„If I shout:
Ideal, Ideal, Ideal
Knowledge, Knowledge, Knowledge,
Boomboom, Boomboom, Boomboom
I have recorded fairly accurately Progress, Law, Morals, and all the other magnificent qualities that various very intelligent people have discussed in so many books.“

As quoted in The Dada Almanac: Berlin 1920, (1983) ed. Richard Huelsenbeck, transl. Malcolm Green, p.127
1920s

Adopté de Wikiquote. Dernière mise à jour 3 juin 2021. L'histoire
Tristan Tzara photo
Tristan Tzara4
écrivain français 1896 - 1963

Citations similaires

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„In an ideal University, as I conceive it, a man should be able to obtain instruction in all forms of knowledge, and discipline in the use of all the methods by which knowledge is obtained.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley English biologist and comparative anatomist 1825 - 1895

Universities, Actual and Ideal (1874)
1870s
Contexte: In an ideal University, as I conceive it, a man should be able to obtain instruction in all forms of knowledge, and discipline in the use of all the methods by which knowledge is obtained. In such a University, the force of living example should fire the student with a noble ambition to emulate the learning of learned men, and to follow in the footsteps of the explorers of new fields of knowledge. And the very air he breathes should be charged with that enthusiasm for truth, that fanaticism of veracity, which is a greater possession than much learning; a nobler gift than the power of increasing knowledge; by so much greater and nobler than these, as the moral nature of man is greater than the intellectual; for veracity is the heart of morality.

„All realism derives from the analysis of knowledge; all idealism derives from the analysis of a thought.“

—  Étienne Gilson French historian and philosopher 1884 - 1978

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„He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth.“

—  Albert Einstein, livre The Evolution of Physics

The Evolution of Physics (1938) (co-written with Leopold Infeld) <!-- later published by Simon & Schuster (1967) -->
1930s
Contexte: Physical concepts are free creations of the human mind, and are not, however it may seem, uniquely determined by the external world. In our endeavor to understand reality we are somewhat like a man trying to understand the mechanism of a closed watch. He sees the face and the moving hands, even hears its ticking, but he has no way of opening the case. If he is ingenious he may form some picture of a mechanism which could be responsible for all the things he observes, but he may never be quite sure his picture is the only one which could explain his observations. He will never be able to compare his picture with the real mechanism and he cannot even imagine the possibility or the meaning of such a comparison. But he certainly believes that, as his knowledge increases, his picture of reality will become simpler and simpler and will explain a wider and wider range of his sensuous impressions. He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth.

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„Yet, though the French Revolution was so largely inspired by the ideal of the Rule of Law, it is questionable whether it really helped the advance towards that ideal. In its course too many different aspirations gained influence which it was difficult to reconcile with that ideal.“

—  Friedrich Hayek Austrian and British economist and Nobel Prize for Economics laureate 1899 - 1992

Lecture II. Liberalism and Administration: The Rechtsstaat - 7. Montesquieu, Rousseau, and the French Revolution
1940s–1950s, The Political Ideal of the Rule of Law (1955)

„Since I leapt into the world an empiricist, ideality was not a quality I wanted.“

—  Donald Judd artist 1928 - 1994

Donald Judd in Art Journal, (1981); Quoted in: David Raskin. Donald Judd. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010.
1980

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„In democratic countries knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others.“

—  Alexis De Tocqueville, livre De la démocratie en Amérique

Book Two, Chapter V.
Democracy in America, Volume II (1840), Book Two
Contexte: Americans of all ages, all stations of life, and all types of disposition are forever forming associations... In democratic countries knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others.

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„We know in bodies only matter, and we observe the faculty of feeling only in bodies: on what foundation then can we erect an ideal being, disowned by all our knowledge?“

—  Julien Offray de La Mettrie French physician and philosopher 1709 - 1751

Source: The Natural History of the Soul (1745), Ch. VI Concerning the Sensitive Faculty of Matter

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„Knowledge is not the most important thing. The most important is your political quality and moral quality.“

—  Zhang Zhaozhong Chinese admiral 1952

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„The ideal country does not exist, as progress would discontinue. A life without ideals would be individually miserable and politically useless.“

—  Egils Levits Latvian judge, jurist and politician 1955

Source: Address given Assuming the Office / at the Saeima, https://www.president.lv/en/article/address-he-president-latvia-mr-egils-levits-assuming-office-saeima

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