„This noble ensample to his shepe he yaf, —
That first he wrought, and afterwards he taught.“

General Prologue, l. 498
The Canterbury Tales

Last update May 22, 2020. History
Geoffrey Chaucer photo
Geoffrey Chaucer98
English poet 1343 - 1400

Related quotes

Benjamin Disraeli photo

„The noble lord in this case, as in so many others, first destroys his opponent, and then destroys his own position afterwards. The noble lord is the Prince Rupert of parliamentary discussion: his charge is resistless, but when he returns from the pursuit he always finds his camp in the possession of the enemy.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Speech in the House of Commons (24 April 1844), referring to Lord Stanley; compare: "The brilliant chief, irregularly great, / Frank, haughty, rash,—the Rupert of debate!", Edward Bulwer-Lytton, The New Timon (1846), Part i.
1840s

Geoffrey Chaucer photo
Robert Graves photo
Geoffrey Chaucer photo
Alec Douglas-Home photo
Michel De Montaigne photo
George C. Lorimer photo
Robert G. Ingersoll photo
Homér photo
George William Russell photo
Ludovico Ariosto photo

„But that he wrought so high the specious tale,
As manifested plainly, 'twas a lie.“

—  Ludovico Ariosto, book Orlando Furioso

Se non volea pulir sua scusa tanto,
Che la facesse di menzogna rea.
Canto XVIII, stanza 84 (tr. W. S. Rose)
Orlando Furioso (1532)

Plutarch photo
Sarah Grimké photo
Ayn Rand photo
George Eliot photo

„Each day he wrought and better than he planned,
Shape breeding shape beneath his restless hand.
(The soul without still helps the soul within,
And its deft magic ends what we begin.)“

—  George Eliot English novelist, journalist and translator 1819 - 1880

On the work of the metal-smith Tubal-Cain
The Legend of Jubal (1869)
Context: Each day he wrought and better than he planned,
Shape breeding shape beneath his restless hand.
(The soul without still helps the soul within,
And its deft magic ends what we begin.)
Nay, in his dreams his hammer he would wield
And seem to see a myriad types revealed,
Then spring with wondering triumphant cry,
And, lest the inspiring vision should go by,
Would rush to labor with that plastic zeal
Which all the passion of our life can steal
For force to work with. Each day saw the birth
Of various forms, which, flung upon the earth,
Seemed harmless toys to cheat the exacting hour,
But were as seeds instinct with hidden power.

Letitia Elizabeth Landon photo
Patrick Fitzgerald photo
John Greenleaf Whittier photo

„God blesses still the generous thought,
And still the fitting word He speeds,
And Truth, at His requiring taught,
He quickens into deeds.“

—  John Greenleaf Whittier American Quaker poet and advocate of the abolition of slavery 1807 - 1892

Channing, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“