„The truth of a proposition has little or nothing to do with its psychodynamics. The notion that ‘truth will prevail’ is merely a pious wish; history doesn’t show it.“

Methuselah’s Children (p. 606)
Short fiction, The Past Through Tomorrow (1967)

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update May 22, 2020. History
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Robert A. Heinlein521
American science fiction author 1907 - 1988

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„This argument too shows that in truth we know nothing about anything, but every man shares the generally prevailing opinion.“

—  Democritus Ancient Greek philosopher, pupil of Leucippus, founder of the atomic theory

Source Book in Ancient Philosophy (1907), The Fragments

Ludwig Wittgenstein photo

„Propositions are truth-functions of elementary propositions. (An elementary proposition is a truth-function of itself.) (5)“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein Austrian-British philosopher 1889 - 1951

Original German: Der Satz ist eine Wahrheitsfunktion der Elementarsätze
1920s, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1922)

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„The truth doesn’t hurt. Whatever it is, it doesn’t hurt. It’s better to know the truth.“

—  Ricky Gervais English comedian, actor, director, producer, musician, writer, and former radio presenter 1961

"Inside the Actors Studio," 2009 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBBtYcK9Jb8

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„Human history is in truth nothing but the history of the slow, uncertain, and surprising fulfillment of the Promise.“

—  Gustavo Gutiérrez Peruvian theologian 1928

Source: A Theology of Liberation - 15th Anniversary Edition, Chapter Nine, Liberation And Salvation, p. 91-92

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„I wished to tell the truth, for truth always conveys its own moral to those who are able to receive it.“

—  Anne Brontë British novelist and poet 1820 - 1849

Source: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Volume I

Jiddu Krishnamurti photo

„When the mind seeks truth, the truth it has read about in books, that "truth" is self-projected, for then the mind is merely in pursuit of the known, a more satisfactory known than the previous one. When the mind seeks truth, it is seeking its own self-projection, not truth.“

—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986

Vol. VI, p 5, "First Talk in Rajahmundry (20 November 1949) http://www.jkrishnamurti.com/krishnamurti-teachings/view-text.php?tid=335&chid=4655&w=%22You+cannot+find+truth+through+anybody+else%22, J.Krishnamurti Online, JKO Serial No. 491120
Posthumous publications, The Collected Works
Context: You cannot find truth through anybody else. How can you? Surely, truth is not something static; it has no fixed abode; it is not an end, a goal. On the contrary, it is living, dynamic, alert, alive. How can it be an end? If truth is a fixed point, it is no longer truth; it is then a mere opinion. Sir, truth is the unknown, and a mind that is seeking truth will never find it. For mind is made up of the known; it is the result of the past, the outcome of time — which you can observe for yourself. Mind is the instrument of the known; hence it cannot find the unknown; it can only move from the known to the known. When the mind seeks truth, the truth it has read about in books, that "truth" is self-projected, for then the mind is merely in pursuit of the known, a more satisfactory known than the previous one. When the mind seeks truth, it is seeking its own self-projection, not truth. After all, an ideal is self-projected; it is fictitious, unreal. What is real is what is, not the opposite. But a mind that is seeking reality, seeking God, is seeking the known. When you think of God, your God is the projection of your own thought, the result of social influences. You can think only of the known; you cannot think of the unknown, you cannot concentrate on truth. The moment you think of the unknown, it is merely the self-projected known. So, God or truth cannot be thought about. If you think about it, it is not truth. Truth cannot be sought; it comes to you. You can go after only what is known. When the mind is not tortured by the known, by the effects of the known, then only can truth reveal itself. Truth is in every leaf, every tear; it is to be known from moment to moment. No one can lead you to truth; and if anyone leads you, it can only be to the known.

Alexander Hamilton photo

„I have studied it, and I can prove its truth as clearly as any proposition ever submitted to the mind of man.“

—  Alexander Hamilton Founding Father of the United States 1757 - 1804

John Church Hamilton, History of the republic of the United States of America: as traced in the writings of Alexander Hamilton and of his cotemporaries, v. 7 p. 790. John Church Hamilton was Alexander Hamilton's son. He gives his source for the first quotation as the Reminiscences of General Morton, but gives no source for the second.
Attributed
Context: It was the tendency to infidelity he saw so rife that led him often to declare in the social circle his estimate of Christian truth. “I have examined carefully,” he said to a friend from his boyhood, “the evidence of the Christian religion; and, if I was sitting as a juror upon its authenticity, I should unhesitatingly give my verdict in its favor.” To another person, he observed, “I have studied it, and I can prove its truth as clearly as any proposition ever submitted to the mind of man.”

Ludwig Wittgenstein photo

„A tautology's truth is certain, a proposition's possible, a contradiction's impossible.“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein, book Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

Certain, possible, impossible: here we have the first indication of the scale that we need in the theory of probability.
4.464
Original German: Die Wahrheit der Tautologie ist gewiss, des Satzes möglich, der Kontradiktion unmöglich
Source: 1920s, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1922)

Gottlob Frege photo

„A judgment, for me is not the mere grasping of a thought, but the admission of its truth.“

—  Gottlob Frege, Sense and reference

Gottlob Frege (1892). On Sense and Reference, note 7.
Über Sinn und Bedeutung, 1892

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