„In some lost fold of the past, we wanted to be lions and we're no more than castrated cats“

Source: The Savage Detectives

Last update Dec. 8, 2021. History
Roberto Bolaño photo
Roberto Bolaño49
Chilean author 1953 - 2003

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Alfred, Lord Tennyson photo

„Charm us, orator, till the lion look no larger than the cat.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson British poet laureate 1809 - 1892

Source: Locksley Hall Sixty Years After (1886), Line 112

George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore photo

„I had rather be esteemed a Fool for some by the Hazard of one Month's journey, than to prove myself one certainly for six Years by past, if the Business be now lost for some want of a little Pains and Care.“

—  George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore English politician and coloniser 1578 - 1632

To Thomas Wentworth, cited by Luca Codignola in The Coldest Harbour of the Land (Québec, Canada: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1988), p. 43.
Context: [B]eing bound for a long Journey to a Place which I have had a long Desire to visit, and have now the Opportunity and Leave to do: It is Newfoundland I mean, which imports me more than in Curiosity only to see; for I must either go and settle it in a better Order than it is, or else give it over, and lose all the Charges I have been at hitherto for other Men to build their Fortunes upon. And I had rather be esteemed a Fool for some by the Hazard of one Month's journey, than to prove myself one certainly for six Years by past, if the Business be now lost for some want of a little Pains and Care.

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Margaret Thatcher photo

„I believe in the British lion and I believe that the British character is lion-hearted, and I believe that it has not been lion-hearted in some of the post-War period, and I want it to get back to being lion hearted.“

—  Margaret Thatcher British stateswoman and politician 1925 - 2013

Second term as Prime Minister
Source: Radio Interview for BBC Radio 3 (17 December 1985) http://www.margaretthatcher.org/document/105934

„some of us have so much defeat in our past that we feel we lost the race before we knew it started.“

—  Beth Moore American evangelist 1957

Source: Believing in God - Member Book

Robert Browning photo
Frederick Russell Burnham photo

„I am more afraid of an army of a hundred sheep led by a lion than an army of a hundred lions led by a sheep.“

—  Frederick Russell Burnham father of scouting; military scout; soldier of fortune; oil man; writer; rancher 1861 - 1947

Taking Chances (1944)

Oliver Herford photo

„Cat: A pygmy lion who loves mice, hates dogs and patronizes human beings.“

—  Oliver Herford American writer 1863 - 1935

The Reader's Digest, Volume 121 (1982), p. 118.
Attributed

Cassandra Clare photo

„"Are we long-lost friends, by chance?"
"No, we never got along all that well. Long-lost acquaintances? Compadres? My cat liked you."“

—  Cassandra Clare, The Mortal Instruments

Simon Lewis and Magnus Bane, pg. 689
The Mortal Instruments, City of Heavenly Fire (2014)

David Pearce (philosopher) photo

„It is easy to romanticise, say, tigers or lions and cats. We admire their magnificent beauty, strength and agility. But we would regard their notional human counterparts as wanton psychopaths of the worst kind.“

—  David Pearce (philosopher) British transhumanist

1.10 On the Misguided Romanticisation of Feline Psychopaths https://www.hedweb.com/hedethic/hedon1.htm#feline
The Hedonistic Imperative https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/514875 (1995)

Ernest Hemingway photo
Ze Frank photo

„[T]here's more than one way to skin a cat. But from the cat's perspective, they all suck.“

—  Ze Frank American online performance artist 1972

http://www.zefrank.com/theshow/archives/2006/05/060206.html
"The Show" (www.zefrank.com/theshow/)

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Philip Pullman photo

„Perhaps some particles move backward in time; perhaps the future affects the past in some way we don't understand; or perhaps the universe is simply more aware than we are. There are many things we haven't yet learned how to read.“

—  Philip Pullman, book Lyra's Oxford

Lyra's Oxford (2003)
Context: All these tattered old bits and pieces have a history and a meaning. A group of them together can seem like the traces left by an ionizing particle in a bubble chamber: they draw the line of a path taken by something too mysterious to see. That path is a story, of course. What scientists do when they look at the line of bubbles on the screen is work out the story of the particle that made them: what sort of particle it must have been, and what caused it to move in that way, and how long it was likely to continue.
Dr. Mary Malone would have been familiar with that sort of story in the course of her search for dark matter. But it might not have occurred to her, for example, when she sent a postcard to an old friend shortly after arriving in Oxford for the first time, that that card itself would trace part of a story that hadn't yet happened when she wrote it. Perhaps some particles move backward in time; perhaps the future affects the past in some way we don't understand; or perhaps the universe is simply more aware than we are. There are many things we haven't yet learned how to read.
The story in this book is partly about that very process.

Eric Hoffer photo

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