„To learn is not to know; there are the learners and the learned. Memory makes the one, philosophy the others.“

Source: The Count of Monte Cristo

Last update May 22, 2020. History
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Alexandre Dumas121
French writer and dramatist, father of the homonym writer a… 1802 - 1870

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Alexandre Dumas photo

„Memory makes the one, philosophy the other.“

—  Alexandre Dumas, book The Count of Monte Cristo

Chapter 17 http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo/Chapter_17
The Count of Monte Cristo (1845–1846)
Context: "You must teach me a small part of what you know," said Dantes, "if only to prevent your growing weary of me. I can well believe] that so learned a person as yourself would prefer absolute [[solitude to being tormented with the company of one as ignorant and uninformed as myself. If you will only agree to my request, I promise you never to mention another word about escaping." The abbe smiled. "Alas, my boy," said he, "human knowledge is confined within very narrow limits; and when I have taught you mathematics, physics, history, and the three or four modern languages with which I am acquainted, you will know as much as I do myself. Now, it will scarcely require two years for me to communicate to you the stock of learning I possess."
"Two years!" exclaimed Dantes; "do you really believe I can acquire all these things in so short a time?"
"Not their application, certainly, but their principles you may; to learn is not to know; there are the learners and the learned. Memory makes the one, philosophy the other."

Béla H. Bánáthy photo
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„Complex human learning is a concept involving communication between the participant in the learning process, who commonly occupy the roles of learner and teacher.“

—  Gordon Pask British psychologist 1928 - 1996

Pask (1976) "Conversational techniques in the study and practice of education", In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol 46, p. 24.

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„In a world of change, the learners shall inherit the earth, while the learned shall find themselves perfectly suited for a world that no longer exists.“

—  Eric Hoffer American philosopher 1898 - 1983

Section 32 <!-- also quoted in On Becoming a Leader (1989) by Warren G. Bennis, p. 189 -->
Reflections on the Human Condition (1973)
Variant: In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists.
Context: The central task of education is to implant a will and a facility for learning; it should produce not learned but learning people. The truly human society is a learning society, where grandparents, parents, and children are students together.
In a time of drastic change it is the learners who inherit the future. The learned usually find themselves equipped to live in a world that no longer exists.

„Real learning… is a thing in which the learner is not a receiver only of words written or spoken: he must be a doer.“

—  George Long English classical scholar 1800 - 1879

An Old Man's Thoughts on Many Things, Of Education I

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„It is far easier to learn science first and philosophy later than the other way round!“

—  Harvey Brown (philosopher) Philosopher of physics 1950

Physics and Philiosophy in Oxford: a prosperous example of interdisciplinarity, in [Innovation and interdisciplinarity in the university, EDIPUCRS, 2007, 8-574-30677-0, 308 http://books.google.com/books?id=-OGr007TQ0AC&printsec=frontcover#PPA308,M1]

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„The "requirements," indeed, force the teacher — and administrator — into the role of an authoritarian functionary whose primary task becomes that of enforcing the requirements rather than helping the learner to learn.“

—  Neil Postman American writer and academic 1931 - 2003

Teaching as a Subversive Activity (1969)
Context: Conventional "requirements" …are systems of prescriptions and proscriptions intended solely to limit the physical and intellectual movements of students — to "keep them in line, in sequence, in order," etc. They shift focus of attention from the learner (check [Goodwin] Watson again) to the "course." In the process, "requirements" violate virtually everything we know about learning because they comprise the matrix of an elaborate system of punishment, that in turn, comprise a threatening atmosphere in which positive learning cannot occur. The "requirements," indeed, force the teacher — and administrator — into the role of an authoritarian functionary whose primary task becomes that of enforcing the requirements rather than helping the learner to learn. The whole authority of the system is contingent upon the "requirements."

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