Richard Francis Burton idézet

Richard Francis Burton fénykép
0   0

Richard Francis Burton

Születési dátum: 19. március 1821
Halál dátuma: 20. október 1890

Sir Richard Francis Burton angol felfedező, fordító, író, katona, orientalista, etnológus, nyelvész, költő, hipnotizőr, vívó és diplomata. A Szent Mihály és Szent György rend birtokosa, a Brit Királyi Földrajzi Társaság tagja. Ázsiai és afrikai utazásairól és felfedezőútjairól, valamint rendkívüli nyelvismeretéről és kultúraismeretéről volt nevezetes. Egy adat szerint 29 európai, ázsiai és afrikai nyelvet beszélt.Burton legismertebb cselekedetei közé sorolják álruhás utazását Mekkába, Az Ezeregyéjszaka meséi és a Kámaszútra csonkítatlan fordítását, valamint John Hanning Speke-kel tett utazásait, amint a Nílus forrásának keresése közben ománi kereskedők irányításával, első európaiként keresték fel az Afrikai Nagy-tavakat. Termékeny és nagy tudású szerző volt, aki számos könyvet és tudományos értekezést írt utazásairól, a vívásról és néprajzi megfigyeléseiről.

Indiai szolgálata alatt a Brit Kelet-indiai Társaság századosa volt . Ezt követően a Brit Királyi Földrajzi Társaság alkalmazásában Afrika keleti partjait kutatta; kutatásai során a helyi emberek útmutatása alapján expedíciót vezetett a kontinens belsejébe és felfedezte a Tanganyika-tavat. Élete delén brit konzulként dolgozott az egyenlítői guineai Fernando Pó-ban, a brazíliai Santosban, majd Damaszkuszban és végül Triesztben. Tagja volt a Brit Királyi Földrajzi Társaságnak, és 1886-ban lovagi címet is kapott. Wikipedia

Idézetek Richard Francis Burton

„Is not the highest honour his who from the worst hath drawn the best;
May not your Maker make the world from matter, an it suit His hest?“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: Is not the highest honour his who from the worst hath drawn the best;
May not your Maker make the world from matter, an it suit His hest? Nay more, the sordider the stuff the cunninger the workman's hand:
Cease, then, your own Almighty Power to bind, to bound, to understand.

„Both propose a reward for mere belief, and a penalty for simple unbelief; rewards and punishments being, by the way, very disproportionate. Thus they reduce everything to the scale of a somewhat unrefined egotism; and their demoralizing effects become clearer to every progressive age.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: Christianity and Islamism have been on their trial for the last eighteen and twelve centuries. They have been ardent in proselytizing, yet they embrace only one-tenth and one-twentieth of the human race. Hâjî Abdû would account for the tardy and unsatisfactory progress of what their votaries call "pure truths," by the innate imperfections of the same. Both propose a reward for mere belief, and a penalty for simple unbelief; rewards and punishments being, by the way, very disproportionate. Thus they reduce everything to the scale of a somewhat unrefined egotism; and their demoralizing effects become clearer to every progressive age.

„Learn from the mighty Spi'rits of old to set thy foot on Heav'en and Hell;
In Life to find thy hell and heav'en as thou abuse or use it well.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: There is no Heav'en, there is no Hell; these be the dreams of baby minds,
Tools of the wily Fetisheer, to 'fright the fools his cunning blinds.
Learn from the mighty Spi'rits of old to set thy foot on Heav'en and Hell;
In Life to find thy hell and heav'en as thou abuse or use it well.

„The Pilgrim holds with St. Augustine Absolute Evil is impossible because it is always rising up into good.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: The Pilgrim holds with St. Augustine Absolute Evil is impossible because it is always rising up into good. He considers the theory of a beneficent or maleficent deity a purely sentimental fancy, contradicted by human reason and the aspect of the world.

„Hâjî Abdû has been known to me for more years than I care to record.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: Hâjî Abdû has been known to me for more years than I care to record. A native, it is believed, of Dârabghird in the Yezd Province, he always preferred to style himself El-Hichmakani, a facetious "lackab" or surname, meaning "Of No-hall, Nowhere." He had travelled far and wide with his eyes open; as appears by his "couplets."

„And hold Humanity one man, whose universal agony
Still strains and strives to gain the goal, where agonies shall cease to be.
Believe in all things; none believe; judge not nor warp by "Facts" the thought;
See clear, hear clear, tho' life may seem Mâyâ and Mirage, Dream and Naught.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: And hold Humanity one man, whose universal agony
Still strains and strives to gain the goal, where agonies shall cease to be.
Believe in all things; none believe; judge not nor warp by "Facts" the thought;
See clear, hear clear, tho' life may seem Mâyâ and Mirage, Dream and Naught.
Abjure the Why and seek the How: the God and gods enthroned on high,
Are silent all, are silent still; nor hear thy voice, nor deign reply.
The Now, that indivisible point which studs the length of infinite line
Whose ends are nowhere, is thine all, the puny all thou callest thine.

„With him suspension of judgment is a system.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: The Hâjî regrets the excessive importance attached to a possible future state: he looks upon this as a psychical stimulant, a day dream, whose revulsion and reaction disorder waking life. The condition may appear humble and prosaic to those exalted by the fumes of Fancy, by a spiritual dram-drinking which, like the physical, is the pursuit of an ideal happiness. But he is too wise to affirm or to deny the existence of another world. For life beyond the grave there is no consensus of mankind… Even the instinctive sense of our kind is here dumb. We may believe what we are taught: we can know nothing. He would, therefore, cultivate that receptive mood which, marching under the shadow of mighty events, leads to the highest of goals, — the development of Humanity. With him suspension of judgment is a system.

„But my individuality, however all-sufficient for myself, is an infinitesimal point, an atom subject in all things to the Law of Storms called Life.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: I am an individual … a circle touching and intersecting my neighbours at certain points, but nowhere corresponding, nowhere blending. Physically I am not identical in all points with other men. Morally I differ from them: in nothing do the approaches of knowledge, my five organs of sense (with their Shelleyan "interpenetration"), exactly resemble those of any other being. Ergo, the effect of the world, of life, of natural objects, will not in my case be the same as with the beings most resembling me. Thus I claim the right of creating or modifying for my own and private use, the system which most imports me; and if the reasonable leave be refused to me, I take it without leave.
But my individuality, however all-sufficient for myself, is an infinitesimal point, an atom subject in all things to the Law of Storms called Life. I feel, I know that Fate is. But I cannot know what is or what is not fated to befall me. Therefore in the pursuit of perfection as an individual lies my highest, and indeed my only duty, the "I" being duly blended with the "We." I object to be a "self-less man," which to me denotes an inverted moral sense. I am bound to take careful thought concerning the consequences of every word and deed. When, however, the Future has become the Past, it would be the merest vanity for me to grieve or to repent over that which was decreed by universal Law.

„How Thought is imp'otent to divine the secret which the gods defend,
The Why of birth and life and death, that Isis-veil no hand may rend.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: How Thought is imp'otent to divine the secret which the gods defend,
The Why of birth and life and death, that Isis-veil no hand may rend.
Eternal Morrows make our day; our is is aye to be till when
Night closes in; 'tis all a dream, and yet we die, — and then and then?
And still the Weaver plies his loom, whose warp and woof is wretched Man
Weaving th' unpattern'd dark design, so dark we doubt it owns a plan.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„The Hâjî regrets the excessive importance attached to a possible future state: he looks upon this as a psychical stimulant, a day dream, whose revulsion and reaction disorder waking life.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: The Hâjî regrets the excessive importance attached to a possible future state: he looks upon this as a psychical stimulant, a day dream, whose revulsion and reaction disorder waking life. The condition may appear humble and prosaic to those exalted by the fumes of Fancy, by a spiritual dram-drinking which, like the physical, is the pursuit of an ideal happiness. But he is too wise to affirm or to deny the existence of another world. For life beyond the grave there is no consensus of mankind… Even the instinctive sense of our kind is here dumb. We may believe what we are taught: we can know nothing. He would, therefore, cultivate that receptive mood which, marching under the shadow of mighty events, leads to the highest of goals, — the development of Humanity. With him suspension of judgment is a system.

„The race of Be'ing from dawn of Life in an unbroken course was run;
What men are pleased to call their Souls was in the hog and dog begun: Life is a ladder infinite-stepped, that hides its rungs from human eyes;
Planted its foot in chaos-gloom, its head soars high above the skies: No break the chain of Being bears; all things began in unity;
And lie the links in regular line though haply none the sequence see.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: Words, words that gender things! The soul is a new-comer on the scene;
Sufficeth not the breath of Life to work the matter-born machine? The race of Be'ing from dawn of Life in an unbroken course was run;
What men are pleased to call their Souls was in the hog and dog begun: Life is a ladder infinite-stepped, that hides its rungs from human eyes;
Planted its foot in chaos-gloom, its head soars high above the skies: No break the chain of Being bears; all things began in unity;
And lie the links in regular line though haply none the sequence see.

„Is not man born with a love of change“

—  Richard Francis Burton

an Englishman to be discontented — an Anglo-Indian to grumble?
Goa, and The Blue Mountains; or, Six Months of Sick Leave (1851)

„Christianity and Islamism have been on their trial for the last eighteen and twelve centuries.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: Christianity and Islamism have been on their trial for the last eighteen and twelve centuries. They have been ardent in proselytizing, yet they embrace only one-tenth and one-twentieth of the human race. Hâjî Abdû would account for the tardy and unsatisfactory progress of what their votaries call "pure truths," by the innate imperfections of the same. Both propose a reward for mere belief, and a penalty for simple unbelief; rewards and punishments being, by the way, very disproportionate. Thus they reduce everything to the scale of a somewhat unrefined egotism; and their demoralizing effects become clearer to every progressive age.

„Do what thy manhood bids thee do, from none but self expect applause;
He noblest lives and noblest dies who makes and keeps his self-made laws.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: Do what thy manhood bids thee do, from none but self expect applause;
He noblest lives and noblest dies who makes and keeps his self-made laws.
All other Life is living Death, a world where none but Phantoms dwell,
A breath, a wind, a sound, a voice, a tinkling of the camel-bell.

„You pray, but hath your thought e'er weighed how empty vain the prayer must be,
That begs a boon already giv'en, or craves a change of law to see?“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: Your childish fears would seek a Sire, by the non-human God defined,
What your five wits may wot ye weet; what is you please to dub "designíd;"
You bring down Heavíen to vulgar Earth; your maker like yourselves you make,
You quake to own a reign of Law, you pray the Law its laws to break;
You pray, but hath your thought e'er weighed how empty vain the prayer must be,
That begs a boon already giv'en, or craves a change of law to see?

„Words, words that gender things!“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Kontextus: Words, words that gender things! The soul is a new-comer on the scene;
Sufficeth not the breath of Life to work the matter-born machine? The race of Be'ing from dawn of Life in an unbroken course was run;
What men are pleased to call their Souls was in the hog and dog begun: Life is a ladder infinite-stepped, that hides its rungs from human eyes;
Planted its foot in chaos-gloom, its head soars high above the skies: No break the chain of Being bears; all things began in unity;
And lie the links in regular line though haply none the sequence see.

„Of the gladest moments in human life, methinks is the departure upon a distant journey to unknown lands.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

Journal Entry (2 December 1856)
Kontextus: Of the gladest moments in human life, methinks is the departure upon a distant journey to unknown lands. Shaking off with one mighty effort the fetters of habit, the leaden weight of Routine, the cloak of many Cares and the Slavery of Home, man feels once more happy. The blood flows with the fast circulation of childhood.... afresh dawns the morn of life...

„Presently our fire being exhausted, and the enemy pressing on with spear and javelin, the position became untenable; the tent was nearly battered down by clubs, and had we been entangled in its folds, we should have been killed without the power of resistance.“

—  Richard Francis Burton

A brief account of the attack that left him scarred from a spearhead that entered one side of his face and exited the other, in "Narrative of a Trip to Harar" (11 June 1855); published in The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society <!-- Vol. 25, pp.136-150 --> (June 1855)
Kontextus: Presently our fire being exhausted, and the enemy pressing on with spear and javelin, the position became untenable; the tent was nearly battered down by clubs, and had we been entangled in its folds, we should have been killed without the power of resistance. I gave the word for a rush, and sallied out with my sabre, closely followed by Lieut. Herne, with Lieut. Speke in the rear. The former was allowed to pass through the enemy with no severer injury than a few hard blows with a war club. The latter was thrown down by a stone hurled at his chest and taken prisoner, a circumstance which we did not learn till afterwards. On leaving the tent I thought that I perceived the figure of the late Lieut. Stroyan lying upon the ground close to the camels. I was surrounded at the time by about a dozen of the enemy, whose clubs rattled upon me without mercy, and the strokes of my sabre were rendered uncertain by the energetic pushes of an attendant who thus hoped to save me. The blade was raised to cut him down: he cried out in dismay, and at that moment a Somali stepped forward, threw his spear so as to pierce my face, and retired before he could be punished. I then fell back for assistance, and the enemy feared pursuing us into the darkness. Many of our Somalis and servants were lurking about 100 yards from the fray, but nothing would persuade them to advance. The loss of blood causing me to feel faint, I was obliged to lie down, and, as dawn approached, the craft from Aynterad was seen apparently making sail out of the harbour.

„But he is too wise to affirm or to deny the existence of another world. For life beyond the grave there is no consensus of mankind…“

—  Richard Francis Burton

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870), Note I : Hâjî Abdû, The Man
Kontextus: The Hâjî regrets the excessive importance attached to a possible future state: he looks upon this as a psychical stimulant, a day dream, whose revulsion and reaction disorder waking life. The condition may appear humble and prosaic to those exalted by the fumes of Fancy, by a spiritual dram-drinking which, like the physical, is the pursuit of an ideal happiness. But he is too wise to affirm or to deny the existence of another world. For life beyond the grave there is no consensus of mankind… Even the instinctive sense of our kind is here dumb. We may believe what we are taught: we can know nothing. He would, therefore, cultivate that receptive mood which, marching under the shadow of mighty events, leads to the highest of goals, — the development of Humanity. With him suspension of judgment is a system.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Hasonló szerzők

Oscar Wilde fénykép
Oscar Wilde143
ír költő, író, drámaíró
Lewis Carroll fénykép
Lewis Carroll9
angol író, költő, matematikus, anglikán pap és fényképész
George Gordon Byron fénykép
George Gordon Byron32
angol költő, író
William Blake fénykép
William Blake25
angol költő, festő, grafikus és nyomdász
Stendhal fénykép
Stendhal18
francia realista író
Id. Alexandre Dumas fénykép
Id. Alexandre Dumas16
francia író, költő, drámaíró (1802–1870)
Victor Hugo fénykép
Victor Hugo53
francia romantikus költő, regény- és drámaíró
Mai évfordulók
Dzsafar al-Szádik fénykép
Dzsafar al-Szádik
muszlim jogtudós és vallási személy 702 - 765
Robert Louis Stevenson fénykép
Robert Louis Stevenson1
skót regényíró 1850 - 1894
Radzsendra Praszad fénykép
Radzsendra Praszad
(1884–1963) indiai politikus, India első köztársasági elnöke 1884 - 1963
Több 14 mai évfordulók
Hasonló szerzők
Oscar Wilde fénykép
Oscar Wilde143
ír költő, író, drámaíró
Lewis Carroll fénykép
Lewis Carroll9
angol író, költő, matematikus, anglikán pap és fényképész
George Gordon Byron fénykép
George Gordon Byron32
angol költő, író
William Blake fénykép
William Blake25
angol költő, festő, grafikus és nyomdász
Stendhal fénykép
Stendhal18
francia realista író