„What experience and history teach is this — that nations and governments have never learned anything from history, or acted upon any lessons they might have drawn from it.“

—  Georg Hegel, könyv Lectures on the Philosophy of History

Introduction, as translated by H. B. Nisbet (1975)
Variant translation: What experience and history teach is this — that people and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles deduced from it.
Pragmatical (didactic) reflections, though in their nature decidedly abstract, are truly and indefeasibly of the Present, and quicken the annals of the dead Past with the life of to-day. Whether, indeed, such reflections are truly interesting and enlivening, depends on the writer's own spirit. Moral reflections must here be specially noticed, the moral teaching expected from history; which latter has not unfrequently been treated with a direct view to the former. It may be allowed that examples of virtue elevate the soul, and are applicable in the moral instruction of children for impressing excellence upon their minds. But the destinies of peoples and states, their interests, relations, and the complicated tissue of their affairs, present quite another field. Rulers, Statesmen, Nations, are wont to be emphatically commended to the teaching which experience offers in history. But what experience and history teach is this, that peoples and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles deduced from it. Each period is involved in such peculiar circumstances, exhibits a condition of things so strictly idiosyncratic, that its conduct must be regulated by considerations connected with itself, and itself alone. Amid the pressure of great events, a general principle gives no help. It is useless to revert to similar circumstances in the Past. The pallid shades of memory struggle in vain with the life and freedom of the Present.
Lectures on the History of History Vol 1 p. 6 John Sibree translation (1857), 1914
Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1832), Volume 1

Forrás Wikiquote. Utolsó frissítés 2020. május 22.. Történelem
Georg Hegel fénykép
Georg Hegel5
német filozófus, egyetemi tanár 1770 - 1831

Hasonló idézetek

Aldous Huxley fénykép

„That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

Forrás: " A Case of Voluntary Ignorance http://www.christiebooks.com/ChristieBooksWP/2013/11/a-case-of-voluntary-ignorance-by-aldous-huxley/" in Collected Essays (1959)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge fénykép
Albert Einstein fénykép
Andrew Hsia fénykép

„The two sides (Mainland China and Taiwan) should learn a lesson from history and never fight each other again.“

—  Andrew Hsia Taiwanese politician 1950

Andrew Hsia (2015) cited in " Hsia, Zhang evoke the past at Taiwan-China meeting http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201505230020.aspx" on Focus Taiwan, 23 May 2015.

George Bernard Shaw fénykép
Steven Erikson fénykép
Woodrow Wilson fénykép
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel fénykép
Desmond Tutu fénykép

„We learn from history that we don't learn from history!“

—  Desmond Tutu South African churchman, politician, archbishop, Nobel Prize winner 1931

Often attributed to Desmond Tutu, actual source is G. W. F Hegel: What experience and history teach is this — that nations and governments have never learned anything from history, or acted upon any lessons they might have drawn from it. Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1832)
Misattributed

Harold W. Percival fénykép
Jimmy Carter fénykép

„History teaches, perhaps, very few clear lessons. But surely one such lesson learned by the world at great cost is that aggression, unopposed, becomes a contagious disease.“

—  Jimmy Carter American politician, 39th president of the United States (in office from 1977 to 1981) 1924

Speech on Afghanistan (4 January 1980) http://millercenter.org/president/carter/speeches/speech-3403
Presidency (1977–1981), 1978

Jonah Goldberg fénykép

„Keeping Germany from acting too German (or at least too Prussian) is an important lesson of history.“

—  Jonah Goldberg American political writer and pundit 1969

"Nationalism and Nationism" https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/nationalism-debate-nation-states/ (3 April 2019), National Review
2010s, 2019

Newton Lee fénykép

„You cannot rely upon what you have been taught. All you have learned from history is old ways of making mistakes. There is nothing that history can tell you about what we must do tomorrow. Only what we must not do.“

—  Edwin H. Land American scientist and inventor 1909 - 1991

Address to Polaroid employees at Symphony Hall in Boston, Massachusetts (5 February 1960), as quoted in Insisting on the Impossible : The Life of Edwin Land (1998) by Victor K. McElheny, p. 198
Kontextus: The world is a scene changing so rapidly that it takes every bit of intuitive ability you have, every brain cell each one of you has, to make the sensible decision about what to do next. You cannot rely upon what you have been taught. All you have learned from history is old ways of making mistakes. There is nothing that history can tell you about what we must do tomorrow. Only what we must not do.

Dorothy Thompson fénykép
Mark Heard fénykép
James A. Garfield fénykép

„The lesson of History is rarely learned by the actors themselves.“

—  James A. Garfield American politician, 20th President of the United States (in office in 1881) 1831 - 1881

Letter to Professor Demmon (16 December 1871), in The Life and Public Services of James A. Garfield (1881) by E. E. Brown, p. 424 http://books.google.com/books?id=vCAFAAAAYAAJ
1870s

Michael Swanwick fénykép
C. Wright Mills fénykép

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