„We will hang the capitalists with the rope that they sell us.“

According to the book, "They Never Said It", p. 64, there is no evidence Lenin ever said this. Lenin was supposed to have made his observation to one of his close associates, Grigori Zinoviev, not long after a meeting of the Politburo in the early 1920s, but there is no evidence that he ever did. Experts on the Soviet Union reject the rope quote as spurious.
Misattributed

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update July 22, 2021. History
Vladimir Lenin photo
Vladimir Lenin335
Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924

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Karl Marx photo

„We will hang the capitalists with the rope that they sell us.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

Often attributed to Lenin or Stalin, less often to Marx. According to the book, "They Never Said It", p. 64, the phrase derives from a rumour that Lenin said this to one of his close associates, Grigori Zinoviev, not long after a meeting of the Politburo in the early 1920s, but there is no evidence that he ever did. Experts on the Soviet Union reject the rope quote as spurious.
Misattributed

Joseph Stalin photo

„We will hang the capitalists with the rope that they sell us.“

—  Joseph Stalin General secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union 1879 - 1953

Often attributed to Stalin and Marx, according to the book, They Never Said It (1989), p. 64, the phrase derives from a rumour that Lenin said this to one of his close associates, Grigori Zinoviev, not long after a meeting of the Politburo in the early 1920s, but there is no evidence that he ever did. It has also been believed that Lenin may have expressed that the profit motive cannot be undone in that "If we were to hang the last capitalist, another would suddenly appear to sell us the rope". Experts on the Soviet Union reject the rope quote as spurious. However, it is established that Lenin did remark on the same underlying theme (even if not in reference to rope), namely, that capitalists in their addiction to high profits could not help themselves from selling things to a socialist state, even if it was against their own long-term interests by strengthening an enemy; Edvard Radzinsky covers it in his discussion of Lenin's comments on the "deaf-mutes" in Radzinsky's biography of Stalin.
Misattributed

Karl Marx photo

„If we were to hang the last capitalist, another would appear to sell us the rope.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

A variant of the above misquote, sometimes also attributed to Lenin. This gained popularity during the glasnost era when black market activity was at its most visible in the USSR; meant to show the profit motive was human nature and cannot be eradicated.
Misattributed

Karl Marx photo

„The last capitalist we hang shall be the one who sold us the rope.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

Tupac Shakur photo

„Niggers was the ones with the rope, hanging off trees; Niggas are the ones with gold ropes, hanging out at clubs.“

—  Tupac Shakur rapper and actor 1971 - 1996

Posthumous attributions, Tupac: Resurrection (2003)
Source: Resurrection, 1971-1996

Bob Dylan photo

„They're selling postcards of the hanging“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, Highway 61 Revisited (1965), Desolation Row

Abraham Lincoln photo

„When you reach the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Franklin D. Roosevelt photo

„When you reach the end of your rope, tie a knot in it and hang on.“

—  Franklin D. Roosevelt 32nd President of the United States 1882 - 1945

The earliest citation yet found does not attribute this to Roosevelt, but presents it as a piece of anonymous piece folk-wisdom: "When one reaches the end of his rope, he should tie a knot in it and hang on" ( LIFE magazine (3 April 1919), p. 585 http://hdl.handle.net/2027/wu.89063018576?urlappend=%3Bseq=65).
Misattributed
Variant: When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.

Thomas Fuller (writer) photo

„1657. Give him but Rope enough, and he'll hang himself.“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734

Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727), Gnomologia (1732)

Octavio Paz photo

„No one hangs himself by the rope of a physical law. The equations fall tirelessly into themselves.“

—  Octavio Paz Mexican writer laureated with the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature 1914 - 1998

The Clerk's Vision (1949)
Context: The world stretches out before me, the vast world of the big, the little, and the medium. Universe of kings and presidents and jailors, of mandarins and pariahs and liberators and liberated, of judges and witnesses and the condemned: stars of the first, second, third and nth magnitudes, planets, comets, bodies errant and eccentric or routine and domesticated by the laws of gravity, the subtle laws of falling, all keeping step, all turning slowly or rapidly around a void. Where they claim the central sun lies, the solar being, the hot beam made out of every human gaze, there is nothing but a hole and less than a hole: the eye of a dead fish, the giddy cavity of the eye that falls into itself and looks at itself without seeing. There is nothing with which to fill the hollow center of the whirlwind. The springs are smashed, the foundations collapsed, the visible or invisible bonds that joined one star to another, one body to another, one man to another, are nothing but a tangle of wires and thorns, a jungle of claws and teeth that twist us and chew us and spit us out and chew us again. No one hangs himself by the rope of a physical law. The equations fall tirelessly into themselves.
And in regard to the present matter, if the present matters: I do not belong to the masters. I don't wash my hands of it, but I am not a judge, nor a witness for the prosecution, nor an executioner. I do not torture, interrogate, or suffer interrogation. I do not loudly plead for leniency, nor wish to save myself or anyone else. And for all that I don't do and for all that they do to us, I neither ask forgiveness nor forgive. Their piety is as abject as their justice. Am I innocent? I'm guilty. Am I guilty? I'm innocent. (I'm innocent when I'm guilty, guilty when I'm innocent. I'm guilty when … but that is another song. Another song? It's all the same song.) Guilty innocent, innocent guilty, the fact is I quit.

Robert Burton photo
Charles Haughey photo

„You know, I have a theory about Charlie Haughey. If you give him enough rope, he'll hang you.“

—  Charles Haughey Irish politician 1925 - 2006

BBC Ireland correspondent Leo Enright at the end of Haughey's premiership.
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Francois Rabelais photo

„Following his example, I encourage all these diabolical calumniators to go hang themselves before the last moon's quarter is done. I will supply the rope.“

—  Francois Rabelais, book Gargantua and Pantagruel

A son [Timon le Misanthrope] exemple ie denonce à ces calumniateurs diaboliques, que tous ayent à se pendre dedans le dernier chanteau de ceste lune. Ie les fourniray de licolz.
Prologue of the 1548 "old" edition.
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Fourth Book (1548, 1552)

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