„No thinking man in this day can fail to recognise that one cannot properly evaluate an historical period without considering economic conditions. But much more one-sided is the view which maintains that all history is merely the result of economic conditions, under whose influence all other life phenomena have received form and imprint.
There are thousands of events in history which cannot be explained by purely economic reasons, or by them alone.“

—  Rudolf Rocker, książka Nationalism and Culture

Źródło: Nationalism and Culture (1937), Ch. 1 "The Insufficiency of Economic Materialism"
Kontekst: No thinking man in this day can fail to recognise that one cannot properly evaluate an historical period without considering economic conditions. But much more one-sided is the view which maintains that all history is merely the result of economic conditions, under whose influence all other life phenomena have received form and imprint.
There are thousands of events in history which cannot be explained by purely economic reasons, or by them alone. It is quite possible to bring everything within the terms of a definite scheme, but the result is usually not worth the effort. There is scarcely an historical event to whose shaping economic causes have not contributed, but economic forces are not the only motive powers which have set everything else in motion. All social phenomena are the result of a series of various causes, in most cases so inwardly related that it is quite impossible clearly to separate one from the other. We are always dealing with the interplay of various causes which, as a rule, can be clearly recognised but cannot be calculated according to scientific methods.

Pochodzi z Wikiquote. Ostatnia aktualizacja 3 czerwca 2021. Historia
Rudolf Rocker Fotografia
Rudolf Rocker2
1873 - 1958

Podobne cytaty

Rudolf Rocker Fotografia

„The deeper we trace the political influences in history, the more are we convinced that the "will to power" has up to now been one of the strongest motives in the development of human social forms. The idea that all political and social events are but the result of given economic conditions and can be explained by them cannot endure careful consideration.“

—  Rudolf Rocker, książka Nationalism and Culture

Źródło: Nationalism and Culture (1937), Ch. 1 "The Insufficiency of Economic Materialism"
Kontekst: The deeper we trace the political influences in history, the more are we convinced that the "will to power" has up to now been one of the strongest motives in the development of human social forms. The idea that all political and social events are but the result of given economic conditions and can be explained by them cannot endure careful consideration. That economic conditions and the special forms of social production have played a part in the evolution of humanity everyone knows who has been seriously trying to reach the foundations of social phenomena. This fact was well known before Marx set out to explain it in his manner. A whole line of eminent French socialists like Saint–Simon, Considerant, Louis Blanc, Proudhon and many others had pointed to it in their writings, and it is known that Marx reached socialism by the study of these very writings.

Paul A. Samuelson Fotografia
Theodore Roosevelt Fotografia
Otto Pfleiderer Fotografia
Jeffrey D. Sachs Fotografia

„We need… a much more competent and honest government. Economic reform and political reform must go hand in hand. Without the one there cannot be the other.“

—  Jeffrey D. Sachs American economist 1954

"The Price Of Civilization: Reawakening American Virtue And Prosperity," w:Good Reads, https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/17083930-the-price-of-civilization-reawakening-american-virtue-and-prosperity

Ernest Mandel Fotografia
Carl Friedrich Gauss Fotografia
Simone Weil Fotografia
John Calvin Fotografia
Samuel Bowles Fotografia
Robert Hunter (author) Fotografia

„If one's point of view is based on what is now called the economic interpretation of history, one is emancipated“

—  Robert Hunter (author) American sociologist, author, golf course architect 1874 - 1942

Źródło: Violence and the Labor Movement (1914), p.xii
Kontekst: If one's point of view is that of the anarchist, he is led inevitably to make his war upon individuals. The more sensitive and sincere he is, the more bitter and implacable becomes that war. If one's point of view is based on what is now called the economic interpretation of history, one is emancipated, in so far as that is possible for emotional beings, from all hatred of individuals, and one sees before him only the necessity of readjusting the economic basis of our common life in order to achieve a more nearly perfect social order.

Adolf Hitler Fotografia

„We are socialists, we are enemies of today's capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are all determined to destroy this system under all conditions.“

—  Adolf Hitler Führer and Reich Chancellor of Germany, Leader of the Nazi Party 1889 - 1945

This misattribution is sourced from John Toland. In Adolf Hitler: The Definitive Biography (1976), it is attributed to Hitler in a speech of May 1, 1927. It is recorded in Thoughts about the Tasks of the Future by Gregor Strasser on June 15, 1926.
Misattributed

Neil Kinnock Fotografia
Chester W. Wright Fotografia
Leon C. Marshall Fotografia
Joan Robinson Fotografia

„There is no such thing as a normal period of history. Normality is a fiction of economic textbooks.“

—  Joan Robinson English economist 1903 - 1983

Źródło: Contributions to Modern Economics (1978), Chapter 1, The Second Crisis of Economic Theory, p. 3

Murray N. Rothbard Fotografia
Robert Hunter (author) Fotografia

„Such economic conditions are ideal“

—  Robert Hunter (author) American sociologist, author, golf course architect 1874 - 1942

Źródło: Why We Fail as Christians (1919), p. 68
Kontekst: In the time of Jesus almost everybody worked in small shops or on the land and then sold or bartered their own products in the towns. There were no vast industrial centers, no great factories, no steam power or electricity. Everyone knew his neighbor by name. There was no highly developed division of labor, nor were there great extremes of wealth and poverty. Such economic conditions are ideal—or at least as nearly ideal as they can ever be—for the spread of Christian communism. And so they are still in many parts of Russia.

Pokrewne tematy