„For in order to avoid having to deal with relative values, he had long since come to deny all purpose to the phenomenon of existence — it was more expedient and comforting.“

Source: The Sheltering Sky (1949), p. 65

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update June 3, 2021. History
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Paul Bowles22
American composer, writer, translator 1910 - 1999

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