„The real reason behind the advancement of science is that it questioned everything and threw away the old tendencies inerting knowledge because of unquestionable opinions“

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update Sept. 9, 2021. History
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Ali Al-Wardi39
Iraqi sociologist 1913 - 1995

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„There is no knowledge and science like pondering and thought; and there is no prosperity and advancement like knowledge and science.“

—  Ali cousin and son-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad 601 - 661

Majlisi, Bihārul Anwār, vol. 1, p. 179
Regarding Knowledge & Wisdom, General

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„Knowledge—it excites prejudices to call it science—is advancing as irresistibly, as majestically, as remorselessly as the ocean moves in upon the shore.“

—  Oliver Wendell Holmes Poet, essayist, physician 1809 - 1894

The Poet at the Breakfast Table (1872), p. 267 The Writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Vol. 3 (1892)

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„Science is empirical: knowing the answer is nothing. Testing your knowledge means everything.“

—  Lawrence M. Krauss American physicist 1954

"A Universe From Nothing" by Lawrence Krauss, AAI 2009 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ImvlS8PLIo#t=23m40s (23:40-23:48)

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„In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.“

—  Galileo Galilei Italian mathematician, physicist, philosopher and astronomer 1564 - 1642

Third letter on sunspots (December 1612) to Mark Wesler (1558 - 1614), as quoted in Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957) by Stillman Drake, p. 134 - 135; Italian text online at Liber Liber http://www.liberliber.it/biblioteca/g/galilei/lettere/html/lett08c.htm, also from IntraText http://www.intratext.com/IXT/ITA0188/_PQ.HTM.
Variant translation: In questions of science the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.
As quoted in Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859) by François Arago, as translated by Baden Powell, Robert Grant, and William Fairbairn, p. 365
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Variant: In the sciences, the authority of thousands of opinions is not worth as much as one tiny spark of reason in an individual man.
Context: for in the sciences the authority of thousands of opinions is not worth as much as one tiny spark of reason in an individual man. Besides, the modern observations deprive all former writers of any authority, since if they had seen what we see, they would have judged as we judge.

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„There is an almost universal tendency, perhaps an inborn tendency, to suspect the good faith of a man who holds opinions that differ from our own opinions.“

—  Karl Popper Austrian-British philosopher of science 1902 - 1994

"The Importance of Critical Discussion" in On the Barricades: Religion and Free Inquiry in Conflict (1989) by Robert Basil
Context: There is an almost universal tendency, perhaps an inborn tendency, to suspect the good faith of a man who holds opinions that differ from our own opinions. … It obviously endangers the freedom and the objectivity of our discussion if we attack a person instead of attacking an opinion or, more precisely, a theory.

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„The tendency is to focus on the worst-case scenario and to shy away from potentially controversial science; it is time, I think, we looked instead at the benefits.“

—  James D. Watson American molecular biologist, geneticist, and zoologist. 1928

Source: DNA: The Story of the Genetic Revolution (2003/2017), Chapter 13, “Who We Are: Nature vs. Nurture” (p. 372)

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„It is difficult to pronounce on the opinion of the ministers of our Church as a body: one portion of them, by far the least informed, protests against anything which can advance the honour and the interests of science, because, in their limited and mistaken view, science is adverse to religion.“

—  Charles Babbage mathematician, philosopher, inventor and mechanical engineer who originated the concept of a programmable computer 1791 - 1871

This is not the place to argue that great question. It is sufficient to remark, that the best-informed and most enlightened men of all creeds and pursuits, agree that truth can never damage truth, and that every truth is allied indissolubly by chains more or less circuitous with all other truths; whilst error, at every step we make in its diffusion, becomes not only wider apart and more discordant from all truths, but has also the additional chance of destruction from all rival errors.
Source: The Exposition of 1851: Views Of The Industry, The Science, and the Government Of England, 1851, p. 225

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