„The family unit is the institution for the systematic production of mental illness.“

Interview on "The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson" promoting the latest edition of his book The Natural Superiority of Women (orig. 1952)
Quoted in David Berg, Run, Brother, Run http://books.google.gr/books?id=FWwXuRNRup8C&dq=, Simon and Schuster, 2013, p. 242.

Last update May 22, 2020. History
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Ashley Montagu8
British-American anthropologist 1905 - 1999

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„That portion of the earth's surface which is owned and inhabited by the people of the United States is well adapted to be the home of one national family, and it is not well adapted for two or more. Its vast extent and its variety of climate and productions are of advantage in this age for“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

1860s, Second State of the Union address (1862)
Context: That portion of the earth's surface which is owned and inhabited by the people of the United States is well adapted to be the home of one national family, and it is not well adapted for two or more. Its vast extent and its variety of climate and productions are of advantage in this age for one people, whatever they might have been in former ages. Steam, telegraphs, and intelligence have brought these to be an advantageous combination for one united people.

„The family unit is man's noblest device for being bored.“

—  Mignon McLaughlin American journalist 1913 - 1983

The Complete Neurotic's Notebook (1981), Unclassified

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„The family unit is the incubator for human character; the state is the incubator for human dependency.“

—  Robert LeFevre American libertarian businessman 1911 - 1986

“The Family”, Pine Tree Press (Nov. 1963) p. 16.

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„I passed an entire night in mental turmoil. Ultimately, I decided to take the plunge without even informing my family.“

—  Gulzarilal Nanda Prime Minister of India 1898 - 1998

India Today in: "Gulzarilal Nanda: Profile in austerity".
When he joined the Freedom Movement in 1921 after he met Mahatma Gandhi.

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„When I consider the dead and their families, I cannot repress my mental agony.“

—  Hirohito Emperor of Japan from 1926 until 1989 1901 - 1989

Draft of undelivered speech (1948); published in the magazine Bungeishunju as quoted in the Sydney Morning Herald (11 June 2003) http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/06/10/1055220599574.html.

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„Then what you find out is, what humans then do is, they create institutions - that's where institutionalism has a tie with Post Keynesianism - they create institutions which limit outcomes, which permit you to control outcomes as long as the society agrees to live by the rules of the game, which are the rules of the institutions. Now, if society rejects those rules, then society breaks down. What are the rules of the game? Well, money is a rule of the economic game. There are lots of human economic arrangements which don't use money. The family unit solves its economic problems, of what and how to produce within the family, without the use of money and without the use of markets. All the 24 hours of the day are either employed or leisure. There's no involuntary unemployment in the family. So you can solve the problem, but it's a different economy. We are talking about a money-using economy, and money is a human institution. You have to ask yourself, why was it created? Why is it so strange? You see, in Lerner, in neoclassical economics, money is a commodity. It's peanuts, with a very high elasticity of production. If people want more money, that creates just as many jobs as if people want goods. Then you have to say to yourself - and this was the question that Milton Friedman asked me in the debate - he says, 'That's nonsense; Davidson says money is not producible. Why are there historical cases where Indians used beads as money? Aren't beads easily producible?“

—  Paul Davidson Post Keynesian economist 1930

But not in the Indian economy. They didn't know how to produce them.
quoted in Conversations with Post Keynesians (1995) by J. E. King

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