„The latest Gospel in this world is, Know thy work and do it. 'Know thyself:' long enough has that poor 'self' of thine tormented thee; thou wilt never get to 'know' it, I believe! Think it not thy business, this of knowing thyself; thou art an unknowable individual: know what thou canst work at; and work at it, like a Hercules! That will be thy better plan.“

1840s, Past and Present (1843)

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Thomas Carlyle Fotografia
Thomas Carlyle13
szkocki pisarz i filozof 1795 - 1881

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„Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world.“

—  Miguel de Cervantes Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright 1547 - 1616

Źródło: Don Quixote de la Mancha (1605–1615), Part II (1615), Book III, Ch. 42.

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„Man, if thou art aught, strive to walk alone and hold converse with yourself, instead of skulking in the chorus! at length think; look around thee; bestir thyself, that thou mayest know who thou art!“

—  Epictetus philosopher from Ancient Greece 50 - 138

Kontekst: Even as bad actors cannot sing alone, but only in chorus: so some cannot walk alone. Man, if thou art aught, strive to walk alone and hold converse with yourself, instead of skulking in the chorus! at length think; look around thee; bestir thyself, that thou mayest know who thou art! (103).

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„Great poet, 'twas thy art
To know thyself, and in thyself to be
Whate'er Love, Hate, Ambition, Destiny,
Or the firm, fatal purpose of the Heart
Can make of Man. Yet thou wert still the same,
Serene of thought, unhurt by thy own flame.“

—  Hartley Coleridge British poet, biographer, essayist, and teacher 1796 - 1849

"To Shakespeare"
Poems (1851)
Kontekst: The soul of man is larger than the sky,
Deeper than ocean, or the abysmal dark
Of the unfathomed center. Like that ark,
Which in its sacred hold uplifted high,
O'er the drowned hills, the human family,
And stock reserved of every living kind,
So, in the compass of the single mind,
The seeds and pregnant forms in essence lie,
That make all worlds. Great poet, 'twas thy art
To know thyself, and in thyself to be
Whate'er Love, Hate, Ambition, Destiny,
Or the firm, fatal purpose of the Heart
Can make of Man. Yet thou wert still the same,
Serene of thought, unhurt by thy own flame.

„Once thou art wed, no longer canst thou be
Lord of thyself.“

—  Alexis Athenian poet of Middle Comedy -372 - -270 p. n. e.

Fabulae Incertae, Fragment 34, 7.

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„Tell me thy company, and I'll tell thee what thou art.“

—  Miguel de Cervantes Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright 1547 - 1616

Źródło: Don Quixote de la Mancha (1605–1615), Part II (1615), Book III, Ch. 23.

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„Absence, hear thou my protestation
Against thy strength,
Distance, and length;
Do what thou canst for alteration“

—  John Donne English poet 1572 - 1631

Poem Present in Absence http://www.bartleby.com/101/197.html
Attribution likely but not proven http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0026-7937(191107)6%3A3%3C383%3ATAO%22HT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-B

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