„And of all the infinite universe of humanity, these people are the most guileless, the most devoid of wickedness and duplicity, the most obedient and faithful to their native masters and to the Spanish Christians whom they serve.“

History of the Indies (1561)

Last update May 22, 2020. History
Bartolomé de las Casas photo
Bartolomé de las Casas21
Spanish Dominican friar, historian, and social reformer 1474 - 1566

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„St. Francis is not only the most attractive of all the Christian saints, he is the most attractive of Christians, admired by Buddhists, atheists, completely secular, modern people, Communists, to whom the figure of Christ himself is at best unattractive.“

—  Kenneth Rexroth American poet, writer, anarchist, academic and conscientious objector 1905 - 1982

"Eckhart, Brethren of the Free Spirit" http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/communalism2.htm from Communalism: From Its Origins to the Twentieth Century (1974), ch. 4
Context: St. Francis is not only the most attractive of all the Christian saints, he is the most attractive of Christians, admired by Buddhists, atheists, completely secular, modern people, Communists, to whom the figure of Christ himself is at best unattractive. Partly this is due to the sentimentalization of the legend of his life and that of his companions in the early days of the order. Many people today who put his statue in their gardens know nothing about him except that he preached a sermon to the birds, wrote a hymn to the sun, and called the donkey his brother. These bits of information are important because they are signs of a revolution of the sensibility — which incidentally was a metaphysical revolution of which certainly St. Francis himself was quite unaware. They stand for a mystical and emotional immediate realization of the unity of being, a notion foreign, in fact antagonistic, to the main Judeo-Christian tradition.
“I am that I am” — the God of Judaism is the only self-sufficient being. All the reality that we can know is contingent, created out of nothing, and hence of an inferior order of reality. Faced with the “utterly other,” the contingent soul can finally only respond with fear and trembling.

Bartolomé de las Casas photo

„These people are the most devoid of rancors, hatreds, or desire for vengeance of any people in the world.“

—  Bartolomé de las Casas Spanish Dominican friar, historian, and social reformer 1474 - 1566

History of the Indies (1561)

John Gray photo
Sören Kierkegaard photo

„And this is one of the most crucial definitions for the whole of Christianity; that the opposite of sin is not virtue but faith.“

—  Sören Kierkegaard Danish philosopher and theologian, founder of Existentialism 1813 - 1855

Source: The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening

T. B. Joshua photo

„Of all graces, faith honours Christ the most; of all graces, Christ honours faith the most.“

—  T. B. Joshua Nigerian Christian leader 1963

On faith - "Reflections On Prophet TB Joshua At 46" http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/113095 "American Chronicle" (August 5 2009)

Moses Hess photo

„We Germans are the most universal, the most European people of Europe.“

—  Moses Hess German philosopher 1812 - 1875

Ibid
Die europäische Triarchie (The European Triarchy)

Fritz Leiber photo
Mikhail Bakunin photo

„The State, therefore, is the most flagrant, the most cynical, and the most complete negation of humanity. It shatters the universal solidarity of all men on the earth, and brings some of them into association only for the purpose of destroying, conquering, and enslaving all the rest.“

—  Mikhail Bakunin Russian revolutionary, philosopher, and theorist of collectivist anarchism 1814 - 1876

Rousseau's Theory of the State (1873)
Context: We … have humanity divided into an indefinite number of foreign states, all hostile and threatened by each other. There is no common right, no social contract of any kind between them; otherwise they would cease to be independent states and become the federated members of one great state. But unless this great state were to embrace all of humanity, it would be confronted with other great states, each federated within, each maintaining the same posture of inevitable hostility. War would still remain the supreme law, an unavoidable condition of human survival.
Every state, federated or not, would therefore seek to become the most powerful. It must devour lest it be devoured, conquer lest it be conquered, enslave lest it be enslaved, since two powers, similar and yet alien to each other, could not coexist without mutual destruction.
The State, therefore, is the most flagrant, the most cynical, and the most complete negation of humanity. It shatters the universal solidarity of all men on the earth, and brings some of them into association only for the purpose of destroying, conquering, and enslaving all the rest. It protects its own citizens only; it recognises human rights, humanity, civilisation within its own confines alone. Since it recognises no rights outside itself, it logically arrogates to itself the right to exercise the most ferocious inhumanity toward all foreign populations, which it can plunder, exterminate, or enslave at will. If it does show itself generous and humane toward them, it is never through a sense of duty, for it has no duties except to itself in the first place, and then to those of its members who have freely formed it, who freely continue to constitute it or even, as always happens in the long run, those who have become its subjects. As there is no international law in existence, and as it could never exist in a meaningful and realistic way without undermining to its foundations the very principle of the absolute sovereignty of the State, the State can have no duties toward foreign populations. Hence, if it treats a conquered people in a humane fashion, if it plunders or exterminates it halfway only, if it does not reduce it to the lowest degree of slavery, this may be a political act inspired by prudence, or even by pure magnanimity, but it is never done from a sense of duty, for the State has an absolute right to dispose of a conquered people at will.
This flagrant negation of humanity which constitutes the very essence of the State is, from the standpoint of the State, its supreme duty and its greatest virtue. It bears the name patriotism, and it constitutes the entire transcendent morality of the State. We call it transcendent morality because it usually goes beyond the level of human morality and justice, either of the community or of the private individual, and by that same token often finds itself in contradiction with these. Thus, to offend, to oppress, to despoil, to plunder, to assassinate or enslave one's fellowman is ordinarily regarded as a crime. In public life, on the other hand, from the standpoint of patriotism, when these things are done for the greater glory of the State, for the preservation or the extension of its power, it is all transformed into duty and virtue. And this virtue, this duty, are obligatory for each patriotic citizen; everyone is supposed to exercise them not against foreigners only but against one's own fellow citizens, members or subjects of the State like himself, whenever the welfare of the State demands it.
This explains why, since the birth of the State, the world of politics has always been and continues to be the stage for unlimited rascality and brigandage, brigandage and rascality which, by the way, are held in high esteem, since they are sanctified by patriotism, by the transcendent morality and the supreme interest of the State. This explains why the entire history of ancient and modern states is merely a series of revolting crimes; why kings and ministers, past and present, of all times and all countries — statesmen, diplomats, bureaucrats, and warriors — if judged from the standpoint of simple morality and human justice, have a hundred, a thousand times over earned their sentence to hard labour or to the gallows. There is no horror, no cruelty, sacrilege, or perjury, no imposture, no infamous transaction, no cynical robbery, no bold plunder or shabby betrayal that has not been or is not daily being perpetrated by the representatives of the states, under no other pretext than those elastic words, so convenient and yet so terrible: "for reasons of state."

„Faith is a universal human phenomenon. All people live by some faith.“

—  Roger Haight American theologian 1936

Source: Dynamics Of Theology, Chapter One, Faith As A Dimension of The Human, p. 15

John Hoole photo

„But such their power who rule with tyrant sway,
Whom most they loath the people most obey.“

—  John Hoole British translator 1727 - 1803

Book XXXVII, line 774
Translations, Orlando Furioso of Ludovico Ariosto (1773)

Ludovico Ariosto photo

„But such their power who rule with tyrant sway,
Whom most they loath the people most obey.“

—  Ludovico Ariosto, book Orlando Furioso

Ma 'l populo facea come i più fanno,
Ch'ubbidiscon più a quei che più in odio hanno.
Canto XXXVII, stanza 104 (tr. J. Hoole)
Orlando Furioso (1532)

Carl R. Rogers photo

„What is most personal is most universal.“

—  Carl R. Rogers American psychologist 1902 - 1987

Source: On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy

David Myatt photo
Jean Froissart photo

„Consider for a moment what it is like when the people are roused to revolt and get the upper hand of their master, and especially in England. Then there is no stopping it, for they are the most dangerous common people in the world, the most violent and presumptuous. And of all the commons in England the Londoners are the ringleaders.“

—  Jean Froissart French writer 1337 - 1405

Considerés que c'est de pueple, quant il s'esmuet et esliève et il a puissance contre son seigneur, et par especial en Angleterre. Là n'y a-il nul remède, car c'est le plus périlleus poeuple commun qui soit au monde et le plus oultrageux et orgueilleux. Et de tous ceulx d'Angleterre Londriens sont chiefs.
Book 4, pp. 454-5.
Chroniques (1369–1400)

William Wood, 1st Baron Hatherley photo
Ludwig von Mises photo
António Lobo Antunes photo

„For me the most radical demand of Christian faith lies in summoning the courage to say yes to the present risenness of Jesus Christ.“

—  Brennan Manning writer, American Roman Catholic priest and United States Marine 1934 - 2013

Source: Abba's Child: The Cry of the Heart for Intimate Belonging

Henry Adams photo
Jean Jacques Rousseau photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“