (la) Neque enim minus apud nos honestas quam apud alios necessitas valet.

Anaïs Nin photo

„Luxury is not a necessity to me, but beautiful and good things are.“

—  Anaïs Nin writer of novels, short stories, and erotica 1903 - 1977

Geoffrey Chaucer photo

„The firste vertue, sone, if thou wilt lere,
Is to restreine and kepen wel thy tonge.“

—  Geoffrey Chaucer, book The Canterbury Tales

The Manciples Tale, l. 17281
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919), Canterbury Tales

John Wycliffe photo

„Crown and cloth maken no priest, nor emperor's bishop with his words, but power that crist giveth; and thus by life have been priests known.“

—  John Wycliffe English theologian and early dissident in the Roman Catholic Church

As quoted in Typical English Churchmen (1909) by John Neville Figgis, p. 15

Henryk Sienkiewicz photo

„My position is such that there is no necessity for me to enter into competition with struggling humanity.“

—  Henryk Sienkiewicz, book Without Dogma

"Rome, 9 January"
Without Dogma (1891)
Context: My position is such that there is no necessity for me to enter into competition with struggling humanity. As to expensive and ruinous pleasures, I am a sceptic who knows how much they are worth, or rather, knows that they are not worth anything.

Erich Fromm photo

„The most important misunderstanding seems to me to lie in a confusion between the human necessities which I consider part of human nature, and the human necessities as they appear as drives, needs, passions, etc., in any given historical period.“

—  Erich Fromm German social psychologist and psychoanalyst 1900 - 1980

Human Nature and Social Theory (1969)
Context: The most important misunderstanding seems to me to lie in a confusion between the human necessities which I consider part of human nature, and the human necessities as they appear as drives, needs, passions, etc., in any given historical period. This division is not very different from Marx’s concept of "human nature in general", to be distinguished from "human nature as modified in each historical period". The same distinction exists in Marx when he distinguishes between "constant" or "fixed" drives and "relative" drives. The constant drives "exist under all circumstances and … can be changed by social conditions only as far as form and direction are concerned". The relative drives "owe their origin only to a certain type of social organization".

W. H. Auden photo

„Money is the necessity that frees us from necessity.“

—  W. H. Auden, book Forewords and Afterwords

"A Poet of the Actual", p. 266
Forewords and Afterwords (1973)
Context: Money is the necessity that frees us from necessity. Of all novelists in any country, Trollope best understands the role of money. Compared with him even Balzac is a romantic.

Geoffrey Chaucer photo

„And of your herte up-casteth the visage
To thilke God that after his image
Yow made, and thynketh al nis but a faire
This world, that passeth sone as floures faire.“

—  Geoffrey Chaucer, book Troilus and Criseyde

Book 5, line 1835-1841
Troilus and Criseyde (1380s)
Context: O yonge fresshe folkes, he or she,
In which that love up-groweth with your age,
Repeyreth hoom fro worldly vanitee,
And of your herte up-casteth the visage
To thilke God that after his image
Yow made, and thynketh al nis but a faire
This world, that passeth sone as floures faire.

Sidonius Apollinaris photo

„How dismal the necessity of birth! how miserable the necessity of living! how hard the necessity of death!“

—  Sidonius Apollinaris Gaulish poet, aristocrat and bishop 430 - 489

Lib. 8, Ep. 11, sect. 4; vol. 2, p. 463.
Epistularum
Original: (la) O neccessitas abiecta nascendi, vivendi misera dura moriendi.

Clive Staples Lewis photo
Geoffrey Chaucer photo

„Noght o word spak he more than was nede,
And that was seyd in forme and reverence,
And short and quik, and ful of hy sentence.
Souninge in moral vertu was his speche,
And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.“

—  Geoffrey Chaucer, book The Canterbury Tales

General Prologue, l. 305 - 310
Source: The Canterbury Tales
Context: Of studie took he most cure and most hede.
Noght o word spak he more than was nede,
And that was seyd in forme and reverence,
And short and quik, and ful of hy sentence.
Souninge in moral vertu was his speche,
And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.

Aldous Huxley photo

„The choice now is between militarism and pacifism. To me, the necessity of pacifism seems absolutely clear.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

Authors Take Sides on the Spanish War (1937) edited by Nancy Cunard and published by the Left Review
Context: As for 'taking sides' — the choice, it seems to me, is no longer between two users of violence, two systems of dictatorship. Violence and dictatorship cannot produce peace and liberty; they can only produce the results of violence and dictatorship, results with which history has made us only too sickeningly familiar. The choice now is between militarism and pacifism. To me, the necessity of pacifism seems absolutely clear.

Nikos Kazantzakis photo

„Someone within me is struggling to lift a great weight, to cast off the mind and flesh by overcoming habit, laziness, necessity.“

—  Nikos Kazantzakis, book The Saviors of God

The Saviors of God (1923)
Context: Someone within me is struggling to lift a great weight, to cast off the mind and flesh by overcoming habit, laziness, necessity.
I do not know from where he comes or where he goes. I clutch at his onward march in my ephemeral breast, I listen to his panting struggle, I shudder when I touch him.

Albert Einstein photo

„I do not accept a religion of fear; My God will not hold me responsible for the actions that necessity imposes.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Source: Attributed in posthumous publications, p. 89
Context: The God Spinoza revered is my God, too: I meet Him everyday in the harmonious laws which govern the universe. My religion is cosmic, and my God is too universal to concern himself with the intentions of every human being. I do not accept a religion of fear; My God will not hold me responsible for the actions that necessity imposes. My God speaks to me through laws.

Neal A. Maxwell photo
George Müller photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“