„A god that can be understood is not a god.“

—  William Somerset Maugham, könyv The Razor's Edge

The Razor's Edge (1943), p. 283

Forrás Wikiquote. Szerkesztette Martin Svoboda. Utolsó frissítés 2021. június 10.. Történelem

Hasonló idézetek

Graham Greene fénykép
Jürgen Moltmann fénykép
Evelyn Underhill fénykép
Ramakrishna fénykép

„The Master said: "Everything that exists is God." The pupil understood it literally, but not in the true spirit.“

—  Ramakrishna Indian mystic and religious preacher 1836 - 1886

Saying 15
Râmakrishna : His Life and Sayings (1898)
Kontextus: The Master said: "Everything that exists is God." The pupil understood it literally, but not in the true spirit. While he was passing through a street, he met with an elephant. The driver (mahut) shouted aloud from his high place, "Move away, move away!" The pupil argued in his mind, "Why should I move away? I am God, so is the elephant also God. What fear has God of Himself?" Thinking thus he did not move. At last the elephant took him up by his trunk, and dashed him aside. He was severely hurt, and going back to his Master, he related the whole adventure. The Master said, "All right, you are God. The elephant is God also, but God in the shape of the elephant-driver was warning you also from above. Why did you not pay heed to his warnings?"

Leo Tolstoy fénykép

„I have now understood that though it seems to men that they live by care for themselves, in truth it is love alone by which they live. He who has love, is in God, and God is in him, for God is love.“

—  Leo Tolstoy, könyv What Men Live By

Forrás: What Men Live By (1881), Ch. XII
Kontextus: And the angel's body was bared, and he was clothed in light so that eye could not look on him; and his voice grew louder, as though it came not from him but from heaven above. And the angel said:
I have learnt that all men live not by care for themselves, but by love.
It was not given to the mother to know what her children needed for their life. Nor was it given to the rich man to know what he himself needed. Nor is it given to any man to know whether, when evening comes, he will need boots for his body or slippers for his corpse.
I remained alive when I was a man, not by care of myself, but because love was present in a passer-by, and because he and his wife pitied and loved me. The orphans remained alive, not because of their mother's care, but because there was love in the heart of a woman a stranger to them, who pitied and loved them. And all men live not by the thought they spend on their own welfare, but because love exists in man.
I knew before that God gave life to men and desires that they should live; now I understood more than that.
I understood that God does not wish men to live apart, and therefore he does not reveal to them what each one needs for himself; but he wishes them to live united, and therefore reveals to each of them what is necessary for all.
I have now understood that though it seems to men that they live by care for themselves, in truth it is love alone by which they live. He who has love, is in God, and God is in him, for God is love.

„If God exists, God can be experienced; but only by you.“

—  Barry Long Australian spiritual teacher and writer 1926 - 2003

Knowing Yourself: The True in the False (1996)

Nicholas Sparks fénykép
Percy Bysshe Shelley fénykép
Julian of Norwich fénykép
Arturo Pérez-Reverte fénykép
Dante Alighieri fénykép

„At once I understood,
and I was sure this was that sect of evil souls who were
hateful to God and to His enemies.“

—  Dante Alighieri, könyv Inferno

Canto III, lines 61–63 (tr. Mark Musa).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Inferno

Kurt Vonnegut fénykép
Susan Elizabeth Phillips fénykép
Julian of Norwich fénykép

„Then I understood thus: that if a man or woman were under the broad water, if he might have sight of God so as God is with a man continually, he should be safe in body and soul, and take no harm: and overpassing, he should have more solace and comfort than all this world can tell.“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416

The Second Revelation, Chapter 10
Kontextus: One time mine understanding was led down into the sea-ground, and there I saw hills and dales green, seeming as it were moss-be-grown, with wrack and gravel. Then I understood thus: that if a man or woman were under the broad water, if he might have sight of God so as God is with a man continually, he should be safe in body and soul, and take no harm: and overpassing, he should have more solace and comfort than all this world can tell. For He willeth we should believe that we see Him continually though that to us it seemeth but little; and in this belief He maketh us evermore to gain grace. For He will be seen and He will be sought: He will be abided and he will be trusted.

Robert G. Ingersoll fénykép
Meher Baba fénykép

„If God can be found through the medium of any drug, God is not worthy of being God.“

—  Meher Baba, könyv God in a Pill?

God in a Pill? : Meher Baba on L.S.D. and The High Roads (1966)
General sources

Cees Nooteboom fénykép
Leo Tolstoy fénykép

„God is not, as in scholasticism, the final subject of all predicates. He is being as unpredicable. The existence of the creature, in so far as it exists, is the existence of God, and the creature’s experience of God is therefore in the final analysis equally unpredicable. Neither can even be described; both can only be indicated. We can only point at reality, our own or God’s.“

—  Kenneth Rexroth American poet, writer, anarchist, academic and conscientious objector 1905 - 1982

"Eckhart, Brethren of the Free Spirit," from Communalism: From Its Origins to the Twentieth Century (1974), ch. 4
Kontextus: The influence of Meister Eckhart is stronger today than it has been in hundreds of years. Eckhart met the problems of contingency and omnipotence, creator-and-creature-from-nothing by making God the only reality and the presence or imprint of God upon nothing, the source of reality in the creature. Reality in other words was a hierarchically structured participation of the creature in the creator. From the point of view of the creature this process could be reversed. If creatureliness is real, God becomes the Divine Nothing. God is not, as in scholasticism, the final subject of all predicates. He is being as unpredicable. The existence of the creature, in so far as it exists, is the existence of God, and the creature’s experience of God is therefore in the final analysis equally unpredicable. Neither can even be described; both can only be indicated. We can only point at reality, our own or God’s. The soul comes to the realization of God by knowledge, not as in the older Christian mysticism by love. Love is the garment of knowledge. The soul first trains itself by systematic unknowing until at last it confronts the only reality, the only knowledge, God manifest in itself. The soul can say nothing about this experience in the sense of defining it. It can only reveal it to others.

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