„He (Bose) was modern India’s first physicist after all, one of her very first scientists. He was his motherland’s first active participant in the Galilean - Newtonian tradition. He had confounded the British disbeliever. He had shown that the Eastern mind was indeed capable of the exact and exacting thinking demanded by western science. He had broken the mould.“

By S. Dasgupta
Acharya Jagadish Chandra Bose in Vijayaprasara

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update Sept. 14, 2021. History
Jagadish Chandra Bose photo
Jagadish Chandra Bose17
Bengali polymath, physicist, biologist, botanist and archae… 1858 - 1937

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