„Christ seeks souls, not property. … He who wants a large part of mankind to be such that … he may act like a ferocious executioner toward them, press them into slavery, and through them grow rich, is a despotic master, not a Christian; a son of Satan, not of God; a plunderer, not a shepherd.“

Source: In Defense of the Indians (1548), p. 40

Last update June 4, 2020. History
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Bartolomé de las Casas21
Spanish Dominican friar, historian, and social reformer 1474 - 1566

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