„The question of whether a computer is playing chess, or doing long division, or translating Chinese, is like the question of whether robots can murder or airplanes can fly -- or people; after all, the "flight" of the Olympic long jump champion is only an order of magnitude short of that of the chicken champion (so I'm told). These are questions of decision, not fact; decision as to whether to adopt a certain metaphoric extension of common usage.“

Powers and Prospects, 1996 https://chomsky.info/prospects01/.
Quotes 1990s, 1995-1999

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update June 3, 2021. History
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Noam Chomsky331
american linguist, philosopher and activist 1928

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