„As civilization develops, we become more preoccupied with human life, and less conscious of our relation to non-human nature. Literature reflects this, and the more advanced the civilization, the more literature seems to concern itself with purely human problems and conflicts. The gods and heroes of the old myths fade away and give place to people like ourselves.“

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 2: The Singing School

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update March 24, 2021. History
Northrop Frye photo
Northrop Frye131
Canadian literary critic and literary theorist 1912 - 1991

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—  Northrop Frye Canadian literary critic and literary theorist 1912 - 1991

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 1: The Motive For Metaphor http://northropfrye-theeducatedimagination.blogspot.ca/2009/08/1-motive-for-metaphor.html
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