„Now it is established in the sciences that no knowledge is acquired save through the study of its causes and beginnings, if it has had causes and beginnings; nor completed except by knowledge of its accidents and accompanying essentials.“

—  Avicenna

"On Medicine, (c. 1020) http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/1020Avicenna-Medicine.html
Context: The knowledge of anything, since all things have causes, is not acquired or complete unless it is known by its causes. Therefore in medicine we ought to know the causes of sickness and health. And because health and sickness and their causes are sometimes manifest, and sometimes hidden and not to be comprehended except by the study of symptoms, we must also study the symptoms of health and disease. Now it is established in the sciences that no knowledge is acquired save through the study of its causes and beginnings, if it has had causes and beginnings; nor completed except by knowledge of its accidents and accompanying essentials. Of these causes there are four kinds: material, efficient, formal, and final.

Last update May 22, 2020. History
Avicenna photo
Avicenna8
medieval Persian polymath, physician, and philosopher 980 - 1037

Related quotes

Avicenna photo

„The knowledge of anything, since all things have causes, is not acquired or complete unless it is known by its causes.“

—  Avicenna medieval Persian polymath, physician, and philosopher 980 - 1037

"On Medicine, (c. 1020) http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/1020Avicenna-Medicine.html
Context: The knowledge of anything, since all things have causes, is not acquired or complete unless it is known by its causes. Therefore in medicine we ought to know the causes of sickness and health. And because health and sickness and their causes are sometimes manifest, and sometimes hidden and not to be comprehended except by the study of symptoms, we must also study the symptoms of health and disease. Now it is established in the sciences that no knowledge is acquired save through the study of its causes and beginnings, if it has had causes and beginnings; nor completed except by knowledge of its accidents and accompanying essentials. Of these causes there are four kinds: material, efficient, formal, and final.

G. I. Gurdjieff photo

„Knowledge can be acquired by a suitable and complete study, no matter what the starting point is.“

—  G. I. Gurdjieff influential spiritual teacher, Armenian philosopher, composer and writer 1866 - 1949

All and Everything: Views from the Real World (1973)
Context: Knowledge can be acquired by a suitable and complete study, no matter what the starting point is. Only one must know how to "learn." What is nearest to us is man; and you are the nearest of all men to yourself. Begin with the study of yourself; remember the saying "Know thyself."

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Mao Zedong photo
Marilyn vos Savant photo

„To acquire knowledge, one must study; but to acquire wisdom, one must observe.“

—  Marilyn vos Savant US American magazine columnist, author and lecturer 1946

As quoted in Courage: the heart and spirit of every woman : reclaiming the forgotten virtue (2001) by Sandra Ford Walston

Herbert Spencer photo

„If there be an order in which the human race has mastered its various kinds of knowledge, there will arise in every child an aptitude to acquire these kinds of knowledge in the same order.“

—  Herbert Spencer English philosopher, biologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist 1820 - 1903

Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1861)
Context: If there be an order in which the human race has mastered its various kinds of knowledge, there will arise in every child an aptitude to acquire these kinds of knowledge in the same order. So that even were the order intrinsically indifferent, it would facilitate education to lead the individual mind through the steps traversed by the general mind. But the order is not intrinsically indifferent; and hence the fundamental reason why education should be a repetition of civilization in little.<!--p.76

Henri Lefebvre photo

„It is through knowledge that the proletarian liberates himself and begins actively superseding his condition.“

—  Henri Lefebvre French philosopher 1901 - 1991

From Critique of Everyday Life: Volume 1 (1947/1991)
Context: It is through knowledge that the proletarian liberates himself and begins actively superseding his condition. Moreover in this effort to attain knowledge and awareness, he is forced to assimilate complex theories (economic, social, political...), i. e. to integrate the loftiest findings of science and culture into his own consciousness.
On the other hand the petty bourgeois and bourgeois, as such, are barred access to the human.
For them to become humanized, they must break with themselves, reject themselves, an endeavor which on an individual level is frequently real and pathetic … We should understand men in a human way, even if they are incomplete; conditions are not confined within precise, geometrically defined boundaries, but are the result of a multitude of obstinate and ever-repeated (everyday) causes. Attempts to escape from the bourgeois condition are not particularly rare; on the other hand, the failure of such attempts are virtually inevitable, precisely because it is not so much a question of suppression but of a complete break. (Among intellectuals, this notion of super session is frequently false and harmful; when they supersede themselves as petty-bourgeois or bourgeois intellectuals, they are often merely continuing in the same direction and following their own inclinations in the belief that they are 'superseding themselves'. So far from gaining a new consciousness, they are merely making the old one worse. There is nothing more unbearable than the intellectual who believes himself to be free and human, while in every action, gesture, word and thought he shows that he has never stepped beyond bourgeois consciousness.)

Bertrand Russell photo

„It is not by prayer and humility that you cause things to go as you wish, but by acquiring a knowledge of natural laws.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

1950s, The Impact of Science on Society (1952)

Nayef Al-Rodhan photo

„All knowledge is acquired through the application of reason and has a physical basis.“

—  Nayef Al-Rodhan philosopher, neuroscientist, geostrategist, and author 1959

Source: Sustainable History and the Dignity of Man (2009), p.28

Aristotle photo
Jordan Peterson photo

„Evil is the force that believes its knowledge is complete.“

—  Jordan Peterson Canadian clinical psychologist, cultural critic, and professor of psychology 1962

Other

Vyasa photo
Virgil photo

„Blessed is he who has been able to win knowledge of the causes of things.“

—  Virgil, Georgics

Book II, line 490 (tr. H. Rushton Fairclough); homage to Lucretius.
John Dryden's translation:
: Happy the man, who, studying nature's laws,
Thro' known effects can trace the secret cause.
Georgics (29 BC)
Original: (la) Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas.

L. Ron Hubbard photo

„The subject of philosophy is very ancient. The word means: "The love, study or pursuit of wisdom, or of knowledge of things and their causes, whether theoretical or practical."“

—  L. Ron Hubbard American science fiction author, philosopher, cult leader, and the founder of the Church of Scientology 1911 - 1986

All we know of science or of religion comes from philosophy. It lies behind and above all other knowledge we have or use.
My Philosophy (1965) http://www.foundingchurchdc.org/dc/ref/philo/index.htm.

Benjamin Disraeli photo

„Where knowledge ends, religion begins.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Remark, attributed in John Gordon Stewart Drysdale and John James Drysdale, The Protoplasmic Theory of Life (1874), p. 279 (note).
Sourced but undated

Thomas Carlyle photo

„A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge.“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

Article on Biography.
1820s, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays (1827–1855)
Variant: For love is ever the beginning of Knowledge, as fire is of light.

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George Santayana photo

„Knowledge of what is possible is the beginning of happiness.“

—  George Santayana 20th-century Spanish-American philosopher associated with Pragmatism 1863 - 1952

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“