„All men have an equal disposition for understanding.“

Source: De l'esprit or, Essays on the Mind, and Its Several Faculties (1758), p. 286

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Claude Adrien Helvétius photo
Claude Adrien Helvétius8
French philosopher 1715 - 1771

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„All beings are ends; no creatures are means. All beings have not equal rights, neither have all men; but all have rights.“

—  J. Howard Moore 1862 - 1916

The Life Process is the End—not man, nor any other animal temporarily privileged to weave a world's philosophy. Non-human beings were not made for human beings any more than human beings were made for non-human beings. Just as the sidereal spheres were once supposed by the childish mind of man to be unsubstantial satellites of the earth, but are known by man's riper understanding to be worlds with missions and materialities of their own, and of such magnitude and number as to render terrestrial insignificance frightful, so the billions that dwell in the seas, fields, and atmospheres of the earth were in like manner imagined by the illiterate children of the race to be the mere trinkets of men, but are now known by all who can interpret the new revelation to be beings with substantially the same origin, the same natures, structures, and occupations, and the same general rights to life and happiness, as we ourselves.
"Conclusion", p. 324
The Universal Kinship (1906), The Ethical Kinship

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„You have theories enough concerning the Rights of Men. It may not be amiss to add a small degree of attention to their Nature and disposition.“

—  Edmund Burke Anglo-Irish statesman 1729 - 1797

Letter to Charles-Jean-François Depont (November 1789), quoted in Alfred Cobban and Robert A. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, Volume VI: July 1789–December 1791 (Cambridge University Press, 1967), p. 46
1780s

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„The desire to annoy no one, to harm no one, can equally well be the sign of a just as of an anxious disposition.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and classical philologist 1844 - 1900

„As men, we are all equal in the presence of death.“

—  Publilio Siro Latin writer

Maxim 1
Sentences, The Moral Sayings of Publius Syrus, a Roman Slave

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„All men are by nature born equally free and independent.“

—  George Mason American delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention 1725 - 1792

Remarks on Annual Elections (1775)

Cecil Rhodes photo

„Equal rights for all civilized men south of the Zambesi.“

—  Cecil Rhodes British businessman, mining magnate and politician in South Africa 1853 - 1902

Gordon Le Sueur, Cecil Rhodes the Man and His Work http://books.google.com/books?id=96AYdAqncoYC&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&dq=%22equal+rights+for+all+civilized+men%22&source=bl&ots=m1cSqKQE0h&sig=r1b3XeSqYuVKlAfdmkBZ32mP3ps&hl=en&ei=97xgS6r1CJTatgO2u8XGCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CCMQ6AEwCDgK#v=onepage&q=%22equal%20rights%20for%20all%20civilized%20men%22&f=false (2009), pg. 76
Le Sueur states that Rhodes originally said, c. 1893: "Equal rights every white man south of the Zambesi", as reported in the press, and he later "clarified" it.

René Guénon photo

„If an idea is true, it belongs equally to all who are capable of understanding it.“

—  René Guénon French metaphysician 1886 - 1951

Source: The Crisis of the Modern World (1927), p. 73

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„If Women Have An Equal EMPLOYMENT Opportunity Commission, Why Don’t Men Have An Equal FAMILY Opportunity Commission?“

—  Warren Farrell author, spokesperson, expert witness, political candidate 1943

Source: Father and Child Reunion (2001), p. 197.

Albert Pike photo

„It is, civilly, all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights.“

—  Albert Pike, book Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry

Source: Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry (1871), Ch. II : The Fellow-Craft, p. 44
Context: From the political point of view there is but a single principle,— the sovereignty of man over himself. This sovereignty of one's self over one's self is called Liberty. Where two or several of these sovereignties associate, the State begins. But in this association there is no abdication. Each sovereignty parts with a certain portion of itself to form the common right. That portion is the same for all. There is equal contribution by all to the joint sovereignty. This identity of concession which each makes to all, is Equality. The common right is nothing more or less than the protection of all, pouring its rays on each. This protection of each by all, is Fraternity.
Liberty is the summit, Equality the base. Equality is not all vegetation on a level, a society of big spears of grass and stunted oaks, a neighborhood of jealousies, emasculating each other. It is, civilly, all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights.

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„The doctrine that all men are, in any sense, or have been, at any time, free and equal, is an utterly baseless fiction.“

—  Thomas Henry Huxley English biologist and comparative anatomist 1825 - 1895

"On The Natural Inequality of Men" (January 1890)
1890s

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„The Scriptures make the test of believing to lie in the life and in the disposition. They nowhere require men, as the condition of acceptance and salvation, to be technically and philosophically right on all points of belief“

—  Henry Ward Beecher American clergyman and activist 1813 - 1887

The Nature, Importance and Liberties of Belief (1873)
Context: The Scriptures make the test of believing to lie in the life and in the disposition. They nowhere require men, as the condition of acceptance and salvation, to be technically and philosophically right on all points of belief; but they do require that a man, in the presence of truth, using it as he pleases, selecting it according to the analysis and attractions and repulsions of his own nature, should live right. They hold men accountable for the development of their manhood on the pattern of Christ Jesus. They say, "Here are the truths of God; sort them, use them, every man according to his own liberty, in the spirit, and not in the letter." You are called to liberty; but it is that every one of you may become men in Christ Jesus. Men are held accountable for manhood, but not for the way in which they use the instruments by which the manhood is produced.

Harry V. Jaffa photo

„For Lincoln, the principle of human equality, "that all men are created equal", did not admit exceptions.“

—  Harry V. Jaffa American historian and collegiate professor 1918 - 2015

2000s, Is Diversity Good? (2003)
Context: To allow slavery to be introduced into free territories, where it had not hitherto existed, was, Abraham Lincoln held, a very bad thing. His opponent, Stephen A. Douglas, held that it was a sacred right, belonging to the people of each territory, to decide for themselves whether or not to have slavery among their domestic institutions. According to Douglas, Lincoln wanted to destroy the diversity upon which the union had subsisted, by insisting that all the states ought to be free. But for Douglas himself, the principle of 'popular sovereignty' did not admit of exceptions. There was to be no diversity, no deviation from the right of the people to decide. For Lincoln the wrongness of slavery meant that no one, and no people, had the right to decide in its favor. For Lincoln, the principle of human equality, "that all men are created equal", did not admit exceptions.

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