„The noble art of losing face
may some day save the human race
and turn into eternal merit
what weaker minds would call disgrace.“

—  Piet Hein

Losing Face
Grooks

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update Jan. 15, 2022. History
Piet Hein photo
Piet Hein37
Danish puzzle designer, mathematician, author, poet 1905 - 1996

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1951 - 1968, The Creative Act', 1957
Context: I want to clarify our understanding of the word 'art' – to be sure, without an attempt to a definition. What I have in mind is that art may be bad, good or indifferent, but, whatever adjective is used, we must call it art, and bad art is still art in the same way as a bad emotion is still an emotion.
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Thou idol of the human race,
Thou tyrant of the human heart,
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