„The day becomes more solemn and serene
When noon is past; there is a harmony
In autumn, and a lustre in its sky,
Which through the summer is not heard or seen“

St. 7
Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (1816)
Kontextus: The day becomes more solemn and serene
When noon is past; there is a harmony
In autumn, and a lustre in its sky,
Which through the summer is not heard or seen,
As if it could not be, as if it had not been!
Thus let thy power, which like the truth
Of nature on my passive youth
Descended, to my onward life supply
Its calm, to one who worships thee,
And every form containing thee,
Whom, SPIRIT fair, thy spells did bind
To fear himself, and love all human kind.

Forrás Wikiquote. Utolsó frissítés 2021. június 3.. Történelem

Hasonló idézetek

Frederick Douglass fénykép

„He was never loud and noisy, but calm and serene as a summer sky, and as pure.“

—  Frederick Douglass American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman 1818 - 1895

Forrás: 1880s, Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881), pp. 263–264.
Kontextus: I had been living four or five months in New Bedford when there came a young man to me with a copy of the Liberator, the paper edited by William Lloyd Garrison and published by Isaac Knapp, and asked me to subscribe for it. I told him I had but just escaped from slavery, and was of course very poor, and had no money then to pay for it. He was very willing to take me as a subscriber, notwithstanding, and from this time I was brought into contact with the mind of Mr. Garrison, and his paper took a place in my heart second only to the Bible. It detested slavery, and made no truce with the traffickers in the bodies and souls of men. It preached human brotherhood; it exposed hypocrisy and wickedness in high places; it denounced oppression; and with all the solemnity of "Thus saith the Lord," demanded the complete emancipation of my race. I loved this paper and its editor. He seemed to me an all-sufficient match to every opponent, whether they spoke in the name of the law or the gospel. His words were full of holy fire, and straight to the point. Something of a hero-worshiper by nature, here was one to excite my admiration and reverence. It was my privilege to listen to a lecture in Liberty Hall by Mr. Garrison, its editor. He was then a young man, of a singularly pleasing countenance, and earnest and impressive manner. On this occasion he announced nearly all his heresies. His Bible was his textbook — held sacred as the very word of the Eternal Father. He believed in sinless perfection, complete submission to insults and injuries, and literal obedience to the injunction if smitten "on one cheek to turn the other also." Not only was Sunday a Sabbath, but all days were Sabbaths, and to be kept holy. All sectarianism was false and mischievous — the regenerated throughout the world being members of one body, and the head Christ Jesus. Prejudice against color was rebellion against God. Of all men beneath the sky, the slaves, because most neglected and despised, were nearest and dearest to his great heart. Those ministers who defended slavery from the Bible were of their "father the devil"; and those churches which fellowshiped slaveholders as Christians, were synagogues of Satan, and our nation was a nation of liars. He was never loud and noisy, but calm and serene as a summer sky, and as pure. "You are the man — the Moses, raised up by God, to deliver his modern Israel from bondage," was the spontaneous feeling of my heart, as I sat away back in the hall and listened to his mighty words, — mighty in truth, — mighty in their simple earnestness.

Thomas Hardy fénykép
Letitia Elizabeth Landon fénykép
Ray Bradbury fénykép
John Donne fénykép

„No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace,
As I have seen in one autumnal face.“

—  John Donne English poet 1572 - 1631

No. 9, The Autumnal, line 1
Elegies
Forrás: The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose

Stéphane Mallarmé fénykép

„The visible serene artificial breath
Of inspiration, which regains the sky.“

—  Stéphane Mallarmé French Symbolist poet 1842 - 1898

The Afternoon of a Faun (1876)
Kontextus: No water murmurs but what my flute pours
On the chord sprinkled thicket; and the sole wind
Prompt to exhale from my two pipes, before
It scatters the sound in a waterless shower,
Is, on the horizon's unwrinkled space,
The visible serene artificial breath
Of inspiration, which regains the sky.

George Gissing fénykép
Diana Gabaldon fénykép
Ray Bradbury fénykép
P. D. James fénykép
Wallace Stevens fénykép

„One of the limits of reality
Presents itself in Oley when the hay,
Baked through long days, is piled in mows. It is
A land too ripe for enigmas, too serene.…“

—  Wallace Stevens American poet 1879 - 1955

"Credences of Summer"
Collected Poems (1954)
Kontextus: One of the limits of reality
Presents itself in Oley when the hay,
Baked through long days, is piled in mows. It is
A land too ripe for enigmas, too serene.…
Things stop in that direction and since they stop
The direction stops and we accept what is
As good. The utmost must be good and is…

Bashō Matsuo fénykép
Van Morrison fénykép
Percy Bysshe Shelley fénykép
Robert Browning fénykép
Letitia Elizabeth Landon fénykép

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